Pro Techniques

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Steve Bedell Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

The first time I saw some of Thom Rouse's work, I was stunned. It was so artistically and technically excellent I had to stop and study it for a while, just like you do when visiting a gallery. That's why I had to share it with you. Rouse is a portrait and wedding photographer who regards digital photography as not just an advancement of conventional photography but as...

Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Apr 04, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments
Vincent van Gogh once said, “Stars are the souls of dead poets, but to become a star you have to die.” Vivian Maier (1926 - 2009) was an amateur photographer who had no desire to share her work with anyone during her life, and kept a treasure trove of over 100,000 prints, negatives, and films in five storage lockers in Chicago. By several twists of fate, they ended up in the hands of a few collectors who recognized their unique quality, and are now shown in books, documentaries, museums, and galleries throughout the world.
Lorin R. Robinson Posted: Apr 11, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments
It is probably true that a photographer, through almost single-minded devotion to a place, can help make it known, understood, and appreciated. But the converse is also true. A place can make a photographer. Its beauty, its landscape, its human dimensions, its impact on the creative spirit can mold or shape a photographer—both as artist and person. That’s been the experience of fine art photographer William Davis in his 45-year symbiotic relationship with Northern New Mexico and the small town of Taos.
Jim Corbran Posted: Apr 07, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments
The idea for Phil Pantano’s photographic series, “The American Worker,” walked into his office at a local steel mill in Lackawanna, New York, where Pantano holds a day job as a computer analyst. The man who came through the door was Jay “Elvis” Borzillieri, a fourth-generation steelworker whose father died in the mill. It doesn’t matter to the story what Elvis stopped in for that day, but when Pantano looked into his face a flash went off in his mind.
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Rick Sammon Posted: Nov 01, 2002 0 comments

I recently returned from a 10-day trip to China. I was at the Great Wall, Tieneman Square, the Forbidden City, and Yellow Mountain. I stopped in remote villages and traveled by boat along winding canals. I took hundreds of photographs...and...

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Jay Abend Posted: May 01, 2000 0 comments

The Simple Life

I love fancy photography equipment as much as the next guy, but there are times when I like to put away all of the expensive cameras, lighting gear, and softboxes and try and shoot with some basic gear.

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Maria Piscopo Posted: Jun 20, 2014 Published: May 01, 2014 0 comments
What is “stock” photography, and how can it be a source of revenue? First, let’s define some terms. In most cases, rather than selling an image in the stock photo market think “license,” as stock images are not really sold—they are licensed for a particular use. The larger agencies all license Rights Managed (RM) images and many Royalty Free (RF) agencies will offer a “removal from market” option if an exclusive license is needed by the client.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 01, 1999 0 comments

For years we've been asking professional photographers a variation of the same question: what does it take to be a pro? We may ask, "What's the secret of your success?" (as if it were a secret); or, simply, "What is it that...

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Tony Sweet Posted: Jun 01, 2001 0 comments

Capturing mood
imagery in photography is achieved through applied techniques and filters.
Of course, subject selection, exposure, and compelling composition are
the most important elements in creating evocative imagery. When thel...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jan 01, 2001 0 comments

It's an old antique store--okay, you can call it a junk shop--by the side of the road in Delaware, and photographer Tony Sweet drives by a lot on his way to the coast from his home in Baltimore. And it's a great place to take pictures simply because it...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

"Silver white winters that melt into springs."--Oscar Hammerstein II

The idea behind this story was to provide insight into the photo gear I own and use, all of which was purchased from Shutterbug advertisers. During the review process many different photographic products pass through my hands but contrary to what you may think they don't stay there...

David FitzSimmons Posted: Aug 01, 2009 0 comments

This emotional rush that comes with first seeing a waterfall—and then the incurable urge to find as many vantage points as possible around it—compelled me to begin documenting these secluded, sibilant landscapes. You see, I have always loved waterfalls. When I was younger, my parents loaded the three boys in the family station wagon, “the boat,” as we called it, pointed...

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Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Jun 20, 2014 Published: May 01, 2014 0 comments
Known as a master of combining art in the traditional sense with photography, Chiarenza has been making pictures for five decades. He started out with tightly framed, documentary-style photographs that sparked a lifelong interest in abstract images and landscapes. But since 1979 he has been making collages out of scraps of paper, foil, can lids, and whatever else he finds or people send him. He then photographed the collages with Polaroid positive/negative film, always in black and white. Using light, shapes, forms, and surfaces, the results are very unique images that encourage the viewer to let his or her imagination do all the interpretation.
Maria Piscopo Posted: Mar 21, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments
As technology changes so do methods of presentation. In this article I set out to discover what type of portfolio photographers have found work best and, from the buyer’s perspective, what type or types they prefer. As I conducted the interviews among art directors, photo reps, and photographers it all began to boil down to this: how do you get your work seen by potential clients and how do you craft an effective portfolio that makes sense to them and represents your craft and passion?
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

I recently had the opportunity to photograph poison dart frogs, and I was excited to do so because these unique creatures have brilliant colors and are endlessly fascinating. While they make for amazing pictures, they also present significant technical challenges. I had to do some thoughtful planning before I attempted to shoot them. I started out by buying several tropical plants...

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