Pro Techniques
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Pro Techniques
Jack Neubart May 01, 2008 0 comments

In a career spanning 40 years, Jeff Smith's work as an industrial and corporate photographer is well-known to many. Not too long ago we'd find him going to a job site with literally almost a half-ton of lighting gear, along with a Mamiya RZ67 and heavy lenses, not to mention countless packs of film and Polaroids. Over the years the market has shifted, technology has...

Pro Techniques
Jay McCabe Sep 01, 2005 0 comments

It starts with the website, which is a key element in wedding photographer John Solano's business. John's goal is to be pre-sold before the client even meets him. "The ideal is that I don't have to show them a picture," John says. "I do that, of course, but the work kind of sells itself, and if they've seen it already, the selling is...

Pro Techniques
Lou Jacobs Jr. Apr 01, 2011 1 comments

When the Virginia Tourism Corporation needed a series of illustrations, to help publicize tourism with imaginative style, photographer Keith Lanpher, based in Norfolk, was chosen for the job. This was a location project that called for seven days of shooting with numerous models as well as a passel of dogs and a large smoke machine.

Lanpher knew it would...

Pro Techniques
Joe Farace Jan 01, 1998 0 comments

Big. Everything about digital imaging with medium format film boils down to the joys and delights of working with large image files. A frame of medium format film dwarfs a 35mm negative or slide and while this bigness produces more image quality, it also...

Pro Techniques
Rosalind Smith Oct 01, 2000 0 comments

Imagine this.
You are preparing prints for a highly respected exhibition. It is now
in the fifth consecutive day of rain. You process the prints in your usual
way--everything seems to be going well throughout the entire chemical...

Pro Techniques
Steve Bedell Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

Being a photographer for 30 years has helped me to become more acutely aware of my surroundings. I find myself at all times watching how light pours over faces, how compositions just jump out at me, and how micro landscapes abound everywhere in daily life. So, it was with great surprise one day that I noticed just how blissfully unaware I was of my surroundings, and that maybe my...

Pro Techniques
Jim Zuckerman Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

One of the things that makes a photograph successful is that attention is directed to the subject. This can be done with good lighting, muted backgrounds, or graphic design. An important design element that directs our attention into the heart of a picture is called a leading line. This is a line that usually begins at the bottom of the composition and extends into the heart of the scene...

Pro Techniques
Jason Schneider Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), the world-renowned center of imaging tech, research, and photographic education, and Leica Camera, acclaimed for its legendary cameras and outstanding optics, proclaimed May 6, 2008 as Leica Day. The daylong event, hosted by RIT at its impressively large modern campus, was celebrated with speeches, lectures, tours, slide shows, seminars...

Lighting, Pro Techniques
Barry Tanenbaum Jul 25, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 27 comments
The intriguing thing about lightpainting is you never know exactly what you’re going to get. And whatever you get, you won’t get it again. That’s part of the technique’s appeal: you’re creating a one-of-a-kind photograph.

Simply, a lightpainting photo is an image made with a handheld, constant light source in a dark room or environment. The camera’s sensor captures only what you choose to illuminate. Lightpainting images can range from relatively simple to fairly complicated. Striking photos can be created indoors with nothing more than a still life subject, a tabletop to put it on, and a small LED penlight to light it. Or you can think big: how about a mega-powerful spotlight illuminating prairie land in the Grand Tetons or a mesa in Monument Valley?

Pro Techniques
Lorraine A. DarConte Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

A. T. (Tom) Willett and Jeff Smith are commercial photographers whose clients include Humana (insurance), Getty Assignments, Tucson Guide, More Magazine, the Arizona Public Service (APS), and the University of Arizona. The duo met more than 20 years ago while attending Pima Community College in Tucson.

Both moved to the small city when they were young (Willett from...

Pro Techniques
Kim Wilson Nov 12, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 3 comments
Lise Gagné is a stock photographer from Quebec City, Canada. An exclusive contributor with istockphoto.com since her first photo submission in 2003, she is a superstar on the popular microstock website.

Lise’s story is one of passion, persistence, ingenuity, and timing. As a graphic designer she often used photography in her work. One day, when searching for an image she needed for a project, she came across istockphoto.com and was immediately attracted to the idea of creating images for the then emerging market of RF (Royalty Free) images.

Pro Techniques
Ron Eggers Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

One reason that many photographers prefer working in a studio is because they can totally control all aspects of light, from its source to its power, temperature, and direction. To control light in a studio, photographers utilize a variety of light modifiers, including umbrellas, softboxes, light tables, and barn doors.

Shooting in the field...

Stan Trzoniec Jan 28, 2014 Published: Dec 01, 2013 0 comments
When photographing animals on an African safari, sharp photos are a gift to bring home and it all centers on proper technique. Use the “sweet spot” on the lens; with both of my shorter lenses it was around f/5.6 or f/8. On the longer zoom, I found f/5 or f/5.6 gave me needle-sharp and distortion-free images. With the animal at rest, always put that focusing spot on the eye. On longer distances or perhaps with the animal moving, place that spot on the shoulder or flank to keep a decent depth of field throughout their length.
Rich Sheremeta Dec 19, 2012 Published: Nov 01, 2012 2 comments
Montana’s rich mining history dates back well over 100 years. In the year 1852, gold was first discovered southeast of Drummond, along Gold Creek, at a site that later became known as the Pioneer Mining District. But it wasn’t until a decade later, in 1862, that a group of prospectors from Colorado discovered gold along Grasshopper Creek, at what was to become the Bannack Town Site, which fueled the Montana gold rush.
Pro Techniques
Efrain M. Padro Feb 07, 2013 Published: Jan 01, 2013 2 comments
Growing up in San Juan, Puerto Rico, I used to love playing in the Spanish colonial castles in Old San Juan, imagining I was a Spanish conquistador getting ready to do battle with foreign attackers. My interest in castles and history has never subsided, although the only shooting I imagine anymore involves my camera, not guns. I was therefore excited when I had the opportunity to visit and photograph a number of castles in Northumberland, a region located in England’s northeastern corner abutting the North Sea. Besides its numerous castles, Northumberland also features wide beaches and tall sand dunes, rugged cliffs, rolling hills, and quaint fishing villages.