DSLR Reviews

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Joe Farace  |  Nov 08, 2011  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2011  |  3 comments

The generation of Canon EOS digital SLRs beginning with the 10D have been evolutionary, with each camera adding resolution and new features. The 60D continues in that vein but also takes a slightly different tack, adding some features from Canon’s own PowerShot series, bringing in functionality like a 3” flip-out LCD screen, and adding some creative effects that show how software is becoming an increasingly important part of any hardware offering. Each of these creative filters, including Soft Focus, Grainy Black and White, Toy Camera, and Miniature Effect, can be applied to a captured image creating a second “filtered” version, leaving the original file unaffected.

George Schaub  |  Jan 17, 2018  |  0 comments

When I checked Canon’s website to verify the specs on the EOS 6D Mark II ($1,999, body only; $3,099, for the test camera supplied with the EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM “kit” lens) I was a bit surprised to see it termed a “gateway” for enthusiasts to step up to a full-frame DSLR. That’s a new one to me, but that indeed is what this camera is. 

George Schaub  |  Jul 05, 2013  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2013  |  0 comments

I don’t think there’s much doubt that, all things being equal, larger sensors are capable of delivering superior image quality. The very fact that more sensor sites are available means that there’s better performance in low light, less noise in shadow areas, and that cropping does not mean making compromises in the image’s integrity. Now that the megapixel race has settled down, somewhat, and compact system cameras allow for lens interchangeability without requiring large packs to accommodate gear, a new trend is emerging where the classic D-SLR form is seeing more and more full-frame models aimed at attracting the enthusiast photographer.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Mar 25, 2014  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2014  |  0 comments

The Canon EOS 70D is a 20MP APS-C-sized sensor camera that has a massive body with a large grip on its right-hand side that makes for very comfortable handling. It has a classic SLR design with an optical viewfinder with numerous function buttons, and a fully articulated large, touch-sensitive LCD screen on its back (it can be flipped up- and downward and turned to the side) that is very handy, especially in video recording mode.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Aug 15, 2017  |  0 comments

In February 2017, Canon announced three new cameras that use basically the same image sensor and image processor system: the EOS M6 mirrorless and two DSLR systems, the EOS Rebel T7i and the EOS 77D. Located right beneath the EOS 80D, which is the mid-range DSLR of Canon’s APS-C systems, is the EOS 77D.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Nov 26, 2014  |  0 comments

The Canon EOS 7D Mark II follows the legacy 7D, which was debuted way back in 2009. Rather than being a simple update of the 7D, the 7D Mark II is a newly designed system based on an APS-C sized sensor. It offers a slightly higher sensor resolution of 20MP (7D: 18MP), but uses a completely new sensor design.

Joe Farace  |  May 26, 2016  |  0 comments

The EOS 80D is the latest iteration of Canon’s APS-C-chipped DSLRs that began with the introduction of the (no kidding) three-megapixel EOS D30 in 2000. I’ve owned and shot with every camera in this series through the 60D. I so dearly loved my Canon 50D, now converted to infrared-only operation, that I couldn’t imagine anything better, at least until I got the 60D. What happened to the 70D? I guess I must have missed that one. No matter, I was eager to put the new EOS 80D to work because of the specs and features it offered.

Ron Leach  |  Nov 05, 2019  |  0 comments

Like many photographers these days, I often carry a compact mirrorless camera while traveling, intent on lightening my load. But I recently had an opportunity to hit the road with Canon’s new mid-sized EOS 90D DSLR, which boasts a 32.5MP APS-C image sensor and a host of advanced features. And, frankly, the Canon 90D performed so well that I didn’t begrudge the added weight of carrying a DSLR.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Apr 30, 2013  |  0 comments

The EOS Rebel SL1 is an ultra-small SLR system; in fact it is smaller than many bridge cameras and even lighter than many other digital cameras.
Nevertheless it’s a real SLR system with Canon’s APS-C-sized image sensor, which is a little smaller than other APS-C-sized sensors made by Nikon, Sony and other manufacturers. Due to itsvery small body the grip on the right hand side is also is a bit smaller than usual and the handling of the camera is a bit tricky for photographers withlarge hands. The small body doesn’t allow for a status LCD on the top, so all information on image parameters and menu settings are shown on the LCD screen on the back.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Feb 07, 2018  |  0 comments

The Canon EOS Rebel SL2 is a small and lightweight entry-level DSLR: 4.82x3.65x2.75 inches in size and weighing in at 16 ounces without the lens (including the battery and memory card). The SL2 features a 24.2MP APS-C CMOS sensor and a vari-angle touchscreen three-inch LCD. It also sports Dual Pixel CMOS AF with phase detection and has a low-pass filter.

Joe Farace  |  May 31, 2019  |  First Published: May 30, 2019  |  0 comments

The Canon EOS Rebel SL3 ($649 with the 18-55mm kit lens) is the latest in a series of compact Canon DSLRs that seem designed to compete with the size of mirrorless cameras. And while the Canon Rebel SL series has grown slightly since being introduced in 2013, these changes were part of a strategy of adding capabilities that were missing in entry-level competitors from other manufacturers.

Joe Farace  |  Feb 09, 2012  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2012  |  4 comments

“We’ve got to consider the pros and cons, make a list, get advice…” —Jim Backus in Rebel Without a Cause

 

I don’t blame you for being confused. I just tested the EOS Rebel T3i, which I really, really liked, and along comes this review of the EOS Rebel T3. What’s the difference? In practical terms the Rebel T3 is somewhat smaller in size, lower in resolution (12.2 vs. 18 megapixel), and lacks the T3i’s swiveling LCD screen. Oh yeah, and it’s cheaper, too. But is it any good?

Joe Farace  |  Jan 11, 2012  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2011  |  18 comments

Rebels have always delivered good value wrapped up in a compact package and it’s why I personally own two—a Rebel XT and a Rebel XTi—both of them converted to infrared-only capture. The 18-megapixel EOS Rebel T3i is clearly an evolutionary model in the line, but owners of older Rebels should take a hard look at this new model because it clearly represents Canon’s new face as reflected in the previously released EOS 60D—the flip-out screen, in-camera filters, and all that jazz.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jan 09, 2013  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2012  |  0 comments

The Canon EOS Rebel T4i offers the same sensor resolution of 18MP as its forerunner EOS T3i, but shows a lot of improvements in handling and functionality due to a new image sensor and a new image processor. The camera is Canon’s first D-SLR with a touchscreen. This screen is very large (3”) and has a very high resolution of 1,040,000 RGB dots. It is a swivel monitor that can be flipped up- and downward and tilted to the front (for self-portraits). Even though it is a touchscreen, the whole handling of the camera (menu structure, parameter setup) is still oriented on Canon’s SLR handling scenario. In contrast to many compact cameras with touchscreen-oriented operation, the touchscreen isn’t mandatory, but it’s still helpful.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Dec 16, 2014  |  0 comments

The Canon EOS Rebel T5 (a.k.a. the Canon EOS 1200D) is the newest model of Canon’s entry-level digital SLRs. The T5 features a new sensor with significantly higher resolution than the previous model (18 instead of 12MP) and minimal differences in the sensor dimensions. It also has a large LCD screen with higher resolution: it’s a 3-inch, rear display with 460,000 RGB dots. Compared to the higher resolution LCD screens on some rival DSLRs, the Canon Rebel T5’s new screen is only average. It’s also a fixed, mounted monitor instead of a swiveling/tilting display. The T5’s optical SLR viewfinder has a magnification of 0.8x and a field of view of 95 percent.

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