Pro Techniques

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Maynard Switzer Posted: Dec 05, 2012 2 comments
Travel is, by definition, motion, and among the photos I always look for on my travels are the ones that capture people in motion. For me motion falls into two categories: one I call sports movement, the other fashion movement. Sports movement is the bobsledder on his run down the track that results in a photo that’s a rush of color and a blur of background; fashion movement is motion that’s almost stopped—“almost” because the person’s activity is implied in the captured movement, and that’s what I do most of the time.
Roger W. Hicks Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Roger W. Hicks, All Rights Reserved

We fly less than we used to. Terrorists don't worry us: realistically, flying is still far safer than driving. But we don't like the hassle, three-hour check-ins, restricted carryons, frequent x-rays, and endless security checks. In that sense, the terrorists have made us (and many other people) change...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Sep 01, 2009 0 comments

Well, things have gotten much easier with Hahnemhle’s Gallerie Wrap. Available in Standard and Professional systems, the kits include everything you need to create a gallery wrap canvas print in about 5 minutes.

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

It's challenging to get the right combination of true color, composition, and light playing on figures who are moving in unprecedented positions at a rapid rate of speed. The dancers are theatrical, sassy, and innovative, and this is where Boston photographer Jeffrey Dunn shines as he photographed America's Ballroom Challenge for Public Television's presentation...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

Just when I thought I'd seen her at her best, Lois Greenfield steps it up a notch and amazes me once again with her sharp eye for the body in motion. "Sharp" is the operative word here. Many photographers, myself among them, may accept a little blur in a fast-moving subject. Not Greenfield. She learned long ago that if sharpness and crisp detail are important to...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

One of the traditional compositional guidelines that many artists and photographers adhere to is that a subject’s movement should go toward the center of the frame. You can see this method of composing an image in the photo of the frigate bird (#1) that I placed on the left side of the frame; it is flying toward the imaginary vertical center line of the image. Similarly, I placed the tall...

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Jay Abend Posted: Dec 01, 2000 0 comments

You're all familiar with Murphy's Law--Anything that can possibly go wrong will go wrong. Certainly being a working photographer is a great way to see Murphy's Law in action on nearly a daily basis. While I pride myself on being prepared for every...

Jeff Howe Posted: Jul 18, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments
Last year, I decided to take on a challenge focusing on the unique natural beauty associated with wildfires in a Florida scrub ecosystem, one of the most rare ecosystems in the state. Florida is no stranger to wildfires. Nationwide, Florida has the second highest number of wildfires annually. In 2011, it was estimated that 300,000 acres of land was burned due to over 4800 wildfires. My project was centered at Indrio Savannahs Preserve, where a 120-acre wildfire was ignited by lightning in March of 2013.
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Jay McCabe Posted: Mar 15, 2013 Published: Feb 01, 2013 1 comments
Bill Pekala, head of Nikon Professional Services, came to the US Open at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, New York, last August to run the NPS operation at the matches. Sports events can be the ultimate proving ground for camera gear, and one of NPS’s primary roles is providing their member professional photographers with the assurance of dedicated on-site support.
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Steven Rosen Posted: Oct 31, 2011 Published: Sep 01, 2011 1 comments
It was 9pm on a Saturday night in April of 2008, and I had spent the day, as I spend so many days, at my computer, editing and retouching. My husband was out of town and I was feeling antsy and bored when an e-mail arrived with a list of goings-on in my Brooklyn neighborhood. Sandwiched between a Jewish Singles social and our community theater’s latest production was a listing for a “Dances of Vice” costume party at the Montauk Club. I sat up straight. The Montauk Club is modeled after a Venetian palazzo and I’d long admired the exterior. This was my chance to finally see what was inside.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2009 0 comments

Working at Spiratone, Nick Koudis (www.koudis.com) began his photographic career designing many of those wonderful gizmos made popular by my mentor, the world-renowned Norman Rothschild. Koudis brought his knack for developing clever and ingenious gadgets with him when he opened his first studio in New York City over 25 years ago. Back then we...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

The noise that appears in digital photographs is the visual equivalent of the static you hear in radio signals. Most digital cameras add some level of noise to captured images.

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Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 01, 2011 1 comments

Most of us know about making outdoor portraits using the small fill flash on our cameras. But these photos have a “look” that tells everyone they were “made with flash.” They have a flat, often harsh look to them. A more sophisticated technique that can be accessed with many new cameras is the use of off-camera flash; you can even use multiple units controlled directly from the camera. I use...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Jul 01, 2008 1 comments

Photojournalist Kevin Moloney grew up in Greeley, Colorado, amid the hub of professional cowboys and "bucking broncos." Although his father, a professional sports photographer, found inspiration in the sport of rodeo, this did not interest his son. It was the hard news and cultural stories that drew him to a news service from National Geographic and to magazines like...

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Blaine Harrington Posted: Oct 15, 2013 Published: Sep 01, 2013 1 comments
I learned photography in the film days, and when the huge change to digital came along, I changed not only my gear but the way I see. I used to have to see in terms of very specific criteria of what would work within the ISO range of my film and what the film could record in terms of light and shadow. Low ISOs meant I couldn’t get enough depth of field, or a tripod was needed, or I had to light something because there wasn’t enough information in pictures that had incredible shadow detail. High ISOs often meant an unacceptable level of grain and bad color rendition. As a result I passed up a lot of situations that got my attention but were beyond the capability of my film to capture.

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