Pro Techniques

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Sep 01, 2010 0 comments

The Yale University Art Gallery and Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library announced the joint acquisition of the Lee Friedlander Archive and 2000 of the photographer’s master prints. With this acquisition, the Yale University Art Gallery becomes the largest holder of Friedlander’s work by any museum, and the Beinecke Library becomes home to the preliminary work and...

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Lou Jacobs Jr. Posted: May 24, 2013 Published: Apr 01, 2013 1 comments
In the annals of American photography the images made by Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographers in the 1930s and 1940s are famous. Over a dozen men and women captured a variety of life and work styles during the Great Depression. Their pictures, distributed to news media and other outlets, illustrate how people were dealing with the hard times of the Great Depression, and were used to justify programs for relief and aid.
Maria Piscopo Posted: Sep 10, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 1 comments
Does using social media as a marketing tool work for photographers? That’s what we aimed to find out by interviewing five photographers who have successfully used this particular marketing technique in very specific ways. Unlike advertising and direct mail, where you send out your material and wait for a response, and sales calls, which are more time-consuming, social media is a unique technique that can breed success, but only when properly and fully utilized. Many thanks to our photographers for taking the time and attention to share their thoughts and experiences (websites at end of column): Liz Cowie, Clark Dever, David Alan Kogut, Brad Mangin, and Chuck St. John.
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Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Apr 01, 2007 1 comments

Capturing the beauty of artwork with a camera has always been a challenge. Sure, it's easy to take a picture of a picture, but to reproduce the full range of colors, textures, and tones that will carry the power of the original, that is a challenge. There is a growing demand for high-quality digital files for juried shows, portfolios, and even for limited edition inkjet...

Harold Davis Posted: May 30, 2013 Published: May 01, 2013 1 comments
Photographing Waterdrops is a beautifully illustrated how-to photography guide that serves as both a technical tutorial and visual photography inspiration. Its collection of imagery explores the world within the tiniest droplets of water. Written by award-winning photographer Harold Davis, author of more than 30 books including the bestselling title, Photographing Flowers: Exploring Macro Worlds with Harold Davis, this photography book is intended to offer a fresh, creative perspective into the dynamic possibilities of natural waterdrop photography. Davis draws from his professional expertise and artistic perspective to offer advice on capturing extraordinary waterdrop compositions. Readers learn how to use light and reflections to their advantage, which tools and equipment work best for macro photography, and how to perfect their waterdrop shots both before and after shooting.
Lorin R. Robinson Posted: May 02, 2014 Published: Mar 01, 2014 0 comments
Caving,” “spelunking,” “potholing.” Whatever you call it, this subterranean activity is not for everyone. There’s even a phobia that keeps some out of caves—speluncaphobia. Then, of course, there’s fear of darkness (achluophobia) and the rather more common claustrophobia—fear of no escape from small or enclosed spaces.
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Mike Ware Posted: Mar 01, 2011 1 comments

For its first 160 years, photography was based on silver. Effectively all camera negatives have to be made of this metal because only silver halides are fast enough to record analog chemical images “instantaneously”—or even in a couple of minutes. But printing from the negative need not be speedy, so the door is open to several slower photochemical processes for printmaking.

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Jan 01, 2006 Published: Jan 01, 2007 0 comments

How do you translate an idea into an image? Or convert words into a photograph? How can a picture create a sense of fear and is this fear something we are born with? Perfect pitch... How might you define this phenomenon with your camera? Or hypergraphia, the compulsive need to write?

These were among the puzzles that confronted Cary Wolinsky for his story on...

Suzanne Driscoll Posted: May 14, 2013 Published: Apr 01, 2013 1 comments
Actor Richard Gere is best known for his roles in over 40 films, but few may be aware he is also an avid photographer and collector. Taking pictures on his many trips to India was always more of a personal project, until photography book and exhibition designer Elizabeth Avedon happened to notice a 3-foot stack of beautiful 8x10 photos in his loft. “A lot of these photographs I didn’t show anyone because it was such a private experience for me,” Gere recalls. “I had no interest in sharing them.” Fortunately, Avedon was able to convince him they needed to be seen, and these and other photos have been exhibited around the world and published in his book, Pilgrim.
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Hugh O. Smith Posted: Nov 01, 2009 1 comments

Pinhole photography, long popular in Japan and China, has caught on with a vengeance here in the US.

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 29, 2011 Published: Jun 01, 2011 1 comments
Years ago Dale Huncovsky, owner of the only grocery in Cuba, Kansas, had a heart bypass operation. Since then several men from town show up once a week at Dale’s store to unload the semi that brings the week’s supply of groceries. That’s how the personal and the practical play out in Cuba.
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David B. Brooks Posted: Jun 01, 2009 1 comments

I don’t know of any other film brand that also became the title of a hit song like Paul Simon’s “Kodachrome,” released in 1973.

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Nov 01, 2006 0 comments

It's impossible to be a serious digital photographer without learning at least a little bit about computers. Some people take to computer technology like kids take to dirt, but many never get beyond e-mail and Photoshop. Don't get me wrong--that's not bad--but when the need to upgrade arises, the folks who are short on computer skills sometimes think...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jun 01, 2010 2 comments

In the entry hall of our house, there is a picture of two young sisters. When the picture was taken, Marion was 14 years old and Helen was 7. That was in the mid-1920s. Marion was my mother; Helen, my aunt. Both are dead now.

The oldest picture in my family album is probably the portrait of Franklin Corbin. He died in Andersonville prison during the Civil War.

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