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George Schaub Posted: May 24, 2005 0 comments

While the usual photographic rules, such as using shutter speed to portray motion
(slow to blur, fast to freeze) and using focal length, aperture and camera-to-subject
distance to create a certain depth of field apply to both film and digital photography,
digital offers some intriguing options for making camera settings. In some cases
these settings relate to film photography settings, or choosing a specific film
for its "personality", but with digital you can alter these settings
on every frame you shoot and not be restricted to the attributes of a particular
film you might have loaded in the camera.

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 23, 2009 1 comments

The Fujifilm Finepix 200 EXR (list: $599; street, under $500) sports a 12 megapixel sensor and a 14.3X optical zoom lens that is equivalent to 30.5-436mm (!) It takes stills and high-quality video and has a built in mic that delivers quality sound without much if any whirring from the camera. Having that much zoom capability means that you never will want on the tele side with this integral lens camera, and even 30mm is not bad on the wide side.

Looking like a small D-SLR with a moderate zoom lens, the S200EXR actually sports a 30.5-436mm optical zoom, an incredible range in a lens this small, though smaller sensor size is part of the reason they could attain the smaller size.

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 29, 2006 0 comments

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All Photos
© 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 26, 2007 0 comments

The III also sports a new Raw option, dubbed sRAW, which is 2.5 megapixels
in size and half the file size of "regular" Raw images. The advantage,
claims Canon, is that sRAW images can be processed just like any Raw image but
stored in at a smaller size. This is perfect, they say, for wedding candid photographers
who want Raw post-exposurepr...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

There are times when we have images that are too dark or too light and often
reject them out of hand. But the values only need to be adjusted to bring what
might have sat in shadow into the light. We can do that selectively with certain
tonal areas in the print or globally--that is, on the entire image. This
web how-to covers revealing what might sit in the shadows and deals with a very
simple global adjustment. The work is done here in Photoshop, but many other
image manipulation programs have similar controls.

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 09, 2004 0 comments

While you can choose enhanced color saturation when using your digital camera
via the Menu, this choice generally adds saturation to all colors at once. This
might work fine for some subjects, but there are many ways to "juice up"
selective colors later in the software. We'll work with two controls here,
Hue/Saturation and Selective Color, both used as Adjustment Layers.


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George Schaub Posted: Mar 26, 2008 0 comments

If you ever want a unique point of view try a "fisheye" lens. Like
looking through a door peephole (which in fact is a "fisheye" type)
this order of lens sacrifices linear correction in favor of a very wide angle
of view. Originally made for creating "full sky" images when pointed
straight up, they had long ago been adopted by photographers for creation of
decidedly different points of view, and, today, even doing QuickTime movies
to display the interior of a condo or vacation home.


Sigma 4.5mm f/2.8 EX DC HSM (Motor-in) Lenses

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 25, 2006 0 comments

Digital Image Sensor Update



The Promise of Even Better Image Quality Ahead



by George Schaub

All the talk in the past was about megapixels, with the horserace of ever-higher
counts grabbing all the headlines. Some folks claim that the latest 6 and 8
MP cameras deliver such good quality at such low price points that themegapixe...

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George Schaub Posted: May 29, 2007 0 comments

All Photos © 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

It'ssimple...

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