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Josh Miller Posted: Jan 10, 2017 0 comments

While most photographers are packing their gear away for winter, an increasing number are finding winter to be their favorite season for photography. Photographers willing to brave the cold often find popular locations deserted, dramatic light, and fresh snow that makes scenes come alive. Whether it’s a once-in-a-lifetime trip to a destination like Yellowstone, Alaska, or Yosemite, or something closer to home, winter is a great time to get to know these locations in a much more intimate way and at slower pace. Here are nine reasons why winter is the best season to go out and shoot.

Josh Miller Posted: Jul 12, 2016 0 comments

When it comes to bird photography, no species is more majestic and more sought after than the bald eagle. Its status as America’s national bird wasn’t always a sure bet (Benjamin Franklin wanted the turkey). Bald eagles also nearly went extinct during the 20th century from their eggshells thinning due to the proliferation of DDT. But today as a result of aggressive protections under the Endangered Species Act, as well as the banning of DDT, these beautiful birds have made a dramatic recovery.

Josh Miller Posted: May 27, 2016 0 comments

While nothing beats practice and time spent in the field waiting for perfect light, there are a few essential tools that should be found in every landscape photographer’s bag. These photo accessories might not be as exciting as that new camera we all dream of, but they will help you take your photography to the next level much quicker than upping your megapixel count.

Josh Miller Posted: May 20, 2016 1 comments

There is no place on the bucket lists of more landscape photographers than California’s Yosemite National Park. Nowhere else in the world can a photographer find such a concentration of waterfalls, dramatic rock formations, enormous trees, great light, and easy access shooting. Who hasn’t seen amazing shots of El Capitan and Half Dome and thought, “I need to shoot there someday.”

Josh Miller Posted: Feb 12, 2016 0 comments

While everyone’s definition of “extreme” is a little different, the one thing that can be said of extreme outdoor photography is it involves leaving the car far behind and dealing with whatever difficulties present themselves without running for cover. To help get you ready for your next extreme shoot, here are my seven most important tools for working in the wild under tough conditions.

Josh Miller Posted: Aug 27, 2015 0 comments

Have you ever wished you could photograph colorful frogs, exotic birds, and tropical forest landscapes all in the same day? If so, then a trip to the tropics may be in order for your next photo adventure.

Josh Miller Posted: Jul 01, 2015 0 comments

I think I speak for nearly every photographer when I say going to a new location excites me, especially if it is one I have dreamed about for years. We all dream of these once-in-a-lifetime photo adventures. But the truth is for most photographers, the majority of our shooting is actually done in locations that are closer to home and allow us to return more regularly.

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Josh Miller Posted: Jun 19, 2015 0 comments

If I had to choose a single lens to use for the rest of my mountain life, without question it would be a wide-angle zoom. In my case, it would be Nikon’s AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G ED VR wide-angle zoom lens. (But anything similar would probably do the trick as well.) I would choose this over a fixed lens, which would be slightly sharper, because it offers versatility to shoot both landscapes and action with more focal lengths.

Josh Miller Posted: Jun 01, 2015 1 comments

Telephotos have always been bread-and-butter lenses for photographers shooting everything from commercial and sports to wildlife and landscapes. The ability to separate a subject against its background or pull in a distant scene has made telephoto lenses a staple in nearly every camera bag around the world.

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Josh Miller Posted: Jan 12, 2015 0 comments
Every so often I find myself running out of gas and feeling the accumulated effects of days of traveling, photographing, teaching, editing, and writing. While it isn’t always easy to self-diagnose being overworked, it is easy to see the productivity and creativity of one’s photography decreasing. It is at these times I find I need to take some time away from “work” and head into the mountains to help recharge my personal batteries and get the creative juices flowing again.

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