Photo How To

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Ron Leach Posted: Jan 17, 2017 0 comments

Last fall Stanford University created quite a buzz when they enabled anyone to take their comprehensive digital imaging course online for free. Now thanks to web-based learning resource Alison, there’s a similar opportunity in which you can become a Harvard photography student at no cost!

Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jan 13, 2017 0 comments

People often ask me, “What sort of lens should I buy as my second lens?” and my answer is always the same: “What sort of pictures would you like to take?”  I’m getting that question a lot right now because a zillion people got new cameras over the holidays. There are so many options I’ve decided to deliver the answer in two installments. But first, let’s take a close look at that kit lens that came with your camera.

Josh Miller Posted: Jan 10, 2017 0 comments

While most photographers are packing their gear away for winter, an increasing number are finding winter to be their favorite season for photography. Photographers willing to brave the cold often find popular locations deserted, dramatic light, and fresh snow that makes scenes come alive. Whether it’s a once-in-a-lifetime trip to a destination like Yellowstone, Alaska, or Yosemite, or something closer to home, winter is a great time to get to know these locations in a much more intimate way and at slower pace. Here are nine reasons why winter is the best season to go out and shoot.

Scott Kelby Posted: Jan 06, 2017 0 comments

Got Questions About Photography? Professional Photographer and Photoshop Expert Scott Kelby Has Got Answers.

Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jan 05, 2017 0 comments

Remember Albert? Not Einstein—I mean the Albert that’s also known as “Snowtober.” If you lived on the East Coast in October 2011 you remember Albert as the freak Halloween snowstorm that left more than three million homes and businesses without power. Talk about Trick or Treat. One thing that we all should have learned from that painful experience is what all Boy Scouts know: Be Prepared. 

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Ron Leach Posted: Jan 05, 2017 0 comments

Last month we showed you how to create better portraits by using a white balloon to soften the light from your camera’s pop-up flash. Now there are these five camera hacks to improve your photos with a simple plastic bag.

Dan Havlik Posted: Dec 29, 2016 0 comments

Time-lapse photography and time-lapse videos are still immensely popular and interest in them shows no signs of slowing down (so to speak). In fact, a spectacular time-lapse video of Chicago was the fifth most popular story on Shutterbug.com in 2016 and it’s easy to see why.

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Ron Leach Posted: Dec 27, 2016 0 comments

Want to elevate the quality of your photography with the gear you already own? It may sound too good to be true, but all you have to do is watch the following video tutorial from Canadian pro Peter McKinnon and that’s exactly what will happen.

Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Dec 23, 2016 0 comments

No time to conjure up a resolution for 2017? No problem! Here’s a seven-pack of readymade resolutions you can relate to, even if you’re already perfect in every way.

Ron Leach Posted: Dec 22, 2016 0 comments

Time-lapse videos are all the rage these days but they typically require specialized gear and technical expertise that is beyond the means and knowledge of many of us. In the six-minute tutorial below, you’ll learn how to create time-lapses yourself, using gear you likely already own.

Ron Leach Posted: Dec 19, 2016 0 comments

Shutterbug columnist Scott Kelby recently gave a great lecture on the ethics of portrait retouching, and offered some valuable tips on how to improve your people pictures without making your subjects look fake.

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Ron Leach Posted: Dec 16, 2016 0 comments

Peter McKinnon is an award-winning Canadian photographer, and like many pros he’s often had to rig something up in the field to solve a problem. In the quick video below, McKinnon shares eight simple hacks that can get you out of a bind in a hurry.

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Ron Leach Posted: Dec 16, 2016 0 comments

While everyone here probably has a good understanding of how to arrive at a proper exposure by manipulating aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings, a quick refresher is always helpful. The short video below provides just that and includes a few other important bits of technical advice on how to capture high quality photos.

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Seth Shostak Posted: Dec 09, 2016 0 comments

Depending on your photographic interests, depth of field—the range of distances over which your lens will be sharp—can affect you in either propitious or problematic ways. If you’re trying to isolate one face in a group, a shallow depth of field is just what you need. If you’re hoping to capture the drama of a racehorse beating down the track in your direction, then shallow depth of field can turn much of the equine into a befuddling brown blur, no matter how high your shutter speed.

Scott Kelby Posted: Dec 09, 2016 0 comments

Got Questions About Photography? Professional Photographer and Photoshop Expert Scott Kelby Has Got Answers.

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