George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: May 30, 2006 0 comments

In Brief

WD Passport Portable USB Drives

by George Schaub

It's clear that having a backup strategy when on the road can often make
the difference in image insurance. While downloading to your laptop to clear
your memory cards is now standard operating procedure, you should also consider
burni...

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 28, 2004 0 comments

Lexar Media, Inc. has introduced two new Professional CompactFlash Readers
designed to address professional photographers' need for almost instantaneous
data transfer and an improved project workflow. Built with material similar
to a digital camera, with a unique industrial design of hardened plastic and
rubber over mold, the new card readers can be easily stacked and daisy-chained
together for concurrent download of images. In addition, the new card readers
support Lexar's ActiveMemory System for improved photography workflow.


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George Schaub Posted: Dec 26, 2006 0 comments


All Photos © 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 29, 2005 0 comments

One of the reasons that many people are getting into making prints at home
these days is that inkjet prints are simpler to make and more permanent than,
in many cases, photographic prints (dye based projection, that is.) With recent
advances in ink and paper technology from companies such as Epson and HP we
now see the potential, given proper storage, of digital prints lasting more
than 100 years. Even snapshot size prints, according to Wilhelm Research, from
portable printers like the popular and relatively diminutive PictureMate from
Epson can last three generations or more. And most of the newer printers don't
even require the intermediary of the computer to make very good looking prints.

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 15, 2005 0 comments

The pixels that make up a digital image each have an "address",
a code that defines color, brightness and shades. When we make images with a
digital camera or from film with a scanner we are creating a matrix of pixels
that altogether create the illusion of a continuous tone image. These codes
are not dyes or even densities, but specific information as to how the computer
will interpret the colors and tonal values on the screen. It is only when we
make a print that we leave the "digital" world and enter the world
of dyes and pigments. Because each pixel has a code, basically a bunch of information
that is composed of bits and bytes, we can alter that code to change the "address",
or color and tonal look of every pixel. In this lesson we'll use the Replace
Color dialog box, found in most versions of Photoshop, or under other names
in other programs, to illustrate the point and give you an easy, fun way to
play with your pictures.

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 25, 2006 0 comments


Open an image in Photoshop, then evoke the dialog box at Filters>Alien...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 19, 2005 0 comments

When shooting film, especially slide film, color rendition is a matter of
matching the film's "personality" with the subject at hand.
You can choose films with high or "normal" color saturation, contrast
and color response. These two photos of a colorful Christmas toy soldier in
New York's Rockefeller Center show the differences between saturation
renditions. With a digital camera you can program in color saturation, "warmth"
and even color contrast, making every frame you shoot like an individual selection
of film.


Color Low Saturation

 


Color High Saturation Warm

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 31, 2006 0 comments

First Look: Canon Digital Rebel XTi

by George Schaub

The Canon Digital Rebel line accomplished a number of things. It broke the
$1000 DSLR price barrier, with room to spare, and as a result brought DSLR photography
into the mainstream. What followed is history, with other makers bringing forth
their "bargain"...

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 27, 2005 0 comments

The
Sprint PCS Samsung Multimedia Phone MM-A800



Much ado has been made of late of how camera phones will gut the lower-end digicam
market and how everyone will dump their 1-3MP digicams for these amazing multimedia
products. Having shot with a sub 1-megapixel phone a year back I shrugged and
moved on, deciding it was a fun toy that some might find useful but that image
quality was poor, even when compared with the lowliest of blister-pack dedicated
cameras. Word has gotten around that new, higher-megapixel phonecams are coming,
with 7 MP being the figure touted on one model available now overseas. In addition,
we just got word that Kodak is finally going to release their EasyShare One,
subject of a press conference last January, which is said to be a camera first
and then a web or phone connecting pictuire sender second. With all that in
mind I was intrigued by the new Samsung 2MP camphone sent to us by the folks
at Sprint, one that links up with Sprint's PCS Picture mail service.

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