Pro Techniques

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 24, 2014 0 comments
Tonality does not exist in a vacuum; the tones form a visual impression in terms of both their intrinsic value and their relationship to one another. The context in which they relate is called contrast, simply the difference and relationship between the light and dark values in the scene. Contrast determines the “look” of the image, and has a profound effect upon visual effects.
Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 07, 2014 Published: Jan 01, 2014 0 comments
It all began back in 1990 with a shareware program called Paint Shop. Debuting the same year as Adobe PhotoShop 1.0, comparison to that legendary product has been inescapable. Paint Shop, known as PaintShop Pro X6 Ultimate in its current incarnation, has always been associated with three characteristics: extreme affordability, sufficient power for most photo enthusiasts, and Windows-only compatibility. PaintShop Pro has continued to evolve and improve, and today offers many significant enhancements, including the ability to run smoothly on Macs using a Windows emulation program.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

Last fall I got an e-mail and a few JPEG attachments from Jody Dole, a commercial and advertising photographer whose career adventures I’ve chronicled over the years in these and other pages. “I’ve been having a good time making 19th-century cyanotype look-alike images,” Jody wrote.

Turns out, Jody had been up to more than cyanotypes. He also had a...

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Jay Abend Posted: May 01, 1999 0 comments

One of the things that many good photographers struggle with is sharpness. I have spent years of my life working on getting the most tack-sharp images, and have even written a few stories for your favorite magazine explaining some of the things that I do...

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Joe Farace Posted: Apr 01, 2001 0 comments

Making photographs for a model's portfolio involves much more than just using the proper posing and lighting techniques and includes all of the less glamorous and business-oriented aspects of creating these kinds of images. The...

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Howard Millard Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Putting two or more captures on top of each other in a single image multiplies the potential for impact and opens up new avenues to creative expression. Whether you want to inject motion into a static shot, add moody atmosphere or dreamy nostalgia, or enhance one subject with the texture of another, multiple exposure offers a myriad of possibilities. The techniques complement...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Sep 01, 2000 0 comments

A large percentage of the population has always had a love affair with the automobile. We own more cars per capita than any other culture and we have a genuine fascination with older models. When "classic" vehicles reach a certain age, some will spend small...

David FitzSimmons Posted: May 22, 2012 Published: Apr 01, 2012 1 comments
In June 2009, Sigma Pro director Dave Metz contacted me, requesting some wildlife images for full-page Sigma advertisements. He knew that I had been working on my first book, Animals of Ohio’s Ponds and Vernal Pools (Kent State University Press, July 2011), so he figured I could send him images fairly easily. He then made an interesting—and at the time slightly disconcerting—request: would I please photograph the animals not within their natural settings but against white backgrounds?
Russell R. Caron Posted: Sep 06, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 1 comments
One of the challenges to home or professional photographersthese days is trying to keep every portrait set from looking the same. In a world where “freshness” counts a lot, being able to mix things up from one session to another, from season to season, all without jumping through too many hoops to change the set, is an advantage for many. A current trend is the ability to not only change backdrops but flooring as well, and with that in mind we recently had the opportunity to work with products from a division of the pro lab White House Custom Colour called “Backdrops by WHCC.” They have a wide range of interesting offerings in both fabric backdrops and rugged “rubberized” studio flooring.
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Joe Farace Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

If your camera doesn’t offer Live View you can add it as an accessory.

Andrea Keister Posted: Mar 01, 2008 2 comments

When our resident digital guru's Digital Darkroom Resource CD appeared in 2003 it debuted to much fanfare. The first volume included 11 chapters; shortly thereafter, Brooks released a second volume containing 16 chapters. He's now outdone himself with a new, third volume that contains 26 chapters, totaling 318 pages in PDF format plus a folder of images for print test...

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Jay McCabe Posted: Nov 01, 2006 0 comments

"Photographers may believe in certain pictures, but they have to have the educated eye of the picture editor."

"We're actually looking at film," David Doubilet says. He's at the offices of National Geographic magazine, going over the take from a recent two-month assignment in the South Pacific. The job was shot with both film and...

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Jeff Wignall Posted: Jan 24, 2014 Published: Dec 01, 2013 0 comments
One of the primary differences between a photograph and the real world is that reality has three dimensions: height, width, and depth. Your photos, of course, only have two—height and width. Any depth that exists in a photograph is purely an optical illusion. Even if you were able to create a print that was the exact same size as the scene (and wouldn’t that be fun) it would still pale beside the real thing because of the lack of that third dimension.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 24, 2014 0 comments
Photography has taught me to be aware of color, design and patterns, and I am always looking for something interesting to photograph. A few years ago when my wife was making a marble cake, I was drawn to the design in the swirling chocolate and thought it would make a successful abstract shot. I liked the images I took, but I felt more color would make the pictures a lot more interesting.
Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 01, 2000 0 comments

I have to admit something to you. About five years ago, when it was becoming very evident that digital technology would become increasingly important for the imaging professional, I tried to look the other way. I figured it would be a niche market. If they...

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