Photo Gallery Show Reviews

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Suzanne Driscoll  |  Oct 14, 2016  |  0 comments

There is no better time to look back at the work of Ansel Adams than this year’s 100th anniversary of the U.S. National Park Service. Adams was deeply committed to preserving the wilderness, and his black-and-white photographs of the West became one of the most important records of what many of the national parks were like before tourism greatly expanded.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 20, 2016  |  0 comments

Documentary photographer Walker Evans (1903-1975) was not only one of America’s most influential artists of the 20th century; he was a superb visual storyteller. His approach to photography was simple: “Stare. It is a way to educate your eye, and more. Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You are not here long.”

Cynthia Boylan  |  Oct 12, 2015  |  0 comments

The powerful work of Norwegian photographer and artist S. Manneraak will be on display this month in a unique exhibition titled "Norwegian Hallucinations. Canoe Studios, which is hosting the show, partnered with Legion Paper to put on the exhibition.

Chuck DeLaney  |  Aug 04, 2015  |  0 comments

Herb Ritts (1952-2002) began his career in the late 1970s, when photographers helped ignite the modern celebrity cult. The stars shone so brightly, the media coverage was widespread, and the public’s appetite was so great that the photographers were themselves illuminated by the glow from their subjects.

Jim Graham  |  Apr 21, 2015  |  0 comments

Much like the swallows return to Capistrano each year so do the throngs of those that love fine photography. Like salmon swimming up Park Avenue to the Armory in New York City, they head to the yearly AIPAD (Association of International Photography as Art Dealers) show. This show gathers together more than 80 galleries from throughout the world.

Steve Meltzer  |  Mar 04, 2015  |  0 comments

My dog-eared copy of Josef Koudelka’s Gypsies sits in the bookcase next to Cartier-Bresson’s Decisive Moments and Robert Frank’s The Americans. Like those books, it was fundamental to my development as a photographer. From the moment I saw it I was mesmerized by its stunning black-and-white images. Published by Aperture Books in 1975, it contained page after page of Koudelka’s dark and brooding photographs of European gypsies; the Romani or Roma people.

Chuck DeLaney  |  Jan 06, 2015  |  0 comments

American photographer Minor White (1908 – 1976) played several significant roles during the decades in the last century when photography established itself as a museum-worthy art form. In the history of photography he is, without question, an important figure, although there remains great debate as to the true measure of his stature and influence as a photographer.

Steve Meltzer  |  Dec 26, 2014  |  0 comments

Carleton Watkins was perhaps America’s greatest 19th century landscape photographer yet today he’s largely unknown. His breathtaking landscapes of the Yosemite Valley were instrumental in preserving the valley for future generations and paving the way for both the National Parks system and the environmental movement.

Steve Meltzer  |  Dec 10, 2014  |  0 comments

Good photographers are said to have a good “eye” that distinguishes them from other photographers. There’s no better way to understand this than to see how several very good photographers photograph the same subject. A case in point is a new exhibition of photographs of Marilyn Monroe titled “Inoubliable Marilyn” (“Unforgettable Marilyn”) at Paris’s La Galerie de l’Instant (December 12, 2014-February 25, 2015).

Steve Meltzer  |  Nov 14, 2014  |  0 comments

By any definition, Sebastião Salgado is one the most important photographers working today. Currently he has a large exhibition of his work on display at the International Center for Photography (ICP) in New York City through the very beginning of January 2015. It is will be the last photo show at this location, before ICP’s move next year to a new exhibition space in New York’s Bowery neighborhood.

Steve Meltzer  |  Nov 04, 2014  |  0 comments

Through his camera viewfinder Marc Riboud sees a world of gestures and graceful movements framed by elegant geometrical spaces. For over sixty years, he has photographed people and places with eyes full of wonder. Now in both New York City and his hometown of Lyon, France his delightful images from nearly sixty years of photography are on exhibit.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Oct 10, 2014  |  0 comments

Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals is a retrospective opening on November 1, 2014 at the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA). The show will be the largest presentation of this pioneering photographer’s work, and is organized by Linda Benedict-Jones, curator of photography at CMOA.

Steve Meltzer  |  Oct 01, 2014  |  0 comments

If, like most of us, you think that you know all about the Dust Bowl/Depression Era photography of the Farm Security Administration, think again. While you may have seen some of the FSA’s greatest hits, like Dorothea Lange’s “Migrant Mother,” there is a rich vein of images still to be discovered.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Sep 30, 2014  |  0 comments

The George Eastman House is currently hosting the Innovation in the Imaging Capital exhibit from September 20, 2014 to January 4, 2015. The main focus of the show is the major contributions to the development of imaging technology made possible by the various inventions that were created—or developed—in the town of Rochester, New York. Since 1888 Rochester has been widely known as America's center for imaging innovation. 

Cynthia Boylan  |  Sep 09, 2014  |  0 comments

SlowExposures 2014 (an annual event created to celebrate photography of the rural South) will be host to the Confessions for a Son exhibit. Featuring a selection of images from photographer Millford Evans’ book of the same name, the show will be on view from September 19 to 28 at the R.F. Strickland Building, 144 Main Street, Concord, GA 30206. The accompanying pre-publication book signing will be held on September 21 from 12:30 to 1:30pm. 

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