Jim Zuckerman

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Nov 24, 2014 0 comments
There are many kinds of white light. At first this statement seems like it doesn’t make sense, but if you look closely at a typical light bulb in your living room (the old kind, not the new florescent type of bulbs) and compare it with, say, a daylight florescent fixture, the light bulb is much more yellow than the florescent light. Similarly, if you compare sunrise and sunset lighting to the light from an overcast sky at noon, the lighting from low angled sunlight is very yellow—it looks golden, in fact—and the cloudy sky produces a white light that is more bluish.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Nov 24, 2014 0 comments
Capturing the details in nature requires getting close to small subjects and sometimes you will want to use flash. Shooting close-ups with flash is very different than using flash as you normally do.

The biggest problem we face when using the built-in flash or even a small hotshoe mounted accessory flash for macro work is that a flash sits no more than 6 or 7” above the lens. This means it will illuminate the top of a subject, leaving the middle and bottom portions in shadow. There’s no way the light can be dispersed over the insect, small flower, feather or whatever you might be shooting because it doesn’t have enough distance to do that.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 27, 2014 0 comments

The problem with making the right exposures in low light environments is that exposure meters, in-camera and hand held, are not particularly suited for the task. Light meters were designed to read subjects in normal daylight situations or in bright interiors. The meter will deliver a good exposure under these “normal” conditions, but low light photography is anything but normal. There is either a lack of light, many dark areas, very high contrast or all of these combined.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 27, 2014 0 comments

Every photographer has a personal vision and a particular taste in composition, light, color and so on. For example, many photographers chose nature’s details simply to abstract the color and form they find. Others like to use extremely shallow depth of field—also called selective focus—so only a sliver of the subject is sharp while the rest of it is soft. People who are intrigued by the beauty, intricacy and complexity of nature usually shoot with the opposite approach. They want to reveal as much detail in the subjects as possible so those who view their work can appreciate the designs and the patterns in the images with tack sharp clarity.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Sep 30, 2014 0 comments
One of my favorite details to photograph is ice. It is as artistic and intriguing as anything you’ll encounter, and I never tire of the beautiful patterns and shapes I find. From ice crystals on a window (#1), to the impressive formations of glacial ice, such as (#2 and #3), the abstracts in ice that nature generates has been a life-long fascination for me.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Aug 19, 2014 0 comments

HDR stands for High Dynamic Range. What this refers to is the digital sensor’s ability (or lack of ability) to render good detail in both the highlights and the shadows in a photograph. Our eye/brain combination is extremely sophisticated, and as we look at a contrasty scene (such as a landscape in noon sunlight) the detail in the shadows and in the bright sunny areas is quite clear to us. A photograph will not look the same as we see it.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jul 21, 2014 1 comments
Everyone is insecure about getting the correct exposure. We have good reason to be insecure because too often we’ve experienced over- and underexposures when we didn’t expect it, and that leaves a lasting impression that exposure technique is a mysterious and elusive thing.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jul 21, 2014 0 comments
I’m sure that everyone who has ever owned a camera has taken pictures of flowers. It’s impossible not to. Flowers are too beautiful to resist, and there are so many species and varieties that you could devote your entire life to shooting nothing but flowers and hardly scratch the surface.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jul 21, 2014 0 comments
The beautiful designs and colors that can be found in the feathers of many species of birds offer wonderful photo opportunities. You can create frame-filling shots of unique patterns, and it’s also possible to make interesting arrangements of the feathers that become a unique art form unto itself.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jul 21, 2014 1 comments
Photography gives us the ability to freeze moments in time that are impossible for the human eye to see. The collision of a drop of water with a pool of water is an event that is intriguing to see, and without the aid of a camera and flash it would be impossible to study, appreciate and admire.

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