Pro Techniques

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Feb 01, 2009 1 comments

The photographs of Philip Perkis come from his own inner world; they are quiet images that speak to us intimately. Presented in a recent show at the Alan Klotz Gallery in New York, many of them grace the pages of his new book The Sadness of Men, published by The Quantuck Lane Press.

Currently a teacher at Pratt Institute and the School of Visual Arts...

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Jay Abend Posted: Jan 01, 1998 0 comments

One of the claims often heard when talking about medium format cameras is, "With this camera you can get practically 4x5 quality." How realistic is that claim anyway? Let's face it, a 4x5 sheet of film has over three times the total real...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

When Canadian engineer Joseph Cacic designed and built a tripod in the late 1990s that would accommodate bird’s eye aerial images, Boston photographer Frank Siteman was among his first customers. For Siteman it was the perfect solution for the environmental photographs that he favors. Weighing 75 lbs and easy to roll, the tripod can be placed in a garden without disturbing any of the floras...

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Rick Sammon Posted: Jun 01, 2000 0 comments

Ever wonder what ingredients professional travel photographers use to make great on-location pictures? Here's my gourmet recipe.

Getting Ready To "Cook."...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

Sooner or later, you're going to be tempted to buy a product that's labeled "refurbished." It will probably be the lower price that attracts you--after all, there is one and only one reason to even consider "refurb" and that is to save money. Depending on where you shop, you may be led to believe that the refurbished item is as good as...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 21, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 1 comments
Who: Robert Beck, staff photographer for Sports Illustrated.
What: Infrared (IR) photography.
When: “The editors give me some leeway,” Robert says, “but I’m not going to be using it for a decisive putt.”
Where: Golf courses all over the world.
Why: Although the job calls for capture of the peak moment, the turning point, the key play, the tense concentration, the moment when the athlete’s body language gives it all away, there’s always the professional and personal challenge to do something different.
How: With a Nikon D700 modified for infrared photography.
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Phillip Andrews Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

For the last 30 years, Greg Gorman has spent his working life capturing great portrait images. To many, the very essence of his work centers around and draws strength from the celebration of fame, fortune, and position. It is true that his most recognizable images are the faces of the famous, but dig a little deeper and you will find that his imagery goes beyond the mere...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2011 0 comments

Every digital image starts out as a color image, an RGB that, when shot in Raw format and loaded as a 16-bit file, contains millions of color and brightness codes. These codes, or pixel addresses, can be manipulated in many ways using presets or “manual” adjustments to create looks that range from “true” to highly stylistic interpretations of the content within the image.

Jeff Howe Posted: Jul 02, 2013 Published: May 01, 2013 1 comments
Several years ago I decided to take on a challenge of focusing on macro photography right in my own backyard. No, I do not reside in the Sierra mountains or adjacent to a national wildlife refuge or conservation area. I live in a typical South Florida suburban subdivision surrounded by homes and asphalt. South Florida doesn’t even offer much in the way of seasons. Yet, I am amazed at how many unique images I have captured over the past several years.
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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 1999 0 comments

Computer viruses are small, invasive programs written by malevolent and misanthropic misfits that are designed to create havoc within your computer system. You get computer viruses in the same way that you catch the human variety; through contact with...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Aug 01, 2010 0 comments

The first time I met Sam Gray was probably about 1975. I was a young photographer attending one of my first Maine state conferences and Gray was one of the program speakers. I can still remember how elegant and beautiful his images were. I also remember how he struck me as a quintessential southern gentleman. He was soft spoken yet exuded confidence. You couldn’t help but admire the...

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Jay McCabe Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Sandro, All Rights Reserved

"A lot of people, that camera is in front of them and there's a fear, an anxiety that rises inside them. You need them to look past the camera and connect with you."

"You've got to have a game plan," Sandro says, and there's no pun intended. He's talking about photographing...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

“Understanding the genres, history, and style of the music is a huge part of my success,” John Scarpati observes. “I work very closely with the bands and artists to make sure the cover art reflects what they want to say.” Scarpati (www.scarpati.com), as he prefers to be called (“when someone yells Scarpati on set...

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George Schaub Posted: May 28, 2014 1 comments
Human visual perception is a wondrous thing—it allows us to see a wide spectrum of colors, with all the subtleties and shades, lights and darks, pastels and richness of the earth and the heavens. To see in black and white is an abstraction of that world, one that perceives luminance, or brightness, without the benefit of hue. Yet hue, or color, and its shades, often determine what tones, or grayscale values, will be seen in black and white. If one were always to see the world only in black and white it would be considered a deficiency of vision. But to see that way occasionally, and to be able to render what we see in a monochrome fashion, opens the door to different perceptions and feelings about the world, and yields a unique form of expression in the bargain.
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Rosalind Smith Posted: Apr 01, 2007 0 comments

As a newspaper photographer, you never know when you show up in the morning what you're going to be working on--sometimes it's an environmental portrait, other times a feature, or a documentary image that is posed," San Francisco-based Peter DaSilva says.

"Whatever it is, I need to produce a picture of quality every time I'm sent...

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