George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 05, 2011 1 comments

The Samsung NX100 is the compact version of Samsung’s new NX-CSC-system. The camera has a retro design that looks like a classical view finder camera but is a modern digital system with a large LCD screen on the back. The superb AMOLED screen uses 614,000 RGB dots and displays a very brilliant image. The camera offers a standard accessory shoe on the top and a special digital interface right below the shoe. Samsung offers a lot of accessories for the N100: The most important attachment are the optional electronic view finder ED-EVF10, the GPS-tracker ED-GPS10 and two flash systems.

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 29, 2005 0 comments

One of the reasons that many people are getting into making prints at home
these days is that inkjet prints are simpler to make and more permanent than,
in many cases, photographic prints (dye based projection, that is.) With recent
advances in ink and paper technology from companies such as Epson and HP we
now see the potential, given proper storage, of digital prints lasting more
than 100 years. Even snapshot size prints, according to Wilhelm Research, from
portable printers like the popular and relatively diminutive PictureMate from
Epson can last three generations or more. And most of the newer printers don't
even require the intermediary of the computer to make very good looking prints.

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 31, 2006 0 comments

First Look: Canon Digital Rebel XTi

by George Schaub

The Canon Digital Rebel line accomplished a number of things. It broke the
$1000 DSLR price barrier, with room to spare, and as a result brought DSLR photography
into the mainstream. What followed is history, with other makers bringing forth
their "bargain"...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 05, 2010 0 comments

The Leica X1 looks like an analog camera. It has a compact body with a high quality finish and offers two setup dials on the top. If both dials are set to A-mode the camera will set aperture and shutter speed value automatically. If the photographer changes the aperture setting manually to a value between f2,8 and f16 the camera will work in aperture priority mode and set up shutter speed automatically. Similarly, a change of the shutter speed dial and setting the aperture-dial to A will switch the Leica X1 into “shutter speed priority mode. It’s a very efficient and easy system. The camera doesn’t offer any scene modes.

The X1 is Leica’s newest compact camera. It is based on an APS-C-sized image sensor and a lens system with fixed focal length with 36mm (35mm film equivalent). The camera has a small and compact body, offers easy handling and creates very crisp images.

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 27, 2005 0 comments

The
Sprint PCS Samsung Multimedia Phone MM-A800



Much ado has been made of late of how camera phones will gut the lower-end digicam
market and how everyone will dump their 1-3MP digicams for these amazing multimedia
products. Having shot with a sub 1-megapixel phone a year back I shrugged and
moved on, deciding it was a fun toy that some might find useful but that image
quality was poor, even when compared with the lowliest of blister-pack dedicated
cameras. Word has gotten around that new, higher-megapixel phonecams are coming,
with 7 MP being the figure touted on one model available now overseas. In addition,
we just got word that Kodak is finally going to release their EasyShare One,
subject of a press conference last January, which is said to be a camera first
and then a web or phone connecting pictuire sender second. With all that in
mind I was intrigued by the new Samsung 2MP camphone sent to us by the folks
at Sprint, one that links up with Sprint's PCS Picture mail service.

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 29, 2006 0 comments

Nikon's New D80 Digital SLR

by George Schaub



The new Nikon D80 replaces the D70 and D70s, and becomes Nikon's mid-level
DSLR aimed squarely at photo enthusiasts and advanced amateurs. Having had a
brief time with the camera at a one-on-one session with Nikon, there are many
aspects that are marked improvement...

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George Schaub Posted: May 31, 2011 1 comments

Imagine yourself walking into a room where there are numerous objects covered with small mirrors. The mirrors follow the form and shape of the objects. The walls of the room have a slot that goes continuously around the entire room. Behind the slot is a light that shines into the room and that travels the entire distance, from wall to wall. As the light travels it passes through numerous color filters built into the slot. The light reflects off the mirror facets on the objects. You can also move throughout the room and observe the objects and the light by standing with the light coming in over your shoulder, from the side or even standing behind the objects as the light hits them.

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 06, 2009 6 comments

There was time when those seeking super-wide lenses for APS-C size sensor cameras didn’t have much choice, but new light gathering systems that distribute light evenly from lens to sensor, as well as new optical formulas from camera makers and independent lens manufacturers, have changed that point of view. The latest in this welcome new class of glass is from Tamron, with their 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 offering. Priced at around $500 (street) and weighing in at about 14 oz., the Tamron 10-24mm is useable for cameras that require “motor in the lens” operation, such as the Nikon D40X, on which this lens was tested.  The DiII designation tells you that this lens is for digital SLRs with APS-C sensors.

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 22, 2004 0 comments



Remember the shoebox, the place where all those snapshots were stored? It was
a great tradition to take a roll of film, share it with family and friends and
then dutifully deposit the pictures and negatives into a cardboard container that
would be stocked away on some closet shelf. Well, digital photography hasn't
changed that great tradition, but nowadays the "shoebox" is more likely
filled with CDs or DVDs that hold the pictures--only to be stacked away in that
same closet next to that snapshot shoebox.

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