Mirrorless Camera Reviews

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Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Aug 31, 2017  |  1 comments

The Leica TL2 is a mirrorless camera with an APS-C size 24-megapixel CMOS sensor, 3.7-inch touchscreen LCD, 49-point contrast-detect autofocus system and 32GB of onboard storage. Features include advanced, integrated Wi-Fi (with potent smartphone app), UHD 4K and Full HD video, and a variety of other attractions.

Jason Schneider  |  Apr 01, 2007  |  0 comments

The moment you take the eagerly anticipated Leica M8 in your hands you know that the design engineers at Leica have gone to great lengths to preserve the look and feel of perhaps the greatest 35mm rangefinder camera of all time, the legendary M-series Leica that debuted in 1954 as the original M3 and continues as the classic retro MP and autoexposure M7. The M8 retains the classic...

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Nov 06, 2019  |  0 comments

Leica just announced the SL2, a 47.3-megapixel mirrorless full-frame system camera, which is the successor model to the esteemed Leica SL (reviewed here), and Shutterbug was invited to take a preproduction model for an early spin. Let’s take a look at the Leica SL2's long list of new features before we recap some of our thoughts and impressions about this new Leica model in this first look review.

Edited by George Schaub  |  May 13, 2014  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2014  |  0 comments

The Nikon 1 AW1 is the first digital compact system camera that can be used for diving or other active sports without an additional protective case. Protected by a stainless steel front cover, all function elements, card slots, and interfaces are protected by sealed covers. While the 1 AW1 can be used with all lenses of the Nikon 1 system, using it underwater and in similar adverse conditions requires the use of special lenses. Nikon offers a standard kit lens with a focal length of 11-27.5mm (29.7-74.25mm, 35mm film equivalent) that is protected by sealing gaskets and therefore can be used underwater. The second underwater lens is the 1 Nikkor AW 10mm f/2.8.

George Schaub  |  Apr 09, 2012  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2012  |  0 comments

The diminutive Nikon 1 series of cameras, including the J1 reviewed here and the coming V1, introduces the new CX-format CMOS sensor to the interchangeable lens, mirrorless camera field, which we dub Compact System Cameras. The sensor is smaller than APS-C and Micro Four Thirds sensors, coming in at a 2.7x multiplication factor using standard 35mm focal length designations. The 10.1-megapixel sensor has a native speed of ISO 100, with speeds up to 3200, and 6400 with a 1 EV push.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Nov 22, 2013  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2013  |  0 comments

The Nikon 1 J1 was Nikon’s first Compact System Camera (CSC), introduced in 2011/2012. The new J3 has a new image sensor with higher resolution (14MP instead of 10MP) and some additional features. It is still a very compact camera and just about the smallest CSC system now available.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jun 05, 2015  |  0 comments

The Nikon J5 is the newest in Nikon's 1 series mirrorless camera line and is the first in the series to offer 20MP resolution. (Note: the first Nikon 1 cameras had 10MP, while the most recent, the V3, had 18MP resolution). Compared to APS-C sensors with about 23.5 x 15.6 mm and Micro-Four-Third cameras with 17 x 13 mm, the J5 has a smaller sensor at 13.2 x 8.8 mm, Nikon’s CX format. The crop factor is nearly 1:2.7 which means that the “effective” (defined as the 35mm format equivalent) focal length of the kit lens (1 Nikkor 10-30mm f/3.5-5.6 VR) is about 27-81 mm. The camera has a very slim and compact design, which allows for easy transport and usage, similar to a compact camera.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Mar 15, 2013  |  0 comments

The S1 is the brand new entry-level camera in Nikon’s 1 series. With a sensor resolution of 10 MP it offers the same nominal resolution as the first Nikon 1 cameras, the 1 J1 and 1 V1, which were launched in 2011.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jul 09, 2012  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2012  |  0 comments

The Nikon V1 camera is designed and sized like a compact camera. It offers a new lens mount system for the new Nikon 1 lenses and offers two viewfinder systems—an EVF (electronic viewfinder) with very high resolution (1.44 million RGB dots), which delivers a very brilliant and crisp image. Alternatively, users can work via a large and bright LCD on the back, which also offers high resolution (921,000 RGB dots). The sensor will switch automatically between viewfinder systems when the photographer looks through the ocular. This differs from the camera’s sibling, the J1, which offers LCD viewing only.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jul 19, 2013  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2013  |  0 comments

Compared to the first generation of Nikon’s compact system cameras, the V1, the design of the V2 has changed radically. Instead of a small body with minimized dimensions, it has attained extra girth, although we feel it has also acquired better handling agility as well.

Shutterbug Staff  |  May 30, 2018  |  0 comments

If you’re considering buying a high-resolution full-frame camera, you’ve likely considered both the Nikon D850 DSLR or the Sony A7R III mirrorless camera.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Aug 06, 2018  |  0 comments

Here it is, folks: the ultimate full frame camera shootout many photographers have been waiting for. Tony & Chelsea Northrup put the 45MP Nikon D850 DSLR against the 42MP Sony A7R III mirrorless camera in the below comparison video.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 06, 2018  |  0 comments

When Nikon announced the first two models in their new Z Series of full-frame mirrorless cameras, they provided an intriguing choice for both advanced amateurs and pros. The Nikon Z7 features a 45.7MP sensor for those photographers who desire maximum resolution, while the new Z6 is a more nimble, 25.4MP model that Nikon describes as the perfect “all-rounder.”

Dan Havlik  |  Feb 27, 2019  |  0 comments

The Nikon Z7 is, perhaps, the most well-designed full frame mirrorless camera on the market right now. It took me a little while to realize this.

George Schaub  |  Oct 18, 2011  |  0 comments

The Olympus E-P3 is the follower of the E-P2 and E-P1, the first Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras that were offered as “retro style cameras”. The E-P3 offers the same image sensor as the E-P2, with a nominal resolution of 12MP, but the E-P3 uses a newly developed image processor unit called “TruePic VI” plus offers some enhancements in the AF-speed. The automatic focusing system is really fast and showed a very good performance during our tests. In addition it has some special modes like “AF tracking mode”, which will help both photographers and videographers.

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