Pro Techniques

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Jay Abend Posted: Nov 01, 2002 0 comments



Surreal Composites
--A great technique is to take a collection of original images and combine them to create a fanciful and surreal final image. For this other-worldly desert scene I took four original film shots of...

Maria Piscopo Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

In my workshops I often get asked, "How do you find digital clients?" I think there is a myth surrounding the word "digital." Photography clients are not really "digital" as a category to target in your marketing. Clients are hiring you to create images and, if it is commercial work, buying the use of those images. If it is consumer, wedding...

Maria Piscopo Posted: Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

As photo businesses go, David Alan Wolters (www.DavidAlanWolters.com) started out as many of our readers--a 12-year-old kid with a camera trying to find a place for himself in the world. Again, like many of us, Wolters went on to work on the high school yearbook as a photographer. Raised in the small town of Spring...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 01, 2010 0 comments

For all practical purposes, you can narrow your film scanning options down to four choices. There are three types of scanners: drum, flat-bed, and dedicated film scanner. The fourth alternative is to have your film scanned by a professional lab.

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Dec 01, 2009 0 comments

The guy at the camera store told you that a filter is “cheap insurance against fingerprints and expensive repairs” but was he really looking out for your best interests?

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: May 01, 2010 0 comments

Many of the cameras used by Shutterbug readers use SD memory cards. SD stands for Secure Digital, and it’s the most popular type of media for digital imaging. SD has been around for so long that people use this identifier generically, and refer to all variations simply as “SD.” This practice can lead to problems. There are a couple of new kids on the block, and you should know...

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Dave Howard Posted: Jan 01, 2001 0 comments

The concept of carrying a small camera with you at all times certainly isn't new. Street photographers from the first half of the last century, whose main work was most often done with a cumbersome tripod and large format camera...

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George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2009 1 comments

For the past three summer seasons Canon has sponsored their Photography in the Parks Photo Contest, highlighting images made by photographers in our nation’s national parks.

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Maynard Switzer Posted: May 07, 2012 Published: Mar 01, 2012 2 comments
What I want to capture in my photography can be expressed as the character of a place. I have to aim for images beyond “this is what it looks like here” because in my business photos have to tell stories, have to illuminate, even educate; my images should always reveal something of the culture, the history, and, most important, the lives of the people.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Sep 30, 2014 0 comments
One of my favorite details to photograph is ice. It is as artistic and intriguing as anything you’ll encounter, and I never tire of the beautiful patterns and shapes I find. From ice crystals on a window (#1), to the impressive formations of glacial ice, such as (#2 and #3), the abstracts in ice that nature generates has been a life-long fascination for me.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

My biggest surprise in shooting the famous Carnival of Venice was how accommodating the costumed people were to be photographed. I had assumed that they would become quickly annoyed with all the photographers stopping them and wanting pictures, but the opposite was true. They came out just to be photographed. Some were out as early as 7am and in the sunrise lighting they posed in front of the...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 15, 2006 Published: Dec 01, 2006 5 comments

Changing lenses on a digital SLR subjects the interior to invasion by dust and other airborne particles. While we can avoid the problem with prudent handling, eventually we'll have to face the facts: dust will get on the sensor. The imaging sensor, whether CCD or CMOS, is a dust magnet. As soon as the camera is turned on the sensor becomes electrostatically charged. Any...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Dec 06, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments
Chances are you won’t be photographing in the negative numbers of extreme cold that Layne Kennedy often encounters—we’re talking -15 to -30 degrees Fahrenheit—but his experience with and guidelines for cold-weather shooting can provide you with a considerable degree of comfort no matter what the temperature.
Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

Consistently achieving accurate color may be digital photography's most difficult skill to master. Shooting the same subject under different lighting conditions can cause unacceptable color variations which can be difficult and time consuming to correct later. Digital cameras have many more color balance options than film ever did, but when the ambient lighting changes from...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 19, 2014 0 comments
In this article we’ll be exploring various in-camera creative options. Today’s cameras contain microprocessors that are like having a custom photo lab and graphic art studio built-in. In the color realm they allow you to choose color saturation (vividness), neutralize or enhance color casts (white balance) and even create custom color renditions to match every subject and scene. Drive modes allow you to capture fast action “in a hurry” and pick out the best frame, aiding you in getting the best sports shots you ever made.

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