Mirrorless Camera Reviews

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Edited by George Schaub  |  Nov 12, 2013  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2013  |  1 comments

The Canon M is Canon’s first mirrorless system camera. It uses an APS-C-sized sensor (slightly smaller than APS-C, just like all Canon “APS-C” cameras) with 18MP resolution. The camera doesn’t offer an optical or electronic viewfinder; the photographer has to use the large (3”) LCD screen on the back that offers a remarkably high resolution of 1,040,000 RGB dots. While it offers a very crisp and clear image, an additional viewfinder, for shooting under bright light conditions, would have been welcome. The monitor is “fixed” and does not offer swiveling, or articulation. It is, however, a “touchscreen” type, which is fully integrated into the operational concept of the camera.

George Schaub  |  Mar 12, 2014  |  1 comments

The hybridization of cameras and phones has produced various manifestations of late, one being the Samsung Galaxy S4 Zoom, reviewed here a few months back, which looks like a smartphone with a camera/lens grafted onto it’s front. The Galaxy NX comes at this combination from the other direction, a decidedly camera-like design with built-in Android functionality, sans phone capability, but with all the other amenities and accouterments included. And there’s no confusing this with a smartphone, what with it being 3x5.5x2.25 inches in size, the benefit being a very large back display, 4.77” on the diagonal and width to height ratio of 2.5 x 4 inches.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Oct 06, 2016  |  1 comments

The monochrome mode on most digital cameras is a convenience that is best avoided. Conventional wisdom says that it’s far, far better to shoot Raw and convert to monochrome—or at least to start with a color JPEG. But Fujifilm suggests that their ACROS film simulation mode might even top the best Raw converters. Does it? 

Dan Havlik  |  Dec 31, 2014  |  1 comments

Ahead of our upcoming full review of the new 28-megapixel Samsung NX1 mirrorless camera, which will appear in the March 2015 issue of Shutterbug, we had a chance to shoot some sample test images with the camera at the annual Christmas Spectacular show at Radio City Music Hall in New York City.

Jack Neubart  |  Apr 01, 2015  |  0 comments

If you’re going to test a new camera, I can think of few places better suited than the Big Island of Hawaii. And that’s precisely what I, and a number of my colleagues in the photo press, had a chance to do recently with the new 28-megapixel Samsung NX500 camera. We put Samsung’s newest mirrorless compact system camera (CSC) through its paces in diverse settings on the island, each designed to challenge the NX500 and ourselves.

George Schaub  |  Jul 14, 2017  |  0 comments

While it might seem unusual that a camera can be both mirrorless and have a medium format size sensor, that’s exactly what Fujifilm has created with their new GFX 50S. The 51.4MP CMOS sensor size is 43.8x32.9mm, 1.7x the size of the sensor in a full-frame DSLR; the body is decidedly mirrorless, lacking a pentaprism finder and replacing it with an EVF and a tiltable rear LCD. 

Edited by George Schaub  |  Sep 02, 2014  |  0 comments

The Fujifilm X-A1 is the “little sister” of the X-M1. Both cameras have nearly the same design and technical features but use different sensor technology. The X-M1 uses Fujifilm’s X-Trans CMOS sensor while the X-A1 is equipped with a 16MP sensor with the Bayer RGB pattern, although it should be mentioned it is APS-C size. The different sensors are the main reason for the lower price of the X-A1, making it one of the least expensive X-type cameras with a detachable lens system.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Apr 24, 2015  |  0 comments

The Fujifilm X-A2 mirrorless compact system camera, the successor to the X-A1, uses a standard APS-C sized image sensor rather than the X-Trans CMOS II sensor found in other Fujifilm cameras like the X-T1 and X-E1. Nevertheless, the new Fuji X-A2 gets the most out of this sensor technology and showed a very good performance in our tests.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Feb 24, 2017  |  0 comments

The retro-styled Fujifilm X-A3 is the latest in the company’s X-A Series mirrorless cameras. The Fuji X-A3 is a more affordable option for those interested in a mirrorless interchangeable lens system camera that also includes some features found in the company’s premium product lines.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Aug 20, 2013  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2013  |  0 comments

The X-E1 is the second mirrorless system camera made by Fujifilm. In contrast to the X-Pro1, it has an electronic viewfinder with ultrahigh resolution (2.3 million RGB dots) instead of the X-Pro1’s hybrid viewfinder (combination of optical viewfinder and electronic viewfinder).

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jul 15, 2014  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2014  |  0 comments

The Fujifilm X-E2 is a compact system camera with a “retro” design that offers 16MP resolution. Compared to its forerunner, the X-E1, changes include an electronic viewfinder with extremely high resolution. The small OLED display of the X-E2 has 2.36 million RGB dots and shows a brilliant, very crisp reproduction of the viewfinder image, images in review mode, and menus. The combination of the high-resolution monitor, the electronic magnifier (“viewfinder loupe”), and the focus peaking function are very helpful when working in manual focus mode.

George Schaub  |  Apr 24, 2018  |  0 comments

I was heartened to see the new Fujifilm X-E3 being promoted by the company as being “built from the essence of minimalism.” In art and design, minimalism is paring down to bare essentials, a kind of “less is more and more is less” approach. In a modern digital camera it should mean a design and layout that might well appeal to those who, in ye olde film days, chose a manual interchangeable lens rangefinder over a multifunctional SLR.

George Schaub  |  May 30, 2018  |  0 comments

Aimed at advanced and enthusiast photographers, the Fujifilm X-H1 ($1899, body only) has a 24MP APS-C  sensor with 5-axis (5.5EV) image stabilization. We take a closer look at this mirrorless camera in this review.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Apr 18, 2014  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2014  |  2 comments

The Fujifilm X-M1 is an extremely compact system camera that uses Fujifilm’s 16MP X-Trans CMOS sensor. The camera offers very high image quality due to its special RGB filter array which differs from the standard Bayer RGB pattern. The pattern on the APS-C-sized X-Trans sensor resembles the random pattern of grain of analog film and reduces image noise. The interpretation of this RGB pattern isn’t very easy, but the most current versions of Adobe’s Photoshop Camera Raw plug-in and Adobe’s Lightroom are able to convert this pattern correctly.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Oct 09, 2012  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2012  |  0 comments

The new Fujifilm X-Pro1 has a stylish, retro design with many interesting features. It is Fujifilm’s first compact system camera with Fujifilm’s new lens mount system. Fujifilm currently offers three lenses for the “X mount”: the XF18mm f/2 R, the XF35mm f/1.4 R, and the XF60mm f/2.4 R Macro. We used the 35mm lens for all our test images and the 60mm lens for the portrait test shot.

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