Pro Techniques

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Moose Peterson Posted: Jun 13, 2013 1 comments
Filing the frame with the critter isn’t required for great wildlife photography. Reflecting on how I first slanted my wildlife photography in this direction, it has its roots in the first lens I had to shoot wildlife. I started with a Vivitar 400mm f/5.6 on an old Minolta that was soon replaced with a Nikon 400mm f/5.6 on an F2. That 400mm was my main lens for a long time and it taught me lessons about wildlife photography that I still depend on to this day.
Filed under
Steve Anchell Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

Adobe Photoshop users soon come to realize that almost every technique can be done in more ways than one.

Filed under
Jay Abend Posted: Sep 01, 1999 0 comments

One of the most difficult obstacles to overcome for the aspiring studio photographer is the lack of a proper space to shoot. Spare bedrooms, garages, attics, and basements have all been transformed into makeshift studios, and most lack adequate space to...

Filed under
Joseph A. Dickerson Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

Last year I wrote about one of my favorite software programs, Panorama Maker 3. The folks at ArcSoft have unveiled an updated Version 4 ($39.99 new, $24.99 upgrade), so I thought I'd give it a try.

Version 4 is more intuitive than Version 3, and that's really saying something. The first couple of panoramas I tried went together easily, but I noticed that...

Lorin R. Robinson Posted: Oct 25, 2013 Published: Sep 01, 2013 0 comments
He stands in about 3 feet of roiling surf, wetsuit jersey glistening from repeated dunkings. The sky above Oahu’s North Shore is deep blue. Undertow currents grasp his legs—eroding sand beneath his swim fins—as water rushes seaward to build the next huge wave. He holds his bulky waterproof camera housing tightly, faces west toward the setting sun and checks the long tether attached to his wrist. He turns his head to watch the wave rise ever higher—a towering blue-green monster that’s starting to curl, white spume blowing off its top. He braces himself as best he can against the forces raging around him, points the camera toward the golden Hawaiian sunset, and waits as tons of water begins to curl over him, forming a tube. At what he hopes is the right instant, he fires off several shots and prepares to be pounded and rag-dolled by the massive wave.
Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

John Conn is telling me about the Arnolds.

"They're the ones who look at the photos and say, `I'll be back.' Trust me, they won't." Then there are the pointers. "Pointers never buy," he says, "and buyers never point. If someone points, I don't get up and walk over." Other sure-fire indications...

Filed under
Chuck DeLaney Posted: May 30, 2014 Published: Apr 01, 2014 0 comments
Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris, on view at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art through May 4, 2014, features nearly 100 photographs and marks the first American retrospective of this Parisian-born (1813-1879) member of photography’s very first generation. Marville’s photographs are remarkable as images and also provide invaluable documentation of the transformation of Paris from a medieval city to the world capital we know today. The show is highly recommended for photographers, students of history, and everyone who loves the “City of Light.”
Filed under
Chuck DeLaney Posted: Jul 15, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments
A comprehensive retrospective of photographs by Garry Winogrand (1928 - 1984) made its debut last year at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and will be on view at Washington’s National Gallery of Art (March 2 - June 8) and New York’s Metropolitan Museum (June 27 - September 21). The show then travels to Paris and Madrid. It includes pictures that became well known during Winogrand’s lifetime and others that he himself never even viewed. See it if you can because it raises provocative questions for every photographer and, as the show wends its way, gives critics an opportunity to rethink his career.
Filed under
Phillip Andrews Posted: Sep 01, 2007 0 comments

There is no doubt that a well-crafted lith print is, to borrow an oft-used phrase from my father-in-law, "a thing of beauty is (therefore) a joy forever." The trick, for the experienced and occasional darkroom users alike, is the production of such a print. I have always had difficulty getting consistency with the production of my prints. Despite this frustration, my...

Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: May 28, 2014 2 comments
The pearlescent colors that appear in soap bubbles are endlessly fascinating if you take the time to look at them closely. It is chaos at its most beautiful—a random mix of color that, unfortunately, we can’t freeze with our mind to examine any one instant in time. With a camera and flash, however, we can capture these amazing works of art and examine every detail, even though each design lasts only milliseconds.
Filed under
David B. Brooks Posted: Jan 01, 2006 0 comments

There's one lens that's part of my 35mm/digital SLR system that I have used longest, continuously now for about 40 years. It is a homemade single-element soft-focus lens inspired by the Rodenstock Imagon lens for large format cameras. There are more images in my library of photographs made with this lens than any other. But why in this modern, high-tech world of...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

When we heard that David Alan Harvey was doing a book on women, it didn't seem like a surprising subject. A photojournalist with over 30 National Geographic stories to his credit, plus several books, we imagined that in the course of over 30 years of travel and photography he'd have many compelling images from which to choose. Not to mention current assignments that...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

The who, what, when, and where of the story are easy.

Commercial and advertising photographer Charles Orrico was commissioned about two years ago by an ad agency to photograph at the abandoned Kings Park Psychiatric Center in Kings Park, New York, on behalf of a holding company that planned to develop the site. Building 93, the main structure in the complex, was of special...

Filed under
Art Rosch Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

The earth rotates tilted on its axis approximately 23Þ. This fact renders most forms of astrophotography maddeningly complex. There is one form of night sky photography that is given to us in relative simplicity by our home planet's relentless spin: star trails. All we need to create gorgeous star trail shots is a camera, a tripod, and a remote or cable release.
...

Scott Stulberg Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Being a photography instructor is very rewarding and has proved to be an inspiration to me. Teaching Digital Photography at UCLA Extension in Los Angeles, I have found the interaction with students benefited me at least as much as them. But what if someone wants to take your class and is halfway around the world? That is where online teaching comes in and I am lucky enough to have...

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading