George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 27, 2007 0 comments

The Case for Center Weighted Metering

by George Schaub

While today's multi-pattern metering system found in most DSLRs are marvels
of technology, you'll notice that almost every DSLR also has other metering
pattern options. The two main options, with variants available on some cameras,
are center-weightedaver...

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 07, 2005 0 comments

The digital darkroom has made it simple to accomplish print and image effects
that would have taken hours in the chemical darkroom environment. While the
learning curve can be steep (as it certainly was for the chemical darkroom,
at least if you wanted good results) the ease with which some tasks can be accomplished
is almost...well, embarrassing, at least to those who once labored in the
amber-lit confines of the darkroom.

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George Schaub Posted: May 24, 2005 0 comments

While the usual photographic rules, such as using shutter speed to portray motion
(slow to blur, fast to freeze) and using focal length, aperture and camera-to-subject
distance to create a certain depth of field apply to both film and digital photography,
digital offers some intriguing options for making camera settings. In some cases
these settings relate to film photography settings, or choosing a specific film
for its "personality", but with digital you can alter these settings
on every frame you shoot and not be restricted to the attributes of a particular
film you might have loaded in the camera.

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 15, 2005 0 comments

The pixels that make up a digital image each have an "address",
a code that defines color, brightness and shades. When we make images with a
digital camera or from film with a scanner we are creating a matrix of pixels
that altogether create the illusion of a continuous tone image. These codes
are not dyes or even densities, but specific information as to how the computer
will interpret the colors and tonal values on the screen. It is only when we
make a print that we leave the "digital" world and enter the world
of dyes and pigments. Because each pixel has a code, basically a bunch of information
that is composed of bits and bytes, we can alter that code to change the "address",
or color and tonal look of every pixel. In this lesson we'll use the Replace
Color dialog box, found in most versions of Photoshop, or under other names
in other programs, to illustrate the point and give you an easy, fun way to
play with your pictures.

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 25, 2006 0 comments


Open an image in Photoshop, then evoke the dialog box at Filters>Alien...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 26, 2006 0 comments


All Photos © 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

There are times when we have images that are too dark or too light and often
reject them out of hand. But the values only need to be adjusted to bring what
might have sat in shadow into the light. We can do that selectively with certain
tonal areas in the print or globally--that is, on the entire image. This
web how-to covers revealing what might sit in the shadows and deals with a very
simple global adjustment. The work is done here in Photoshop, but many other
image manipulation programs have similar controls.

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 09, 2004 0 comments

While you can choose enhanced color saturation when using your digital camera
via the Menu, this choice generally adds saturation to all colors at once. This
might work fine for some subjects, but there are many ways to "juice up"
selective colors later in the software. We'll work with two controls here,
Hue/Saturation and Selective Color, both used as Adjustment Layers.


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George Schaub Posted: Jan 05, 2011 1 comments

The Samsung NX100 is the compact version of Samsung’s new NX-CSC-system. The camera has a retro design that looks like a classical view finder camera but is a modern digital system with a large LCD screen on the back. The superb AMOLED screen uses 614,000 RGB dots and displays a very brilliant image. The camera offers a standard accessory shoe on the top and a special digital interface right below the shoe. Samsung offers a lot of accessories for the N100: The most important attachment are the optional electronic view finder ED-EVF10, the GPS-tracker ED-GPS10 and two flash systems.

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 31, 2006 0 comments

First Look: Canon Digital Rebel XTi

by George Schaub

The Canon Digital Rebel line accomplished a number of things. It broke the
$1000 DSLR price barrier, with room to spare, and as a result brought DSLR photography
into the mainstream. What followed is history, with other makers bringing forth
their "bargain"...

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