Pro Techniques

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Jon Canfield Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

Canvas prints are becoming extremely popular these days and there are a tremendous number of options available to you, both traditionally mounted with a frame and with a gallery wrap, where the image wraps around the side of the mount and no frame is used. Good options for online printing include Canvas On Demand (www.canvasondemand.com)...

Brad Perks Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Rainbows have inspired legends of luck and good fortune. The beautiful colors are created in a simple process. Capturing a rainbow with your camera takes a bit of that good luck.

Rainbows require two simple ingredients--sunlight and raindrops. They combine at just the right angle to colonize a beautiful picture. The colors are formed when...

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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Jul 01, 2010 0 comments

No matter how light you pack, you always feel like you could add just one more item. Knowing photographers, if you can take it, you will. If you plan your trip correctly, you will save weight and not only make your outing a success, but be more mobile and comfortable as well.

With that in mind, let’s look at some “ounce saving” tips. Your...

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Howard Millard Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Want to add a new dimension to your photography? Try shooting panoramic pictures--shoot a series of two or more frames and then combine them digitally. The wide sweep of the panoramic format captures attention, adds impact, and compels viewers to...

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Efrain M. Padro Posted: May 01, 2009 0 comments

Comprised of almost 390,000 square miles (slightly bigger than France and Germany put together), Patagonia is located in the southernmost third of both Argentina and Chile. Here the Andes Mountains plunge into the Pacific Ocean, leaving a trail of glaciated valleys, rugged granite peaks, ancient glaciers, jade green lakes, and endless plains. This stark and surreal landscape is also rich in...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 28, 2013 Published: Apr 01, 2013 2 comments
A phone call from a friend woke Chris Fulcher at his home in Newtown, Connecticut, around 10:30am on December 14th last year. “I’d slept late and didn’t know what was going on,” Chris says. “My buddy told me to check the news, and then I rushed to the school because my 6-year-old cousin goes to that school.”
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 23, 2012 Published: Apr 01, 2012 26 comments
In 1987, my friends Julie and Jim bought the 12-room, three-story Victorian in which they’ve raised their daughters, Megan and Emily. Early on they researched the house and the Connecticut mill town in which it’s located. They found maps that indicated the house had been built between 1870 and 1875; town records revealed much of the chronology of ownership. Over the years they renovated the kitchen and one of the bathrooms, stripped layers of paint from woodwork and doors, replaced wallpaper and made restorations and repairs. They came to realize that the original floor plan of the house was pretty much intact, though there seemed to be some changes they couldn’t quite figure out. And Julie, Jim, Megan, and Emily—they like to figure things out. Often they thought, if only there were photographs of the old house.
Eric Dusenbery Posted: Mar 23, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 1 comments
“Our family came to America from Vietnam in the 1960s. When I first came to America, I came with fear. I was unsure of what I was going to find, my family had to be broken up. I had no clue if they had made it to America safely.”—Khanh Duong (Excerpt from Liana Bui’s student photo/oral history project.)
Mike Butler Posted: Oct 12, 2011 Published: Sep 01, 2011 26 comments
Shooting architecture has always been a complex matter and while the challenges remain the digital medium has helped overcome many hurdles. Challenges such as color balance, lighting consistency, and the need to hide every single light and cord have been lessened. In this article I will describe one challenge that exemplifies how I now use digital to make images that would have been logistical nightmares in the past.
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John Isaac Posted: Mar 13, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 2 comments
“Earlier this year, I was invited by JIB TV in Tokyo and Olympus, Japan to help document the recovery taking place after the terrible earthquake and tsunami that hit the northeast part of the country in March 2011. I agreed to do it even though I knew it would be a traumatic experience.
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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Jul 20, 2011 Published: Jun 01, 2011 1 comments
Brute horsepower, large diesel engines pulling thousands of tons of freight, heavy plumes of exhaust pouring from their stacks, sand being put down on the rails for traction, and the rumble of steel wheels passing by—all are part of the American railroad scene. For both the novice and advanced photographer, the challenge of capturing the drama of moving trains and finding suitable locations is all part of the excitement.
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Jackie Weisberg Posted: Mar 12, 2013 Published: Feb 01, 2013 1 comments
I live near the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn and have been photographing the canal and the neighborhood for over two decades, but it was only in the fall of 2009 that my photographs had the prospect of becoming a historical record, due to the imminent prospect of development and a long-term cleanup. Either way, the area was going to change dramatically. The photographs I produced have won awards, been featured in exhibitions, and 17 of the images have been acquired by the Brooklyn Historical Society for their permanent collection.
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Lou Jacobs Jr. Posted: Jan 24, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 1 comments
After almost 40 years of making platinum prints, chemical fumes had harmed Tom Millea’s lungs to a point where he could no longer go into the darkroom. He says, “Closing my studio was traumatic in the extreme.” He didn’t believe that anyone else was capable of printing his work as he envisioned it. He liked computers but had no desire to try to make digital prints look like his platinum prints. “One technique could not replace the other,” he says. He selected prints from his inventory to sell in gallery shows and considered himself retired.

But by 2004, when the color palette of digital inks had changed, Millea thought his prints were beautiful, and comparable with his darkroom images. He began making digital color photographs full-time using an Epson 2200 printer. Over the next five years, he says, “By myself, step by step, I learned to use the computer to make images I felt were uniquely my own.” He eventually put together a complete digital studio with Apple computers and two Epson printers, the 4800 and the 9800. He could then make his own prints up to 40x60”.

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Jim Mitchell Posted: May 01, 2007 0 comments

I don't know if I have found my photographic "vision" yet, but I have definitely found my obsession. For me, it began five years ago when I bought my first sophisticated 35mm SLR film camera. Before then my photographic experience had been limited to the typical point-and-shoot family snapshots, but with this new camera something "clicked" (other than...

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Lou Jacobs Jr. Posted: Dec 01, 2010 0 comments

Photo Arts group members live in the Palm Springs, Redlands, and Joshua Tree areas of California, and we are very informal with no officers or rules at monthly meetings. We exchange critiques and chat about photography in many of its myriad forms. We also eat well.

Some members are experts in Photoshop and related programs, some are infrared fans, a few favor black and white, and...

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