George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: May 30, 2006 0 comments

In Brief

WD Passport Portable USB Drives

by George Schaub

It's clear that having a backup strategy when on the road can often make
the difference in image insurance. While downloading to your laptop to clear
your memory cards is now standard operating procedure, you should also consider
burni...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 27, 2007 0 comments

The Case for Center Weighted Metering

by George Schaub

While today's multi-pattern metering system found in most DSLRs are marvels
of technology, you'll notice that almost every DSLR also has other metering
pattern options. The two main options, with variants available on some cameras,
are center-weightedaver...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 05, 2005 0 comments

Willard (Bill) Clark, a photo industry icon and the former executive director
of Photoimaging Manufacturers & Distributors Association (PMDA), died on Sept.
24. He was 77 years old. Cause of death was cancer.



Mr. Clark was associated with the photo industry for more than 40 years primarily
in consumer and trade journalism, both as a writer and photographer, and more
recently with PMDA. He worked with the senior executives of virtually every firm
in the photo industry, serving as confidant and advisor to many and earning the
respect of all.



Mr. Clark came to New York as a photographer for United Press after working for
a small Ohio newspaper as a reporter and photographer. His equipment in those
days was a 4x5 Speed Graphic, standard issue for a news journalist at that time
but now seen only in photo museums and period movies. In 1954 he became associate
editor of U.S. Camera magazine and then founding editor of Camera 35 magazine.
"I was a staff of one," he once said. He subsequently was appointed
editor.



After a variety of other magazine publishing positions, Mr. Clark came back to
the photo industry in 1981 as editor and associate publisher of Photo Weekly Magazine,
which evolved into Photo Business Magazine. His final publishing stint was a short
one as editor of PTN.



Mr. Clark retired from his position as PMDA executive director earlier this year.



At the time of his retirement, some industry associates paid tribute to him. Stacie
Errera, chief marketing officer for Tamron USA, Inc., and current president of
PMDA, said, "Bill always acted as a professional and was liked by everyone.
Everything Bill did was in the best interest of the organization."



Dan Unger, Agfa's director of marketing and PMDA board member, said of Bill:
"He was an easy-going guy who did everything right."



Mr. Clark is succeeded by two sons, Paul, Ashland, OR, and Bruce, Hopewell, NJ,
both attorneys, and two granddaughters, Fiona, 3 ½ and Emmeline, 1. He
was pre-deceased by his wife, Olga.



Editor's Note: The notes on Bill's life were kindly
provided by Jerry Lansky. I knew Bill for almost twenty years and he was always
a class act, with a kind word and encouragement for all. His "How are you
doin', man!" greeting will always echo in my ears. Those fortunate
enough to have known and worked with him understand that he was a great contributor
to photography and the photo industry and a genuinely good soul. I will miss him
greatly.

--George Schaub ...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

It's 10PM: Do You Know Where Your Pixels Are?

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 26, 2006 0 comments

One look at the specs of this new Tamron zoom and you'll understand why
it's immediately attractive to anyone carrying around a digital SLR in
their day bag. Weighing in at around 15 oz and measuring just under 3x3.2",
the lens is quite the marvel of size for what it delivers in focal length and
aperture options. Indeed, if someone told me that a constant aperture, 17mm
wide lens would be this size a few years back I'd have thought they had
lost their optical marbles. To be fair, however, that 17mm is not really a 17mm
in 35mm equivalent, thus practical terms, and I wonder why lenses like this
are still labeled that way. This lens is only for APS-C sensors, which means
it has the "35mm equivalent" of a 27mm wide angle view and 80mm
tele.


Tamron's new 17-50mm zoom, available in Canon, Nikon, Konica
Minolta (read Sony), and Pentax (read Samsung) mounts is highly
portable and compact.

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 25, 2006 0 comments


Open an image in Photoshop, then evoke the dialog box at Filters>Alien...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 26, 2006 0 comments


All Photos © 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 15, 2005 0 comments

Handcolorists have been doing it for years. They began with a black and white
image and using photo oils, chiefly from the Marshall Company (distributed by
BKA Group) added selective color or entirely covered a monochrome image with
color. This was often practiced with portraits, but began to find followers
in the "fine arts" arena as well. We've seen this so-called
mixed-media trend come and go, and I don't think hand-coloring will ever
go out of style. Digital has opened up many new doors for creativity, and because
you can manipulate images with ease it allows you to emulate any look, style
or technique that you might admire. In this lesson we'll take a look at
"colorizing" an image and mixing color with black and white.

...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 26, 2005 0 comments

There's lots to like about the new Olympus C-7000 camera, including the
size of the image files it puts out and the "seamless" 30X zoom
(5X optical and 6X digital combined) that delivers better quality digital zooms
than many cameras we've worked with in the past. The C-7000 is aimed at
those who like to get involved with their photography, and offers as many options
and modes as you could desire. They certainly make this a camera that allows
you to flex your creative muscles. Granted, you have to delve into the menu
to get at most of the options, something that helps streamline the body but
can hold up spontaneous changes.


Olympus C7000 camera from file (PMA)

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 15, 2005 0 comments

The pixels that make up a digital image each have an "address",
a code that defines color, brightness and shades. When we make images with a
digital camera or from film with a scanner we are creating a matrix of pixels
that altogether create the illusion of a continuous tone image. These codes
are not dyes or even densities, but specific information as to how the computer
will interpret the colors and tonal values on the screen. It is only when we
make a print that we leave the "digital" world and enter the world
of dyes and pigments. Because each pixel has a code, basically a bunch of information
that is composed of bits and bytes, we can alter that code to change the "address",
or color and tonal look of every pixel. In this lesson we'll use the Replace
Color dialog box, found in most versions of Photoshop, or under other names
in other programs, to illustrate the point and give you an easy, fun way to
play with your pictures.

...

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