George Schaub
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News
George Schaub Nov 29, 2005 0 comments

Today's cameras are microprocessors with lenses. Most of us know how
to change color, sharpness and contrast, and even ISO settings, for every frame
we shoot, but did you know that you can also change how your camera's
dials and buttons work? By using Custom Function settings you can alter the
function of all those dials and buttons and personalize them to the way you
work, or to each unique shooting situation. When the camera comes out of the
box it has certain "default" settings, those chosen by the camera
manufacturer. While there is a certain wisdom in the defaults, they are not
necessarily the best way for your style or shooting needs.

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News
George Schaub Sep 28, 2004 0 comments

Lexar Media, Inc. has introduced two new Professional CompactFlash Readers
designed to address professional photographers' need for almost instantaneous
data transfer and an improved project workflow. Built with material similar
to a digital camera, with a unique industrial design of hardened plastic and
rubber over mold, the new card readers can be easily stacked and daisy-chained
together for concurrent download of images. In addition, the new card readers
support Lexar's ActiveMemory System for improved photography workflow.


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Newsletter
George Schaub Jun 21, 2005 0 comments

Now I know how stagecoach drivers felt when they saw those first rail lines
being laid over their routes. The recent announcement that Kodak would be discontinuing
their silver black and white papers didn't come as much as a shock as
an inevitability that one always hopes will not be manifest. With inventories
expected to last a few months, we're now witnessing the disappearance
of venerable brands such as Polycontrast IV, Azo and Polymax Fine Art, Kodabrome
II and Portra, even their "Digital Black and White" paper, which
was used for digital printers. According to a Kodak spokesperson, Kodak has
seen a cumulative drop in black and white paper buying of 25% per year over
the past few years and could no longer justify being in the market. We also
learned, by the way, that Kodak black and white papers had of late been produced
in Brazil, being packaged from rolls in Rochester. The spokesperson did stress,
however, that Kodak black and white film and chemistry was not on the chopping
block and that Kodak sees silver photography as still extremely viable.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

There are times when we have images that are too dark or too light and often
reject them out of hand. But the values only need to be adjusted to bring what
might have sat in shadow into the light. We can do that selectively with certain
tonal areas in the print or globally--that is, on the entire image. This
web how-to covers revealing what might sit in the shadows and deals with a very
simple global adjustment. The work is done here in Photoshop, but many other
image manipulation programs have similar controls.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Feb 15, 2005 0 comments

Handcolorists have been doing it for years. They began with a black and white
image and using photo oils, chiefly from the Marshall Company (distributed by
BKA Group) added selective color or entirely covered a monochrome image with
color. This was often practiced with portraits, but began to find followers
in the "fine arts" arena as well. We've seen this so-called
mixed-media trend come and go, and I don't think hand-coloring will ever
go out of style. Digital has opened up many new doors for creativity, and because
you can manipulate images with ease it allows you to emulate any look, style
or technique that you might admire. In this lesson we'll take a look at
"colorizing" an image and mixing color with black and white.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Jul 26, 2005 0 comments

If you have Photoshop Elements or the full version of Photoshop
you can also use a tool called "Save for Web" to resize your images.
(Note that other programs might also have this feature under a different name.)
This is an automated way to get your images the right size for sharing. To get
to this toolbox just go to File>Save for Web, with the image already open
on your desktop.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Jun 07, 2005 0 comments

The digital darkroom has made it simple to accomplish print and image effects
that would have taken hours in the chemical darkroom environment. While the
learning curve can be steep (as it certainly was for the chemical darkroom,
at least if you wanted good results) the ease with which some tasks can be accomplished
is almost...well, embarrassing, at least to those who once labored in the
amber-lit confines of the darkroom.

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News
George Schaub Oct 05, 2005 0 comments

Willard (Bill) Clark, a photo industry icon and the former executive director
of Photoimaging Manufacturers & Distributors Association (PMDA), died on Sept.
24. He was 77 years old. Cause of death was cancer.



Mr. Clark was associated with the photo industry for more than 40 years primarily
in consumer and trade journalism, both as a writer and photographer, and more
recently with PMDA. He worked with the senior executives of virtually every firm
in the photo industry, serving as confidant and advisor to many and earning the
respect of all.



Mr. Clark came to New York as a photographer for United Press after working for
a small Ohio newspaper as a reporter and photographer. His equipment in those
days was a 4x5 Speed Graphic, standard issue for a news journalist at that time
but now seen only in photo museums and period movies. In 1954 he became associate
editor of U.S. Camera magazine and then founding editor of Camera 35 magazine.
"I was a staff of one," he once said. He subsequently was appointed
editor.



After a variety of other magazine publishing positions, Mr. Clark came back to
the photo industry in 1981 as editor and associate publisher of Photo Weekly Magazine,
which evolved into Photo Business Magazine. His final publishing stint was a short
one as editor of PTN.



Mr. Clark retired from his position as PMDA executive director earlier this year.



At the time of his retirement, some industry associates paid tribute to him. Stacie
Errera, chief marketing officer for Tamron USA, Inc., and current president of
PMDA, said, "Bill always acted as a professional and was liked by everyone.
Everything Bill did was in the best interest of the organization."



Dan Unger, Agfa's director of marketing and PMDA board member, said of Bill:
"He was an easy-going guy who did everything right."



Mr. Clark is succeeded by two sons, Paul, Ashland, OR, and Bruce, Hopewell, NJ,
both attorneys, and two granddaughters, Fiona, 3 ½ and Emmeline, 1. He
was pre-deceased by his wife, Olga.



Editor's Note: The notes on Bill's life were kindly
provided by Jerry Lansky. I knew Bill for almost twenty years and he was always
a class act, with a kind word and encouragement for all. His "How are you
doin', man!" greeting will always echo in my ears. Those fortunate
enough to have known and worked with him understand that he was a great contributor
to photography and the photo industry and a genuinely good soul. I will miss him
greatly.

--George Schaub ...

Newsletter
George Schaub Nov 22, 2004 0 comments



Remember the shoebox, the place where all those snapshots were stored? It was
a great tradition to take a roll of film, share it with family and friends and
then dutifully deposit the pictures and negatives into a cardboard container that
would be stocked away on some closet shelf. Well, digital photography hasn't
changed that great tradition, but nowadays the "shoebox" is more likely
filled with CDs or DVDs that hold the pictures--only to be stacked away in that
same closet next to that snapshot shoebox.

News
George Schaub Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

If you've ever been walking down the street and a picture caught your
eye, but had no camera to capture the moment, then the small, shirt-pocket size
digicams might just be item you're seeking. A number of companies, including
Pentax, Casio and Minolta have already introduced such models, each with their
own unique feature sets. Now, Contax, a name renowned for exquisite cameras
and excellent lenses, has jumped into the fray with their own version, the U4R,
a 4-megapixel camera sporting a Carl Zeiss Vario-Tessar T* lens. Those familiar
with the amazing image clarity of this line of lenses will immediately recognize
the name; those unfamiliar with it can be assured that it is a legendary name
in optics. The camera has just under a 3x optical zoom lens, delivering the
equivalent of 38-115mm in 35mm format. There's also a digital zoom if
you need it, delivering over 400mm, but as with many digital zooms it's
really a crop into the frame, and will not deliver the quality of the prime
optics.

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