DSLR Reviews

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Dan Havlik  |  May 21, 2018  |  0 comments

The Nikon D850 has certainly earned its fair share of accolades since it was launched in August 2017. We named it our favorite camera of 2017, and it also made the Technical Press Association International’s (TIPA) list as the Best Pro DSLR of 2018. Now two photographers and prominent YouTube personalities say the Nikon D850 could be the best camera of all time.

Dan Havlik  |  Nov 06, 2014  |  0 comments

Remember the Canon 7D Mark II? Well, we’re still waiting for a final production sample of that APS-C sensor-based DSLR to review but, in the mean time, you can enjoy this cool video clip (below) showing a photographer jumping out of a plane with a pre-production version of the 7D II.

Joe Farace  |  Apr 01, 2011  |  2 comments

The Nikon D3100 ups the D3000’s megapixel ante from 10.2 megapixels to 14.2, adds Live View, video capture, and support for all functions of AI-P Nikkor lenses except autofocus and 3D Color Matrix Metering II.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jul 11, 2012  |  0 comments

The D3200 is Nikon’s new entry level SLR with an outstanding nominal resolution of 24MP. The camera uses an APS-C sized CMOS sensor 23.2 x 15.4mm in size, Nikon’s DX format.

The camera offers a lot of help to beginners; just like the forerunner D3100, the D3200 offers a special “Guide” mode. When using this mode and starting the D3200, it will ask the user whether he or she wants to shoot, to review or to setup the camera menu. If the choice is to shoot the camera“asks” whether the user is an absolute beginner and needs “easy operation” or an advanced user who wants “advanced operation.” If an absolute beginner, the D3200 presents short descriptions of some typical photographic situations and sets up all parameters accroding to how the photographer responds.

George Schaub  |  Feb 14, 2017  |  0 comments

My contention has always been that a real live camera affords superior image quality over any smartphone. But you know that already, especially when it comes to optical options, low-light capability, high ISO, video capability, and, perhaps most importantly, the experience of being able to see what you are shooting (through the optical finder of a DSLR) in bright light.

Joe Farace  |  May 01, 2019  |  0 comments

The Nikon D3500 is an ideal first DSLR for photographers wanting more than their smartphone can deliver. 

Edited by George Schaub  |  Feb 07, 2013  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2013  |  0 comments

The new D4 is a typical Nikon professional system: it’s extremely massive, very heavy, and all function buttons, card slots, and any other notches are sealed to prevent the intrusion of dust or rain. The camera offers two high-speed modes and is able to record 10 or 11 images per second in full 16MP resolution. In our tests the camera was able to consistently achieve this high speed. The camera uses a new shutter system based on Kevlar fibers that allow up to 400,000 exposures. With its high speed, robust shutter system, and robust body, the Nikon D4 is a clearly aimed at photojournalists and sports photographers.

George Schaub  |  Apr 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Aimed squarely at the first-time D-SLR user, and especially at those family and social photographers who have been frustrated by their digicam's bothersome shutter lag, the Nikon D40 is a compact camera that still holds enough features to satisfy budding photographers. At a mere 1 lb, 1 oz and 5x2.5x3.7" in size, the camera will feel small to those who have worked with...

Edited by George Schaub  |  Aug 12, 2014  |  0 comments

The Nikon D4S is a professional SLR system for sports and action photography. It has a full-frame sensor (36x23.9mm) that Nikon calls the “FX” format. In combination with the new EXPEED 4 image processing system, the new sensor offers an extended ISO speed range: the “native” range is between ISO 100 and 25,600, with an additional high mode equivalent of ISO 409,600 (!). The noise results are impressive in the native ISO range, while images with ISO 102,400 and ISO 204,800 show nearly the same noise artifacts as APS-C cameras in the ISO 12,800 to ISO 25,600 range.

Dan Havlik  |  May 06, 2016  |  0 comments

The 20.8-megapixel D5 is Nikon’s latest flagship full-frame DSLR and with its robust, almost muscular build and speedy overall performance, this professional camera is designed for action and sports photographers and photojournalists. One of the Nikon D5’s most eye-popping features though is that it can shoot at up to ISO 3,280,000 (no, not a typo!) to capture images in extreme low-light conditions, which could open this camera up to a whole new group of photographers. (Surveillance imaging, anyone?)

Edited by George Schaub  |  Aug 19, 2016  |  0 comments

The Nikon D500 is the “little sister” of the company’s flagship D5 professional DSLR system. The prosumer/enthusiast-focused Nikon D500 is the long-awaited successor to both the D300, which was shipped in 2007, and the upgraded D300S from 2009. The new camera offers an APS-C-sized sensor with a little more than 20MP in resolution. (The D300/D300S had a 12.3MP chip.)

Jack Neubart  |  Feb 13, 2012  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2012  |  0 comments

The new Nikon D5100 D-SLR is a compact and lightweight DX-format camera. The body is about two-thirds the size of a D300, recording on SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards. The similarly compact kit lens, an 18-55mm VR, provides good balance, and, along with my Nikon SB-900 Speedlight, all fits neatly into a compact camera bag. The grip on the D5100 was a little smaller than what I was used to, but I soon grew accustomed to it.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Aug 23, 2013  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2013  |  1 comments

The D5200 follows Nikon’s D5100 and offers a new sensor with higher resolution (24MP instead of 16MP in the D5100). The new camera has an APS-C-sized CMOS sensor and uses a fast and reliable AF system with 39 focus sensors, including nine cross-type sensors. The photographer can toggle between different AF modes with nine, 21, or 39 points with dynamic-area mode and use predictive focus tracking for moving subjects.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jun 10, 2014  |  First Published: May 01, 2014  |  0 comments

The Nikon D5300 follows the Nikon D5200 and there is an important difference between the two. The D5300 has a new image sensor without a low-pass filter, which contributed to an excellent performance in our resolution tests.
The D5300 uses a display with a 3:2 aspect ratio, which shows the whole sensor image without black borders or frames. Compared to the Nikon D5200, the LCD screen is also larger, at 3.2”, and has a very high resolution of 1.04 million RGB dots. The monitor is fully articulated and makes for very comfortable shooting.

Jack Neubart  |  Apr 15, 2015  |  0 comments

The first question I’d ask of any camera is this: Is this camera a good fit for me—for my hand, for my style of shooting, for what I want to shoot?

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