Pro Techniques

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Staff Posted: Dec 10, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments
The New Art of Photographing Nature: An Updated Guide to Composing Stunning Images of Animals, Nature, and Landscapes (Amphoto Books, $29.99) is from world-renowned photographer Art Wolfe and writer and photo editor Martha Hill, with Tim Grey. In this revised edition, the text has been updated throughout to reflect the dramatic changes in photography since this classic was first released in 1993. More than 50% of the beautiful images are all new, and a new contributor, digital imaging expert Tim Grey, shares sidebars throughout offering tips on digital imaging and processing.
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Fredrik Froman Posted: Jun 01, 2009 0 comments

When most people are getting their best sleep and the early birds are cuddling in their warm beds or having their first cup of coffee, low-light photographers get their best pictures. There is nothing like standing in a big city in the middle of the night before the city wakes up and shooting low-light photography. I love the feeling of experiencing something not everybody sees. If you...

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Lorin R. Robinson Posted: Feb 06, 2013 Published: Jan 01, 2013 1 comments
The Ojibways, inhabitants of the Lake Superior Region for some five centuries, had a name for tribal bands that lived on the south and north shores of the lake they called Keche Gumme. They were called Keche-gumme-wi-ne-wug—Men of the Great Water. If there is one non-Native American who deserves to be an honorary member of those lake dwellers, it’s nature photographer Craig Blacklock.
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Lorraine A. DarConte Posted: Mar 09, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 14 comments
Cristian Movila, who was born in Bucharest, Romania, in 1983, has four sisters whom he says taught him all about “emotions,” a trait he’s been able to successfully incorporate into his work. He also says he was drawn to the arts early in life. In elementary school, he learned to play the piano and the trumpet. Later, in grade school, he became interested in journalism while hosting a children’s radio program. Although he studied electronic engineering at the University of Polytechnic, Bucharest, over time he found himself increasingly concerned with social issues, and so he decided to become a photographer so he could capture the complexities of life “in a snapshot.”
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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 09, 2013 Published: Jun 01, 2013 1 comments
“Whether the client is advertising a travel destination or a product, such as clothing or sports apparel, I strive to set up the shoot with talent that’s the best fit for the ad,” lifestyle photographer Dennis Welsh proclaims. “That’s what makes the shot and the client’s message believable. That’s what sells it to potential customers. For instance, if I’m shooting for a ski company or a ski resort, I want to find skiers who can easily do what I want them to do. That conveys a sense of truth and honesty. If you start with skiers who are not convincing, you start with a deficit. In that case, you have to do the best you can with what you’ve got. If I’ve got great talent and a great location, a lot of things are already working in my favor.”
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Rosalind Smith Posted: Feb 01, 2008 1 comments

As a documentary photographer Eli Reed focuses on subjects that have deep meaning for him. A member of Magnum since 1983, Reed is a highly respected still photographer as well as a noted member of the motion picture industry where he works with some of Hollywood's top directors, including John Singleton and Spike Lee. Photojournalist Dirck Halstead wrote of Reed, "Eli...

Lou Jacobs Jr. Posted: Nov 26, 2013 Published: Oct 01, 2013 0 comments
Gerald Hill has been involved in photography for over 37 years and often explored creative work while employed in the aerospace industry in Wichita, Kansas. In 2003 he began to exhibit in several galleries that sold his landscape images, many shot in western states. Hill recognized that a grounding in art is essential to making effective photographs, and he made time to take classes with artist Charles H. Sanderson, who encouraged him to consider photography as his means of self-expression, and to learn the basics of visualization so he could capture his subjects with greater impact. As Hill went deeper into his studies he saw results: his compositions became both more dynamic and more personal.
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Rosalind Smith Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

They call him the picture taker, a humble phrase for a man whose every image is a small miracle. His name is Ken Elkins, retired chief photographer for The Anniston Star in rural Alabama. His new book, appropriately titled Picture Taker (published by The University of Alabama Press), transports us from life as we know it to a world most of us will never encounter.

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Lou Jacobs Jr. Posted: Oct 23, 2012 Published: Sep 01, 2012 8 comments
Mobile, Alabama-based photographer Laura Cantrell says, “Mothers trust me to capture and preserve the magic in childhood.” Her photography business in Mobile was inherited from her father who sent his 17-year-old daughter on her first assignment to photograph a train wreck with a 4x5 Speed Graphic. By assisting her dad at weddings and shooting portraits she learned lighting, posing, and how to please clients.
Lou Jacobs Jr. Posted: Aug 17, 2012 Published: Jul 01, 2012 3 comments
Orest Macina says he is “a self-taught photographer interested in painting with light to capture the beauty all around us in vivid colors.” He holds a Ph.D. in Theoretical Computational Chemistry, and has worked in the pharmaceutical field. He first became interested in photography in high school, though his interest lagged through college, graduate school, career, and marriage.
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Lorraine A. DarConte Posted: Oct 01, 2007 1 comments

If life is a series of experiences, then travel/documentary photographer Robert Leon is indeed living a very full and interesting one. As a young boy, Leon was mesmerized by the world depicted in his parents' National Geographic and LIFE magazines. "I would dream of going to these places and was fascinated by the different cultures," he says. Eventually, after...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

The first time I saw some of Thom Rouse's work, I was stunned. It was so artistically and technically excellent I had to stop and study it for a while, just like you do when visiting a gallery. That's why I had to share it with you. Rouse is a portrait and wedding photographer who regards digital photography as not just an advancement of conventional photography but as...

Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Apr 04, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments
Vincent van Gogh once said, “Stars are the souls of dead poets, but to become a star you have to die.” Vivian Maier (1926 - 2009) was an amateur photographer who had no desire to share her work with anyone during her life, and kept a treasure trove of over 100,000 prints, negatives, and films in five storage lockers in Chicago. By several twists of fate, they ended up in the hands of a few collectors who recognized their unique quality, and are now shown in books, documentaries, museums, and galleries throughout the world.
Lorin R. Robinson Posted: Apr 11, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments
It is probably true that a photographer, through almost single-minded devotion to a place, can help make it known, understood, and appreciated. But the converse is also true. A place can make a photographer. Its beauty, its landscape, its human dimensions, its impact on the creative spirit can mold or shape a photographer—both as artist and person. That’s been the experience of fine art photographer William Davis in his 45-year symbiotic relationship with Northern New Mexico and the small town of Taos.
Jim Corbran Posted: Apr 07, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments
The idea for Phil Pantano’s photographic series, “The American Worker,” walked into his office at a local steel mill in Lackawanna, New York, where Pantano holds a day job as a computer analyst. The man who came through the door was Jay “Elvis” Borzillieri, a fourth-generation steelworker whose father died in the mill. It doesn’t matter to the story what Elvis stopped in for that day, but when Pantano looked into his face a flash went off in his mind.

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