Pro Techniques

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Steve Bedell Posted: May 01, 2010 17 comments

First off, a brief description of what Facebook is, just in case you’re one of the few people on the planet who is not already a member. Facebook (www.facebook.com) is defined as a social-networking site. It was originally designed by founder Mark Zuckerberg while he was at Harvard University as a way for Harvard students to communicate...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Oct 01, 2000 0 comments

As the last days of summer give way to frosty nights and crisp mornings, the world is transformed into a fiery splendor. In most parts of the US and Canada, crimson maples, golden poplars or aspen, and red dogwoods dominate the landscape. This is a...

Daryl Hawk Posted: Feb 07, 2013 Published: Jan 01, 2013 1 comments
After 30 years of making a living as a professional photographer I reached another milestone this past July—I traveled with my 17-year-old son Justin around the entire state of Oregon, our goal being to create an in-depth documentary of this beautiful state. We had never before traveled together solely as a photo team. This trip served as another milestone for me—it would be my first photo trip with my new Canon digital camera, having finally said goodbye to my beloved manual Nikon SLRs and Fujichrome slide film.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jul 21, 2014 0 comments
The beautiful designs and colors that can be found in the feathers of many species of birds offer wonderful photo opportunities. You can create frame-filling shots of unique patterns, and it’s also possible to make interesting arrangements of the feathers that become a unique art form unto itself.
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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

If you maintain all your own images you have more freedom in how to go about tagging these photos for future reference.

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

To help make this as easy as possible, it’s helpful to follow a few guidelines for organizing your images.

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

Although some outdoor photographers prefer to shoot everything by available light, electronic flash can be surprisingly useful. In the past, it was difficult to produce a natural looking effect with flash in outdoor photography without a bit of expertise. All too often the results appeared to be artificial, with a harsh effect caused by flash becoming the primary light source.

Joe Farace Posted: Dec 24, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments
Leaves haven’t started falling on Daisy Hill, but soon will be, and just as quickly the number of leaves needing to be raked reminds me of the thousands, maybe tens of thousands, of websites I’ve looked at and written about for Web Profiles over the years. The best are presented here but there are almost as many—maybe more—near misses that fail to make the grade because they lack focus. Not the pictures, mind you, but the purpose of having a site in the first place. While it may seem obvious to you it may not be to the person who lands on your homepage. Fall is a good time to reappraise and perhaps redesign your site for the New Year, giving it not just a new look but also a new purpose. Set a goal for your site and make sure that everything from the colors used to the words and images that appear go toward achieving that goal.
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Maynard Switzer Posted: Mar 01, 2011 1 comments

I’m writing this in mid-December as I’m making plans for a February trip to Vietnam. As those plans are shaping up, it might be a good time to talk about how I decide what to take on my photo trips and how I try to ease it all through the world’s airports.

The gear I take depends on where I’m going, how long I’ll be there, and what I expect to accomplish. One thing I know from the...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jul 21, 2014 0 comments
I’m sure that everyone who has ever owned a camera has taken pictures of flowers. It’s impossible not to. Flowers are too beautiful to resist, and there are so many species and varieties that you could devote your entire life to shooting nothing but flowers and hardly scratch the surface.
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Josh Miller Posted: May 21, 2012 40 comments
Since the development of photography in the early 1800s, there has always been a strong tradition of photographers using their work to promote conservation and social justice issues. One need only to look at the development of the National Park System in the United States to see the impact early photographers had on conservation. William Henry Jackson, with his 1871 Yellowstone photographs, helped push through legislation that established Yellowstone as the world’s first National Park. Another well-known example of a conservationist photographer was Ansel Adams, whose tireless efforts both as a photographer and as a 37-year member of the Sierra Club’s Board of Directors led to the establishment of Kings Canyon National Park in 1940.
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Ralph J. Adkins Posted: Apr 01, 2007 0 comments

My life in photography changed one fall morning at the Frederick County Fair. A numbness on my right side indicated that I was joining the more than 600,000 people nationwide who suffer from strokes each year.

Thankfully, others around me recognized the first signs of my stroke and rushed me to a nearby hospital. During my 25-day hospital stay, I had ample time to...

Steve Bedell Posted: Apr 01, 1999 0 comments

Ah, Palm Beach. Just the mention of the name brings images of wealth and power to mind. Exotic cars, palatial estates, beautiful people, exclusive stores, and there's so much more--crystal skies, blue-green waters, the Intercoastal Waterway, yachts...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 3 comments

“You need to establish a connection with the food in front of the camera,” observes New York-based food photographer Francesco Tonelli (www.francescotonelli.com). “I can do a better job photographing a dish when I can picture myself eating it. That’s the frame of mind I need to be in so that I can capture the...

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