Pro Techniques

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Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Aug 01, 2009 0 comments

Joe McNally is an expert at lighting big jobs with small flashes. Besides being a successful commercial photographer, he also spends a great deal of time teaching. His new book, The Hot Shoe Diaries, is a virtual how-to for setting up complex lighting using Nikon SB flashes.

Normally, when we do interviews like this, we also discuss in detail how some of the photographer’s...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: May 28, 2014 1 comments
I have always been fascinated by a photographer’s ability to turn a common subject into a work of art. Being a photographer means seeing the artistic potential in the elements that surround us on a daily basis. I travel all over the world seeking out amazing things to shoot, but I also find them at home—in the kitchen, in my backyard or even in my office. It’s always an exciting discovery to work with a subject to which I never gave a second thought, and then one day it turns into something that is visually arresting.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Sep 16, 2014 0 comments

You’d wash your car inside and out before you tried to sell it, right? At the least you’d vacuum the dog hair from the back seat. Why do so many people offer downright dirty cameras and lenses for sale at online auction websites? While you cannot (and should not) remove signs of wear, you can easily make used gear clean and presentable.

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Steve Bedell Posted: Feb 01, 2003 0 comments

Jack Holowitz

Jack Holowitz is the male half of the incredibly talented team of Jack and Nancy Holowitz from Springfield, Massachusetts. Nancy is known for her sensitive portraiture, and Jack has gained a great reputation for his eye-popping black and white work that includes nudes and...

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Jay McCabe Posted: Jul 01, 2005 0 comments

"If you define your creativity by what the market wants, you're dead before you start."

When James Balog traveled to Banda Aceh, Indonesia, in January, he knew there was little chance of his photographs being picked up by newspapers or magazines. The tsunami, which struck the region on December 26, had been well covered by the media. But as a photographer...

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Jack Neubart Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

In a career spanning 40 years, Jeff Smith's work as an industrial and corporate photographer is well-known to many. Not too long ago we'd find him going to a job site with literally almost a half-ton of lighting gear, along with a Mamiya RZ67 and heavy lenses, not to mention countless packs of film and Polaroids. Over the years the market has shifted, technology has...

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Jay McCabe Posted: Sep 01, 2005 0 comments

It starts with the website, which is a key element in wedding photographer John Solano's business. John's goal is to be pre-sold before the client even meets him. "The ideal is that I don't have to show them a picture," John says. "I do that, of course, but the work kind of sells itself, and if they've seen it already, the selling is...

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Lou Jacobs Jr. Posted: Apr 01, 2011 2 comments

When the Virginia Tourism Corporation needed a series of illustrations, to help publicize tourism with imaginative style, photographer Keith Lanpher, based in Norfolk, was chosen for the job. This was a location project that called for seven days of shooting with numerous models as well as a passel of dogs and a large smoke machine.

Lanpher knew it would...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 01, 1998 0 comments

Big. Everything about digital imaging with medium format film boils down to the joys and delights of working with large image files. A frame of medium format film dwarfs a 35mm negative or slide and while this bigness produces more image quality, it also...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Oct 01, 2000 0 comments

Imagine this.
You are preparing prints for a highly respected exhibition. It is now
in the fifth consecutive day of rain. You process the prints in your usual
way--everything seems to be going well throughout the entire chemical...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

Being a photographer for 30 years has helped me to become more acutely aware of my surroundings. I find myself at all times watching how light pours over faces, how compositions just jump out at me, and how micro landscapes abound everywhere in daily life. So, it was with great surprise one day that I noticed just how blissfully unaware I was of my surroundings, and that maybe my...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

One of the things that makes a photograph successful is that attention is directed to the subject. This can be done with good lighting, muted backgrounds, or graphic design. An important design element that directs our attention into the heart of a picture is called a leading line. This is a line that usually begins at the bottom of the composition and extends into the heart of the scene...

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Jason Schneider Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), the world-renowned center of imaging tech, research, and photographic education, and Leica Camera, acclaimed for its legendary cameras and outstanding optics, proclaimed May 6, 2008 as Leica Day. The daylong event, hosted by RIT at its impressively large modern campus, was celebrated with speeches, lectures, tours, slide shows, seminars...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 25, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 30 comments
The intriguing thing about lightpainting is you never know exactly what you’re going to get. And whatever you get, you won’t get it again. That’s part of the technique’s appeal: you’re creating a one-of-a-kind photograph.

Simply, a lightpainting photo is an image made with a handheld, constant light source in a dark room or environment. The camera’s sensor captures only what you choose to illuminate. Lightpainting images can range from relatively simple to fairly complicated. Striking photos can be created indoors with nothing more than a still life subject, a tabletop to put it on, and a small LED penlight to light it. Or you can think big: how about a mega-powerful spotlight illuminating prairie land in the Grand Tetons or a mesa in Monument Valley?

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Lorraine A. DarConte Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

A. T. (Tom) Willett and Jeff Smith are commercial photographers whose clients include Humana (insurance), Getty Assignments, Tucson Guide, More Magazine, the Arizona Public Service (APS), and the University of Arizona. The duo met more than 20 years ago while attending Pima Community College in Tucson.

Both moved to the small city when they were young (Willett from...

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