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George Schaub Posted: Sep 01, 2001 Published: Oct 01, 2001 0 comments

The long awaited and anticipated Nikon D1X arrived in our offices the other day, and we couldn't wait to get to work with it. To those who have worked with a Nikon D1 the camera offers similar handling and workflow, although there have...

George Schaub Posted: Sep 01, 2001 0 comments

Photographers have always been fascinated by super wide angle focal lengths. This focal length range, including 20mm, expands peripheral vision beyond the scope of human vision, and does so with a potential depth of field that makes...

George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2001 0 comments

Point-and-shoot zoom ranges keep getting more impressive. Not long ago the 35-105mm was the king; now, with Samsung's Maxima Elite 170QD we have a 4.4x zoom that stretches out to a rather incredible 170mm. Of course, point-and-shoot...

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George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2001 0 comments

What happens when you let
loose a team of crack photo and digital imaging reporters onto the floor
of America's biggest photo and digital imaging show? Read on.

Each year, the Photo Marketing...

George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2001 0 comments

When they first arrived on the scene digital SLRs were well beyond the means of all but the well heeled. News organizations, sports photojournalists, government photographers, and the corporate world were the first to take advantage of the new tech...

George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2002 Published: Mar 01, 2001 0 comments

The Olympus Camedia E-20N is the latest in their series of high-end digital cameras that straddle the line between consumer and professional markets. Although the E-20N does not offer interchangeable lenses, it stretches the envelope on the consumer side by offering features and abilities that outstrip...

George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2001 Published: Aug 01, 2000 0 comments

Professional photographers need a snapshot camera, too. But they require one that delivers the sharpness they have come to expect in their working cameras and a quality look and feel. Happily, there is a small, and somewhat pricey class...

George Schaub Posted: Jun 01, 2000 0 comments

The digital camera market has seen a lot of new introductions lately, many of which are in the 3.3Mp family. There have also been many introductions of cameras with less pixel power, all priced accordingly. Along with this range of prices and pixel packing has come an understanding of when and...

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 04, 2005 0 comments

High scene contrast always creates difficulties for photographers, whether
shooting film or digital. The difficulty stems from the difference between the
ways the film or sensor "sees" and how the human eye sees. Our eyes
are adaptive, and can resolve large variations in brightness by the way it scans
throughout the scene and the amazing reflex of automatically restricting and
dilating the pupil to adjust to bright and dark areas before us. While light
metering systems in cameras are impressive in the way they can read light, the
fact remains that at the moment of exposure the lens on a camera records a scene
at one fixed aperture, or opening. In most situations this is no problem, as
the meter averages light values and the bright and dark areas are distributed
through the recording medium properly. But high contrast presents a problem.

A
better solution is to use the --1 contrast setting. This
allows for smoother tonal gradations and addresses the need to
control the divergent light values in this backlit scene.

All Photos © George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 26, 2006 0 comments

One look at the specs of this new Tamron zoom and you'll understand why
it's immediately attractive to anyone carrying around a digital SLR in
their day bag. Weighing in at around 15 oz and measuring just under 3x3.2",
the lens is quite the marvel of size for what it delivers in focal length and
aperture options. Indeed, if someone told me that a constant aperture, 17mm
wide lens would be this size a few years back I'd have thought they had
lost their optical marbles. To be fair, however, that 17mm is not really a 17mm
in 35mm equivalent, thus practical terms, and I wonder why lenses like this
are still labeled that way. This lens is only for APS-C sensors, which means
it has the "35mm equivalent" of a 27mm wide angle view and 80mm
tele.


Tamron's new 17-50mm zoom, available in Canon, Nikon, Konica
Minolta (read Sony), and Pentax (read Samsung) mounts is highly
portable and compact.

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