Pro Techniques

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Ralph J. Adkins Posted: Apr 01, 2007 0 comments

My life in photography changed one fall morning at the Frederick County Fair. A numbness on my right side indicated that I was joining the more than 600,000 people nationwide who suffer from strokes each year.

Thankfully, others around me recognized the first signs of my stroke and rushed me to a nearby hospital. During my 25-day hospital stay, I had ample time to...

Steve Bedell Posted: Apr 01, 1999 0 comments

Ah, Palm Beach. Just the mention of the name brings images of wealth and power to mind. Exotic cars, palatial estates, beautiful people, exclusive stores, and there's so much more--crystal skies, blue-green waters, the Intercoastal Waterway, yachts...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 3 comments

“You need to establish a connection with the food in front of the camera,” observes New York-based food photographer Francesco Tonelli (www.francescotonelli.com). “I can do a better job photographing a dish when I can picture myself eating it. That’s the frame of mind I need to be in so that I can capture the...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Sep 01, 1999 0 comments

"When showing your
portfolio it is a good idea to offer up a variety of choices--some verticals,
some horizontals, some wides, and some tight details."

...

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Daryl Hawk Posted: Nov 01, 2008 1 comments

The brilliant, ever-elusive emerald green and red quetzal. Mist enshrouded cloud forests that evoke a mysterious and eerie beauty. The melodic song of the bellbird. Howler monkeys calling to each other in their distinctive, bellowing way. These are just some of the images that describe the lovely Central American country of Costa Rica.

For over 25 years I have...

Steve Bedell Posted: Oct 01, 2003 0 comments

My strong point has always been natural light. When clients call me about weddings, I tell them I am a "natural light specialist." I love shooting outdoor portraits and have trained myself to "see the light" in the locations that...

Steve Bedell Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Like most photographers, I like to play around and constantly explore Photoshop. But I'm a businessman, too, so I need to be careful about how much time I spend in front of the computer. The more time I spend there, the less I have for taking photos and marketing my services, and that's where I make money. So I've always adopted the philosophy of getting it right...

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Josh Miller Posted: Jun 13, 2013 1 comments
At my workshops and lectures I am often asked by photographers how I am able to get sharp images at slow shutter speeds out of the affordable 70-300mm zoom I use for backpacking while they are unable to get sharp images with their 70-200 f/2.8 pro lenses. It is true that when it comes to lenses, the price tag does match the quality in terms of durability and sharpness at wide apertures. But by the time my carry-along backpacking lens is stopped down to f/8, it is nearly impossible to tell the difference between photos taken with it and images taken with the most expensive pro lenses. Honestly, the lack of sharpness in photos has less to do with the tele lens you are using than it might seem and more to do with long lens technique.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

Whenever you place a call to tech support—for any reason—take notes. Get names and of course dates and jot down a summary of all conversations. Nine times out of 10, when a customer complains about the behavior of a tech support agent, the conversation begins “I don’t know who I was talking to but…”

When you’re on hold and hear: “Your call...

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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 1999 0 comments

"The tone he produces on rough platinotype paper by skillful printing and carefully aged mercury baths cannot be reproduced by any mechanical process."
--George Bernard Shaw on the photographs of Frederick Evans

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jul 21, 2014 1 comments
Everyone is insecure about getting the correct exposure. We have good reason to be insecure because too often we’ve experienced over- and underexposures when we didn’t expect it, and that leaves a lasting impression that exposure technique is a mysterious and elusive thing.
Blaine Harrington Posted: Aug 15, 2014 0 comments

Years ago I took a photograph of prayer flags at a Buddhist monastery in Bhutan, and as I was shooting the image I wished I could also shoot video to record the movement of the flags and the sound they made as they danced in the wind.

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Josh Miller Posted: Aug 23, 2013 Published: Jul 01, 2013 32 comments
In these days of HDR, Lightroom, and Photoshop, is there still any point in carrying around Graduated Neutral Density (GND) filters? Often at photographic overlooks I hear photographers banging away with their cameras, shooting multiple exposures for future HDR images, while I nail the same scene in a single shot. More than once I have had one of these photographers scoff at me for using my “old school” GND filter, asking, “Ever heard of HDR?” While I am a firm believer in using all the tools available to me, including HDR, I feel that HDR is either unnecessary or won’t work in situations where multiple images are not possible, such as an action shot.
Gregory Heisler Posted: Mar 25, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 1 comments
Widely regarded as “a photographer’s photographer,” Gregory Heisler has been described as having “the mind of a scientist, the heart of a journalist, and the eye of an artist.” Known for his candor, humor, and generosity as a teacher, he is able to convey the most complex photographic concepts simply and elegantly. In the long-awaited Gregory Heisler: 50 Portraits (Amphoto Books, October 22, 2013, $40) he takes us on a guided tour of his innovative editorial images and iconic portraits, engagingly illuminated by his insightful and highly personal perspective.

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