Digital Darkroom

Sort By: Post DateTitle Publish Date
Howard Millard  |  Jan 01, 2008  |  0 comments

Have you ever wanted to draw and paint but didn't feel that you had the technical skill? Well, Photoshop can help you awaken the artist within to transform one of your own photos into a pencil sketch or line drawing. A fine black and white rendering may be exactly the effect you're seeking to create a unique, elegant look for your subject, or a new service to offer to...

Jon Canfield  |  Jan 01, 2008  |  0 comments

OK, you've done all the right things--you've calibrated your display using one of the hardware devices such as the X-Rite i1Display 2, Pantone huey, or ColorVision Spyder2. You've set your Photoshop work space up correctly, using Adobe RGB or ProPhoto RGB as the color space for your documents, and you've made all the right selections in the printer...

Rod Lawton  |  Oct 01, 2007  |  0 comments

The old-style picture stories once popular in newspapers and magazines seem to have fallen out of favor. That's a shame, because picture stories remain a very effective and powerful means of expression. When you are preparing pictures for publication, exhibition, or even a personal portfolio, you will need to spend some time comparing, selecting, and juxtaposing photographs...

Steve Bedell  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  0 comments

I had a thought (it happens!) back in the `80s. I was thinking how great it would be to create a portrait piece of someone that combined several images together to show the many facets of that individual. Let's take an example. Suppose you were commissioned to do a portrait of a young man. His interests may include playing football, swimming, sailing, playing guitar...

Howard Millard  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  0 comments

No matter how careful you are, soft happens. Your subject, whether a femme fatale or a flower, may move. The light level may be low so you have to shoot at a slow shutter speed, and camera movement blurs the photo slightly. Or you may be photographing under bright overcast conditions outdoors--plenty of light for most situations--but you're shooting soccer...

Joseph A. Dickerson  |  May 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Have you always been intrigued by panoramic photography but couldn’t bring yourself to pony up for a dedicated panorama camera? Well, today you don’t have to.

Joe Farace  |  May 01, 2007  |  0 comments

A vailable light, unavailable light, available darkness, or low light. It doesn’t matter what you call it.

Joe Farace  |  May 01, 2007  |  0 comments

One of the easiest ways to improve your images is to use lens filters, but like so much in the photo world, life is rarely that simple.

Steve Bedell  |  May 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Retouching a portrait using film used to be a pretty simple task. Send the negative to your lab, check the “retouch” box, pay $5 or so, and the job was done.

Darryl C. Nicholas  |  May 01, 2007  |  0 comments

If you have ever had the experience of trying to convert your favorite slide or color negative to an electronic file you have probably run into the problem called “noise.”...

Chris Maher and Larry Berman  |  May 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Both fiber-based and RC photographic prints have been around for many years, and the materials and processes to mount and frame them are well understood.

Peter K. Burian  |  May 01, 2007  |  0 comments

In digital photography, exposure control is sometimes considered irrelevant. “You can easily fix any problems in your computer,” some friends will suggest.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Stop shooting! That’s the first thing to do when you accidentally delete an image file or inadvertently format a memory card full of images.

Howard Millard  |  May 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Whether you shoot portraits, landscapes, still life, or nature, soft focus effects can add an evocative, mysterious tone to your photographs.

Anthony L. Celeste  |  Apr 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Many people tend to associate JPEGs with poor quality. However, when a JPEG has poor quality, it's the result of the format being used incorrectly, not a flaw in the format itself. Used properly, JPEG can and will produce a file that cannot be distinguished from any other format.

The main advantage of JPEG is clearly its superior compression. An RGB image...

Pages

X