Pro Techniques

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

"The Great Swamp was a treat," observed one of the photographers from the American Museum of Natural History's photo studio after returning from a trip to photograph this New Jersey marshland. "Nothing like slogging around in chest waders and dodging mosquitoes (unsuccessfully, I might add) for four hours in really nice smelling swamp water," he...

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Jack Neubart Posted: May 04, 2011 Published: Apr 01, 2011 5 comments

Automotive photography involves more than cars, although these vehicles make up the bulk of this genre. Automotive can also mean motorcycles and practically any motorized conveyance that hits the road. Tackling these vehicles may appear overwhelming at first, but not to veteran automotive photographer Richard Izui.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2010 1 comments

“I can trace my roots in photography back to when I was a student at the Ontario College of Art (Toronto),” Andrew Eccles recalls. “But there was one problem: back then, I found it intimidating to approach people with the camera, so I avoided photographing them.

“Then I came to New York and started studying magazines such as Rolling Stone, and, through a...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2009 0 comments

Shooting professionally since the 1970s, San Diego-based Marshall Harrington (www.marshallharrington.com) has employed various processes and techniques, film and digital, that give him a competitive edge. In my book, Location Lighting Solutions (Amphoto), Harrington described his work as “visual semiotics,” explaining...

Maria Piscopo Posted: Jun 28, 2013 Published: May 01, 2013 7 comments
I have always been a big supporter of joining and participating in professional groups. The growth of my career as a photo rep, teacher, and author all came from joining and participating in groups that brought together like-minded individuals. For photographers looking to enhance or initiate their careers there are numerous professional associations worthy of attention.
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Steve Bedell Posted: May 06, 2014 Published: Mar 01, 2014 0 comments
Mention the name Jerry Ghionis to any wedding photographer and you will immediately see respect and admiration in their eyes. Jerry shot to prominence by winning the International Wedding Album of the Year Award at Wedding Portrait Photographers International (WPPI) a record eight times and was also named by WPPI as one of the top five wedding photographers in the world. With a style that combines fashion, portraiture, and spontaneity, his work is instantly recognizable. Sought after by wedding clients from around the world, Jerry has expanded his base to become a wildly popular teacher and lecturer and now even a product developer. I even hear he does a mean karaoke but I’ve yet to witness that!
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Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Jan 31, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 5 comments
Chase Jarvis is one of a new breed of successful young photographers who’s at the top of his game. His use of social networking has brought him an enormous following while his exploration of radical business models is opening new markets. Best known for his lifestyle and sports images, the creative and financial success of his personal projects has earned him top corporate clients like Nikon, Reebok, and Microsoft.

Shutterbug: You have no formal training as a photographer, yet arguably you’re one of the top photographers working today. How’d you get there?

Chase Jarvis: I wish I could answer that in a sentence. I think maybe the shortest description is by being incredibly curious and very hardworking. And throw a whole bunch of luck in there, too. There’s a lot of timing and luck involved in anything I do.

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Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Feb 01, 2010 123 comments

David Hume Kennerly has led an amazing career as a photojournalist. In 1968 he photographed Robert Kennedy at the California presidential primary moments before he was gunned down at the Ambassador Hotel.

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Jay Abend Posted: Sep 01, 2001 0 comments

Last year I wrote about the need for every photographer, regardless of their ability, to have a current portfolio. In my business as a commercial photographer, a killer portfolio is a necessity. I received a few e-mails inquiring about the...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Feb 01, 2009 1 comments

The photographs of Philip Perkis come from his own inner world; they are quiet images that speak to us intimately. Presented in a recent show at the Alan Klotz Gallery in New York, many of them grace the pages of his new book The Sadness of Men, published by The Quantuck Lane Press.

Currently a teacher at Pratt Institute and the School of Visual Arts...

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Jay Abend Posted: Jan 01, 1998 0 comments

One of the claims often heard when talking about medium format cameras is, "With this camera you can get practically 4x5 quality." How realistic is that claim anyway? Let's face it, a 4x5 sheet of film has over three times the total real...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

When Canadian engineer Joseph Cacic designed and built a tripod in the late 1990s that would accommodate bird’s eye aerial images, Boston photographer Frank Siteman was among his first customers. For Siteman it was the perfect solution for the environmental photographs that he favors. Weighing 75 lbs and easy to roll, the tripod can be placed in a garden without disturbing any of the floras...

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Rick Sammon Posted: Jun 01, 2000 0 comments

Ever wonder what ingredients professional travel photographers use to make great on-location pictures? Here's my gourmet recipe.

Getting Ready To "Cook."...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

Sooner or later, you're going to be tempted to buy a product that's labeled "refurbished." It will probably be the lower price that attracts you--after all, there is one and only one reason to even consider "refurb" and that is to save money. Depending on where you shop, you may be led to believe that the refurbished item is as good as...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 21, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 1 comments
Who: Robert Beck, staff photographer for Sports Illustrated.
What: Infrared (IR) photography.
When: “The editors give me some leeway,” Robert says, “but I’m not going to be using it for a decisive putt.”
Where: Golf courses all over the world.
Why: Although the job calls for capture of the peak moment, the turning point, the key play, the tense concentration, the moment when the athlete’s body language gives it all away, there’s always the professional and personal challenge to do something different.
How: With a Nikon D700 modified for infrared photography.

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