George Schaub
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News
George Schaub Oct 04, 2004 0 comments

SanDisk
Corporation has introduced the world's fastest flash memory cards --
the SanDisk Extreme III line of CompactFlash, SD and Memory Stick PRO digital
film cards. The CompactFlash and SD cards have minimum write and read speeds
of 20 megabytes per second (MB/sec.).Memory Stick PRO has minimum write and
read speeds of 18 MB/sec. The SanDisk Extreme III cards, which range in capacity
between one and four gigabytes (GB), have essentially double the performance
speeds of SanDisk's predecessor Extreme product line which currently has
the fastest working cards in many of today's leading digital single lens
reflex (SLR) cameras.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Nov 09, 2004 0 comments

While you can choose enhanced color saturation when using your digital camera
via the Menu, this choice generally adds saturation to all colors at once. This
might work fine for some subjects, but there are many ways to "juice up"
selective colors later in the software. We'll work with two controls here,
Hue/Saturation and Selective Color, both used as Adjustment Layers.


1

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News
George Schaub Apr 26, 2005 0 comments

There's lots to like about the new Olympus C-7000 camera, including the
size of the image files it puts out and the "seamless" 30X zoom
(5X optical and 6X digital combined) that delivers better quality digital zooms
than many cameras we've worked with in the past. The C-7000 is aimed at
those who like to get involved with their photography, and offers as many options
and modes as you could desire. They certainly make this a camera that allows
you to flex your creative muscles. Granted, you have to delve into the menu
to get at most of the options, something that helps streamline the body but
can hold up spontaneous changes.


Olympus C7000 camera from file (PMA)

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Newsletter
George Schaub May 10, 2005 0 comments

Backlight has been bedeviling photographers for years, particularly in landscape
pictures and those where you want to take a shot but simply showed up at your
location at the wrong time of day. Backlight in and of itself is not the problem;
it's how your meter behaves and how you make the reading that creates
it. Simply put, when the subject falls within its own shadow because the brightest
illumination is behind it the meter can be overwhelmed by the illumination and
"fooled" into thinking it has more light for the exposure than the
main subject dictates.

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Newsletter
George Schaub May 24, 2005 0 comments

While the usual photographic rules, such as using shutter speed to portray motion
(slow to blur, fast to freeze) and using focal length, aperture and camera-to-subject
distance to create a certain depth of field apply to both film and digital photography,
digital offers some intriguing options for making camera settings. In some cases
these settings relate to film photography settings, or choosing a specific film
for its "personality", but with digital you can alter these settings
on every frame you shoot and not be restricted to the attributes of a particular
film you might have loaded in the camera.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

It's 10PM: Do You Know Where Your Pixels Are?

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News
George Schaub Oct 01, 2004 0 comments

Extensis Inc. has announced an update
to its Pro Photo Raw Image Filter for Portfolio 7. The updated filter will be
a free upgrade for registered owners of Extensis' digital asset management (DAM)
solution for organizing digital photos, illustrations, page layouts and presentations.



With the Pro Photo Raw Image Filter, Portfolio generates high-quality thumbnails
and previews from the unprocessed raw image files created by professional digital
cameras from Nikon, Olympus, Kodak, Canon, Fuji, Konica-Minolta, Pentax and Imacon.
With the Pro Photo Raw Image Filter, Portfolio 7 can extract EXIF metadata and
IPTC from the Raw files, create thumbnails for displaying the images in catalogs,
and generate high-resolution JPEG previews on the fly for detailed viewing, printing,
slideshows and QuickTime movies.



The Pro Photo Raw Image filter for Portfolio is powered by technology from Bibble
Labs.



The following cameras and file formats are supported by the updated Pro Photo
Raw Image Filter for Portfolio 7:



Nikon - D1/D1x/D1h/D100, D70/D2h

Fuji S2 Pro/S7000Z

Olympus- E10/E20/E1/C5050/C5060

Kodak - DCS 14n/DCS 760C/DCS 760M/720X/ Pro Back/Pro Back Plus/Pro Back 645 for
Contax, Mamiva and Hasselblad H1/DCS SLR/n/DCS SLR/c



Canon - EOS D30/ EOS D60/ EOS 10D/ EOS 1D/ EOS 1Ds/ EOS 1D Mark II/ EOS Digital
Rebel/300D/Kiss/ Powershot G5/ Powershot G3/Powershot G2/ Powershot G1/ Powershot
S50/ Powershot S45/ Powershot S40/ Powershot S30/ Powershot Pro90 IS



Konica-Minolta - A1/A2

Pentax - *ist D

Imacon - (extracts 680X680 preview and metadata only. Extensis recommends the
newest version of Flexcolor for proper metadata support) Flexframe 3020/Flexframe
4040/All iXpress Backs/ All Flextight Scanners using FFF format.



Support for additional cameras will be added in the future.



Pricing and Availability


The Pro Photo Raw Image Filter for Portfolio will be available by later in 2004
via download from the Extensis website and is free of charge for registered Portfolio
7 users. Portfolio 7 is available for a suggested retail price of $199.95US for
full product.



Contact: www.extensis.com
or call 1-800-796-9798.

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News
George Schaub Oct 28, 2004 0 comments

Westcott has recently made a new addition to its line of Soft Box Light Modifiers
by introducing the New Masters Brush. The New Masters allows users to create more
defined shadowing, which enhances depth and adds contour.



Westcott worked directly on the design with Master Photographer Ken Cook, a third
generation family studio owner with over 50 years of experience. The specially
designed multi layer front panel along with the Barn Door and internal baffle
creates a 2 f-Stop differential between the center or the heart of the light and
the outer edges. This allows users to achieve the lighting patterns created by
the old Masters of Photography using split, broad and short lighting, including
all the variations of Rembrandt and Butterfly Lighting.
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Newsletter
George Schaub Mar 15, 2005 0 comments

The pixels that make up a digital image each have an "address",
a code that defines color, brightness and shades. When we make images with a
digital camera or from film with a scanner we are creating a matrix of pixels
that altogether create the illusion of a continuous tone image. These codes
are not dyes or even densities, but specific information as to how the computer
will interpret the colors and tonal values on the screen. It is only when we
make a print that we leave the "digital" world and enter the world
of dyes and pigments. Because each pixel has a code, basically a bunch of information
that is composed of bits and bytes, we can alter that code to change the "address",
or color and tonal look of every pixel. In this lesson we'll use the Replace
Color dialog box, found in most versions of Photoshop, or under other names
in other programs, to illustrate the point and give you an easy, fun way to
play with your pictures.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Apr 12, 2005 0 comments

For those who have been working with the latest digital cameras--both
integral and interchangeable lens types--you've probably seen an
option called Raw among your file formats. Unlike JPEG and TIFF, Raw is not
an acronym and therefore we don't capitalize it, and is just what it states--the
"raw" image date received by the sensor and digitized within the
microprocessor of the camera. It is not "raw" in the sense that
it is unfettered or unrecognizable, but it does take image processing software
other than what's in the plain version of some image processing programs
to see it. That Raw software converts the Raw image file format to an image
on the screen and allows you to save it to a format other than Raw--such
as TIFF or JPEG.

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