Film Photography Reviews

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John Wade Posted: Jul 13, 2015 1 comments

Ninety years ago, at the 1925 Leipzig Spring Fair in Germany, a camera was launched that was destined to change the face of photography. This was a time when it was still common for glass plates to be used in cameras, and those that took roll film were thought of as miniatures. So imagine the culture shock when a still photography camera was produced to take 35mm movie film.

Cynthia Boylan Posted: Aug 21, 2014 0 comments

Kodak Alaris has announced that—due to a steady decline in sales and customer usage—it is discontinuing the popular Kodak Professional BW400CN film.

Cynthia Boylan Posted: Aug 20, 2014 0 comments

Ilford Photo recently confirmed reports that there are no plans to discontinue production of their XP2 SUPER film. The product is in free supply globally from Ilford Photo distributors and retailers.

Cynthia Boylan Posted: Jul 30, 2014 0 comments

Some classic slide films never goes out of style. Or at least that’s what Lomography is hoping now that it’s now brought back Agfa CT Precisa color 35mm slide film. Best known the cool blue tone effect it produces in photos – such as the pumped up blues in images of skies – Agfa CT Precisa also has a fine grain quality and is available in ISO 100.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

Let’s be honest. One thing no one would have expected at photokina was a unique new black-and-white silver halide process. But that’s what we got. Well, not exactly brand new. It’s a revival of a technology that hasn’t been seen in decades, quite possibly not in the lifetime of many of our readers: direct reversal paper.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Sep 01, 2009 0 comments

Kodak’s new Ektar 100 is a film of unparalleled fine grain, very high sharpness, and excellent color rendition.

Joe Farace Posted: Sep 01, 2009 0 comments

At photokina in September 2008 Kodak announced its Professional Ektar film in 35mm format.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Film photographers are a cantankerous and ungrateful crew, often greeting revised films with suspicion and resentment instead of hope and pleasure. To some extent this is understandable, because they usually have to establish new development times and possibly new exposure indices, too; but the manufacturers' claimed improvements are usually honest, and without them...

Roger W. Hicks Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

There is a saying: remember, you are unique, just like every other human being. There is also the question of how far we are shaped by our genes, and how far by our upbringing.


Similar observations apply to infrared (IR) films. No two emulsions are quite the same (genetic uniqueness), and even with the same emulsion, each photographer has a different regime for...

George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

Last year we reported that Fujifilm had promised to be the "last man standing" when it came to maintaining and introducing new films, and we are happy to report that their promise has been kept. With a recently introduced Fujichrome Provia 400 and a return of Fujichrome Velvia 50, the company continues to upgrade its chrome film line with new emulsions that improve...

Steve Anchell Posted: May 01, 2007 0 comments

It is interesting that as digital imaging began its ascendancy film reached an all-time high in quality: hue, saturation, and sharpness, all of which meant digital had to try harder to be better. One of the films that stood out were the Kodak Professional Portra color negative emulsions, which in the last 10 years have become a favorite for photographers worldwide.



Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

The name says it all: Rollei's ScanFilm 400CN Pro is an ISO 400 color negative film (Kodak C-41 compatible) for scanning, rather than for wet printing. The big difference is that the orange mask, incorporated in almost all color negative films since the 1950s, is omitted: it just isn't needed if you are scanning.

On the other hand, the orange mask is no...

Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2007 0 comments

Walking through some of the halls at photokina, you could be forgiven for thinking digital photography has taken over. But look again and you can find plenty of silver halide waiting to be discovered: new films, chemicals and papers, updated enlargers, a new cold light source, and a new archival washer. Old friends, companies like Paterson Photographic, Condor, Tetenal, and...

Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

While digital, as expected, dominated the show, silver-halide materials were still to be found. These included three new films; faster films in single-use cameras; a new 35mm film support to reduce static (and therefore dust); new archival storage materials; the promise of new papers; and even--somewhat to my surprise--a lonely enlarger on one of the Chinese stands.

Dave Howard Posted: Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

There's no question that enlarger manufacturing is, shall we say, no longer a growth industry.

Ironically, it's the most technically advanced enlarger models that have been falling by the wayside. Their complements of sophisticated on-board electronics and baseboard analyzer/control modules have been superceded by desktop and laptop computers running...


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