George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 26, 2007 0 comments

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Courtesy of Sigma Corporation, All Rights Reserved

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 27, 2005 0 comments

The
Sprint PCS Samsung Multimedia Phone MM-A800



Much ado has been made of late of how camera phones will gut the lower-end digicam
market and how everyone will dump their 1-3MP digicams for these amazing multimedia
products. Having shot with a sub 1-megapixel phone a year back I shrugged and
moved on, deciding it was a fun toy that some might find useful but that image
quality was poor, even when compared with the lowliest of blister-pack dedicated
cameras. Word has gotten around that new, higher-megapixel phonecams are coming,
with 7 MP being the figure touted on one model available now overseas. In addition,
we just got word that Kodak is finally going to release their EasyShare One,
subject of a press conference last January, which is said to be a camera first
and then a web or phone connecting pictuire sender second. With all that in
mind I was intrigued by the new Samsung 2MP camphone sent to us by the folks
at Sprint, one that links up with Sprint's PCS Picture mail service.

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2006 0 comments

The Panasonic DMC-L1 DSLR is Panasonic's first digital single lens reflex
camera. Priced at just under $2000 with a Leica D Vario Elmarit f/2.8-3.5 14-50mm
zoom lens (equivalent to 28-100mm in 35mm format) and 7+ megapixel sensor, it
is a member of the Four/Thirds family. That allows you to use any lens from
the Olympus and Sigma 4/3 mount offerings on the camera as well. It uses SD
cards, and takes the newest SDHC cards with greater storage capacity. And the
Leica lens uses Panasonic's OIS (optical image stabilization) that helps
you get steady shots in two to three less stops of light than usual when shooting
handheld. The body also has a Live View mode similar to the feature found in
Olympus' recent DSLRs.

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 27, 2006 0 comments

The New Pigment Ink Printers: How They Change Desktop Printing

by George Schaub

You wouldn't think that a small thing like changing the type of ink a
printer uses would have a profound effect on desktop photo printing, but that's
what the new products from Canon and HP might do. That change is offering pigment...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 24, 2007 0 comments

All Photos © 2007, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Here's a...

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 22, 2004 0 comments



Remember the shoebox, the place where all those snapshots were stored? It was
a great tradition to take a roll of film, share it with family and friends and
then dutifully deposit the pictures and negatives into a cardboard container that
would be stocked away on some closet shelf. Well, digital photography hasn't
changed that great tradition, but nowadays the "shoebox" is more likely
filled with CDs or DVDs that hold the pictures--only to be stacked away in that
same closet next to that snapshot shoebox.
Filed under
George Schaub Posted: May 10, 2005 0 comments

Backlight has been bedeviling photographers for years, particularly in landscape
pictures and those where you want to take a shot but simply showed up at your
location at the wrong time of day. Backlight in and of itself is not the problem;
it's how your meter behaves and how you make the reading that creates
it. Simply put, when the subject falls within its own shadow because the brightest
illumination is behind it the meter can be overwhelmed by the illumination and
"fooled" into thinking it has more light for the exposure than the
main subject dictates.

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 04, 2005 0 comments

High scene contrast always creates difficulties for photographers, whether
shooting film or digital. The difficulty stems from the difference between the
ways the film or sensor "sees" and how the human eye sees. Our eyes
are adaptive, and can resolve large variations in brightness by the way it scans
throughout the scene and the amazing reflex of automatically restricting and
dilating the pupil to adjust to bright and dark areas before us. While light
metering systems in cameras are impressive in the way they can read light, the
fact remains that at the moment of exposure the lens on a camera records a scene
at one fixed aperture, or opening. In most situations this is no problem, as
the meter averages light values and the bright and dark areas are distributed
through the recording medium properly. But high contrast presents a problem.

A
better solution is to use the --1 contrast setting. This
allows for smoother tonal gradations and addresses the need to
control the divergent light values in this backlit scene.

All Photos © George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

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