George Schaub

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
George Schaub Posted: May 10, 2005 0 comments

Backlight has been bedeviling photographers for years, particularly in landscape
pictures and those where you want to take a shot but simply showed up at your
location at the wrong time of day. Backlight in and of itself is not the problem;
it's how your meter behaves and how you make the reading that creates
it. Simply put, when the subject falls within its own shadow because the brightest
illumination is behind it the meter can be overwhelmed by the illumination and
"fooled" into thinking it has more light for the exposure than the
main subject dictates.

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Sep 26, 2006 0 comments

One look at the specs of this new Tamron zoom and you'll understand why
it's immediately attractive to anyone carrying around a digital SLR in
their day bag. Weighing in at around 15 oz and measuring just under 3x3.2",
the lens is quite the marvel of size for what it delivers in focal length and
aperture options. Indeed, if someone told me that a constant aperture, 17mm
wide lens would be this size a few years back I'd have thought they had
lost their optical marbles. To be fair, however, that 17mm is not really a 17mm
in 35mm equivalent, thus practical terms, and I wonder why lenses like this
are still labeled that way. This lens is only for APS-C sensors, which means
it has the "35mm equivalent" of a 27mm wide angle view and 80mm
tele.


Tamron's new 17-50mm zoom, available in Canon, Nikon, Konica
Minolta (read Sony), and Pentax (read Samsung) mounts is highly
portable and compact.

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: May 30, 2006 0 comments

In Brief

WD Passport Portable USB Drives

by George Schaub

It's clear that having a backup strategy when on the road can often make
the difference in image insurance. While downloading to your laptop to clear
your memory cards is now standard operating procedure, you should also consider
burni...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Mar 27, 2007 0 comments

The Case for Center Weighted Metering

by George Schaub

While today's multi-pattern metering system found in most DSLRs are marvels
of technology, you'll notice that almost every DSLR also has other metering
pattern options. The two main options, with variants available on some cameras,
are center-weightedaver...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jul 26, 2005 0 comments

If you have Photoshop Elements or the full version of Photoshop
you can also use a tool called "Save for Web" to resize your images.
(Note that other programs might also have this feature under a different name.)
This is an automated way to get your images the right size for sharing. To get
to this toolbox just go to File>Save for Web, with the image already open
on your desktop.

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Oct 04, 2004 0 comments

SanDisk
Corporation has introduced the world's fastest flash memory cards --
the SanDisk Extreme III line of CompactFlash, SD and Memory Stick PRO digital
film cards. The CompactFlash and SD cards have minimum write and read speeds
of 20 megabytes per second (MB/sec.).Memory Stick PRO has minimum write and
read speeds of 18 MB/sec. The SanDisk Extreme III cards, which range in capacity
between one and four gigabytes (GB), have essentially double the performance
speeds of SanDisk's predecessor Extreme product line which currently has
the fastest working cards in many of today's leading digital single lens
reflex (SLR) cameras.

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Mar 15, 2005 0 comments

The pixels that make up a digital image each have an "address",
a code that defines color, brightness and shades. When we make images with a
digital camera or from film with a scanner we are creating a matrix of pixels
that altogether create the illusion of a continuous tone image. These codes
are not dyes or even densities, but specific information as to how the computer
will interpret the colors and tonal values on the screen. It is only when we
make a print that we leave the "digital" world and enter the world
of dyes and pigments. Because each pixel has a code, basically a bunch of information
that is composed of bits and bytes, we can alter that code to change the "address",
or color and tonal look of every pixel. In this lesson we'll use the Replace
Color dialog box, found in most versions of Photoshop, or under other names
in other programs, to illustrate the point and give you an easy, fun way to
play with your pictures.

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Apr 25, 2006 0 comments


Open an image in Photoshop, then evoke the dialog box at Filters>Alien...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Dec 26, 2006 0 comments


All Photos © 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jun 21, 2005 0 comments

Now I know how stagecoach drivers felt when they saw those first rail lines
being laid over their routes. The recent announcement that Kodak would be discontinuing
their silver black and white papers didn't come as much as a shock as
an inevitability that one always hopes will not be manifest. With inventories
expected to last a few months, we're now witnessing the disappearance
of venerable brands such as Polycontrast IV, Azo and Polymax Fine Art, Kodabrome
II and Portra, even their "Digital Black and White" paper, which
was used for digital printers. According to a Kodak spokesperson, Kodak has
seen a cumulative drop in black and white paper buying of 25% per year over
the past few years and could no longer justify being in the market. We also
learned, by the way, that Kodak black and white papers had of late been produced
in Brazil, being packaged from rolls in Rochester. The spokesperson did stress,
however, that Kodak black and white film and chemistry was not on the chopping
block and that Kodak sees silver photography as still extremely viable.

...

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading