Pro Techniques

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Lou Jacobs Jr. Posted: Dec 01, 2010 0 comments

Photo Arts group members live in the Palm Springs, Redlands, and Joshua Tree areas of California, and we are very informal with no officers or rules at monthly meetings. We exchange critiques and chat about photography in many of its myriad forms. We also eat well.

Some members are experts in Photoshop and related programs, some are infrared fans, a few favor black and white, and...

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Jay McCabe Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

I’ve shamelessly borrowed the title of E.B. White’s classic 1949 essay, and I’ve done it because my first views of Lindsay Silverman’s High Dynamic Range (HDR) photos of New York made me think of White, wandering the city, constantly re-examining its continuing spectacle in the hope that he could put it on paper.

Lindsay’s...

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Ted Kawalerski Posted: Feb 01, 2010 0 comments

When I began this project—what has since evolved into something much more than I originally imagined—it was a hobby.

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Theresa Airey Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

I started out my photographic career in 1980 and studied with some of the most prominent photographers of our time. I learned to previsualize my images and was rewarded with perfectly "zoned" black and white negatives. However, I was never satisfied with my black and white prints. I always wanted more and felt something was missing. I began translating the negative...

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Brian Kosof Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

As someone who prefers a minimal style, I want to control, beyond the usual photographic variables, the level of detail and the sense of depth in an image. For this I have embraced the use of diffusion while enlarging. The use of diffusion during film exposure to soften a scene, or when used in a portrait to reduce skin texture and flaws, is long established. Nature can be just as...

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Joseph Meehan Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

I have always been fascinated by how differently other photographers portray the same subjects that I photograph. Indeed, my office shelves are crammed with books and magazines with such images. Many of these pictures have influenced how I think about the visual world and how various photographic tools can be used. I am particularly attracted to pictures that convey something...

John Siskin Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

I probably take more pictures of people working than any other subject. Since I am a commercial photographer this makes a lot of sense. I love taking shots of people actually working; they provide wonderful opportunities to see people involved in something they take seriously. You can often get shots where people really aren’t paying attention to you, just doing what they do. Work shots...

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John Neubauer Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

The scenery rolls by quickly, too quickly really, to take in the fullness of any one moment. One scene quickly becomes part of the one just rushing by, which too quickly becomes part of another. Vast stretches of farmland push against distant mountain ranges, workers labor freshly plowed and watered fields, burros pull plows, squat villages flash by, then in quick succession...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

The fact that Lizz Rosenbaum invariably carries a camera is not surprising. She was raised in a family where photography hit the trifecta: business, pleasure, and passion.

But what's with the mirror?

Well, the mirror makes it possible for Lizz's photography to be entirely self-sufficient. With a setting or...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

Two-time American poet laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Stanley Kunitz collaborated with noted Boston photographer Marnie Crawford Samuelson to translate a man's life and his garden into a profound and touching union.

"Something was obsessing me to want to photograph Stanley Kunitz in that garden on Cape Cod," Crawford Samuelson says, "a chance...

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Joseph A. Dickerson Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

It's a well-known tenet that Perspective Control (PC) or tilt/shift lenses are intended for shooting architectural subjects. But who says you have to use them that way?

A PC lens lets you do a certain amount of tilt/shift, rise/fall control, a limited equivalent to a technique that view camera photographers can fully exploit via the...

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Sep 01, 2010 0 comments

The Yale University Art Gallery and Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library announced the joint acquisition of the Lee Friedlander Archive and 2000 of the photographer’s master prints. With this acquisition, the Yale University Art Gallery becomes the largest holder of Friedlander’s work by any museum, and the Beinecke Library becomes home to the preliminary work and...

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Lou Jacobs Jr. Posted: May 24, 2013 Published: Apr 01, 2013 1 comments
In the annals of American photography the images made by Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographers in the 1930s and 1940s are famous. Over a dozen men and women captured a variety of life and work styles during the Great Depression. Their pictures, distributed to news media and other outlets, illustrate how people were dealing with the hard times of the Great Depression, and were used to justify programs for relief and aid.
Maria Piscopo Posted: Sep 10, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 0 comments
Does using social media as a marketing tool work for photographers? That’s what we aimed to find out by interviewing five photographers who have successfully used this particular marketing technique in very specific ways. Unlike advertising and direct mail, where you send out your material and wait for a response, and sales calls, which are more time-consuming, social media is a unique technique that can breed success, but only when properly and fully utilized. Many thanks to our photographers for taking the time and attention to share their thoughts and experiences (websites at end of column): Liz Cowie, Clark Dever, David Alan Kogut, Brad Mangin, and Chuck St. John.
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Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Apr 01, 2007 1 comments

Capturing the beauty of artwork with a camera has always been a challenge. Sure, it's easy to take a picture of a picture, but to reproduce the full range of colors, textures, and tones that will carry the power of the original, that is a challenge. There is a growing demand for high-quality digital files for juried shows, portfolios, and even for limited edition inkjet...

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