Mirrorless Camera Reviews

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Edited by George Schaub  |  Mar 07, 2014  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2014  |  0 comments

The Olympus E-P5 has a classic viewfinder camera design but doesn’t have an optical or electronic viewfinder. It does have a swivel monitor which can be folded up- and downward and offers very high resolution (1,037,000 RGB dots). Its 3:2 aspect ratio shows additional information on both sides of the viewfinder image, which has an aspect ratio of 4:3 when taking images in the highest image resolution setting. By pressing the “OK” button in the center of the control field additional parameters are shown as overlays on the right-hand side of the live view image.

George Schaub  |  May 03, 2012  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2012  |  0 comments

The compact Olympus E-PL3 has a retro body design and is available in different colors. The camera has a large swivel LCD on the back which allows the user to flip the monitor up and down. This is handy but is not as flexible as a swivel monitor that allows side-to-side movement. The LCD screen is a standard TFT screen instead of the OLED system used by the Olympus E-P3.

Dan Havlik  |  Feb 04, 2015  |  0 comments

Olympus unveiled its latest, high-end mirrorless camera this morning: the tough, small and powerful OM-D E-M5 Mark II. The E-M5 II uses a Micro Four Thirds sensor similar to the one in the previous model – it once again offers 16 megapixels of resolution – but Olympus says the Live-MOS chip has been redesigned.

Josh Miller  |  May 09, 2017  |  0 comments

I recently had the chance to take the new Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II along with my regular full-frame Nikon system to Alaska and the Yukon on an outdoor shoot. Rather than test charts and pixel peeping, I focused on the real-world usability of Olympus’ new flagship mirrorless camera and its ability to get the job done as compared with a large and heavy DSLR system. 

Edited by George Schaub  |  Apr 21, 2014  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2014  |  1 comments

The new Olympus OM-D E-M1 is the follower of the first OM-D, the proper and full name having been the “OM-D E-M5.” The E-M1 incorporates many of the E-M5 advantages, the famous five-axis image stabilizer being one of them. This image stabilizer is based on sensor-shift technology and allows the user to shoot a stabilized image with every lens system mounted to the camera.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Oct 13, 2015  |  0 comments

The OM-D E-M10 Mark II (E-M10 II in the following text) is the second generation of the Olympus entry level E-M system line. The first E-M10, introduced in January 2014, was a very small and compact camera with SLR design elements. The E-M10 II has a very similar look with even more “retro style” elements. The on/off switch, for example, looks like the same switch on the analog Olympus OM-1 from the 1970s.

George Schaub  |  Mar 15, 2018  |  0 comments

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III is the latest iteration of a long and storied lineage that began in the early 1970s with the introduction of the then-revolutionary OM-1 35mm SLR film camera. As is with the new digital Mark III, the analogue OM-1 was a lightweight and portable camera that posed a viable alternative to the comparatively bulky SLRs of the day.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jan 30, 2015  |  0 comments

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 is the newest and smallest in the company’s mirrorless, Micro Four Thirds-based OM-D camera system. This Compact System Camera (CSC) has a classic SLR design, comparable to other OM-D cameras like the E-M1 and the E-M5. The E-M10 is quite small, almost like a high-end compact camera. The small body could make operating the camera a bit uncomfortable for photographers with large hands, although the body is very robust and based on a magnesium alloy chassis.

Joe Farace  |  Jan 23, 2019  |  0 comments

Olympus just launched the 20.4MP OM-D E-M1X, the company’s latest pro-level mirrorless camera. Shutterbug got some early hands-on testing time with the camera and this is our review.

Dan Havlik  |  Jul 07, 2015  |  0 comments

If you’re looking for a small and portable yet powerful camera that’s a good alternative to heftier digital SLR models, Olympus’ OM-D line of mirrorless compact system cameras are some of the best options out there. These retro-styled shooters recall cameras from the film era, resembling miniaturized SLRs. In short, if you feel all warm and fuzzy at the sight of classic cameras, you just might find Olympus’ OM-D models to be absolutely adorable. But there’s more to them than simple nostalgia.<

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jan 17, 2013  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2012  |  0 comments

The Olympus OM-D is a retro-style camera that harkens back to the OM System of the 1970s and 1980s. In the current Olympus lineup, this Micro Four Thirds system camera sits somewhere between the PEN cameras and the E-System cameras. Like the PEN, it offers a very compact design and many helpful features for beginners, yet the design is oriented toward a classic SLR.

Joe Farace  |  Feb 14, 2012  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2012  |  2 comments

The half-frame 35mm Olympus Pen F was introduced in 1963 and featured none other than the late W. Eugene Smith, cigarette dangling from his lips, in magazine ads of the time. Its latest digital incarnation, the E-P3, is built using the Micro Four Thirds system that unlike the Pen F is not half-frame and uses the same chip size (17.3x13mm) as the standard Four Thirds system. Like the original Pen F, it’s an extremely sophisticated camera wrapped in a compact, interchangeable lens body that delivers SLR performance and lots more. The E-P3 is the flagship of the Olympus Micro Four Thirds system and part of a family of compact cameras that includes the E-PL3, E-PM1 a.k.a. Mini, new lenses, and a clever little wireless speedlight.

George Schaub  |  Jul 15, 2011  |  0 comments

With the recent announcement of the third PEN in this series from Olympus, which is now in Shutterbug test, the not yet discontinued E-PL2 has dropped in price to $599 (from Olympus, with 14-42mm kit lens), about $200 less than when it was first introduced and to me a good deal for what you get while you can get it. The 12MP (effective pixels) Live CMOS sensor Olympus E-PL2 adds to the charms of the first in the “PEN” digital series, the P1. (See Joe Farace’s excellent review of that camera at http://www.shutterbug.com/content/olympus-e-p1in our Jan, 2010 issue) The PL2 adds a larger and higher resolution viewing screen, expanded accessories using the special plug-in adapter, an enhanced control setup and expanded Scene and Art filter modes.

 

Edited by George Schaub  |  Nov 11, 2016  |  0 comments

The new Olympus E-PL8 is the latest model of the PEN series. PEN cameras are stylish and compact systems based on Micro Four/Thirds sensors and lens mounts. The camera is available in different colors, as are the numerous accessories that can be matched to the initial color choice. The camera looks like an analog rangefinder camera, but the Olympus E-PL8 doesn’t come with a viewfinder. The photographer has to use the 3-inch LCD on the back, which also serves as the visual control center for menus and image parameters. Olympus does offers an EVF system that can be mounted on the hot shoe of the E-PL8.

Jack Neubart  |  Feb 01, 2016  |  0 comments

Without telling us why, Olympus ferried a number of the photo press to Austin, Texas last week, myself included. As it turned out, the purpose was to debut the new Olympus Pen-F Micro Four Thirds digital mirrorless camera ($1199.99, body only). We got to test out the new Olympus Pen-F for several days in Austin, and all I can say is, Wow! 

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