George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 27, 2007 0 comments

The Case for Center Weighted Metering

by George Schaub

While today's multi-pattern metering system found in most DSLRs are marvels
of technology, you'll notice that almost every DSLR also has other metering
pattern options. The two main options, with variants available on some cameras,
are center-weightedaver...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 15, 2005 0 comments

The pixels that make up a digital image each have an "address",
a code that defines color, brightness and shades. When we make images with a
digital camera or from film with a scanner we are creating a matrix of pixels
that altogether create the illusion of a continuous tone image. These codes
are not dyes or even densities, but specific information as to how the computer
will interpret the colors and tonal values on the screen. It is only when we
make a print that we leave the "digital" world and enter the world
of dyes and pigments. Because each pixel has a code, basically a bunch of information
that is composed of bits and bytes, we can alter that code to change the "address",
or color and tonal look of every pixel. In this lesson we'll use the Replace
Color dialog box, found in most versions of Photoshop, or under other names
in other programs, to illustrate the point and give you an easy, fun way to
play with your pictures.

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 25, 2006 0 comments


Open an image in Photoshop, then evoke the dialog box at Filters>Alien...

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 22, 2004 0 comments



Remember the shoebox, the place where all those snapshots were stored? It was
a great tradition to take a roll of film, share it with family and friends and
then dutifully deposit the pictures and negatives into a cardboard container that
would be stocked away on some closet shelf. Well, digital photography hasn't
changed that great tradition, but nowadays the "shoebox" is more likely
filled with CDs or DVDs that hold the pictures--only to be stacked away in that
same closet next to that snapshot shoebox.
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George Schaub Posted: Dec 26, 2006 0 comments


All Photos © 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 05, 2011 1 comments

The Samsung NX100 is the compact version of Samsung’s new NX-CSC-system. The camera has a retro design that looks like a classical view finder camera but is a modern digital system with a large LCD screen on the back. The superb AMOLED screen uses 614,000 RGB dots and displays a very brilliant image. The camera offers a standard accessory shoe on the top and a special digital interface right below the shoe. Samsung offers a lot of accessories for the N100: The most important attachment are the optional electronic view finder ED-EVF10, the GPS-tracker ED-GPS10 and two flash systems.

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 26, 2005 0 comments

If you have Photoshop Elements or the full version of Photoshop
you can also use a tool called "Save for Web" to resize your images.
(Note that other programs might also have this feature under a different name.)
This is an automated way to get your images the right size for sharing. To get
to this toolbox just go to File>Save for Web, with the image already open
on your desktop.

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 31, 2006 0 comments

First Look: Canon Digital Rebel XTi

by George Schaub

The Canon Digital Rebel line accomplished a number of things. It broke the
$1000 DSLR price barrier, with room to spare, and as a result brought DSLR photography
into the mainstream. What followed is history, with other makers bringing forth
their "bargain"...

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George Schaub Posted: May 10, 2005 0 comments

Backlight has been bedeviling photographers for years, particularly in landscape
pictures and those where you want to take a shot but simply showed up at your
location at the wrong time of day. Backlight in and of itself is not the problem;
it's how your meter behaves and how you make the reading that creates
it. Simply put, when the subject falls within its own shadow because the brightest
illumination is behind it the meter can be overwhelmed by the illumination and
"fooled" into thinking it has more light for the exposure than the
main subject dictates.

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