Photo Accessory Reviews

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Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Aug 20, 2015  |  1 comments

I’m as bad as the next guy when it comes to tripods. I know I should know better—they’re the only accessory you can buy that has the potential to improve every single picture you take. I’ve written about tripods at least a hundred times. That said, there have been too many occasions when I’ve been two-legged when I should have used three.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 01, 2022  |  0 comments

Easy-to-carry travel tripods are more popular than ever, as photographers have turned to mirrorless cameras and correspondingly small lenses to lighten their load. The challenge is finding an appropriately robust model that doesn’t sacrifice stability, quality and features—just to be small.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 22, 2023  |  0 comments

The Vanguard VEO 3T+ 234AB aluminum travel tripod is the quick change artist I’ve been looking for. It’s light, folds to just a hair over 18 inches, and is about the most versatile tripod I’ve used in a long time. Plus...

George Schaub  |  Jul 18, 2012  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2012  |  2 comments

Wacom recently introduced their new line of Bamboo tablets, and we thought we’d revisit the use of stylus and tablet tools to give it a try. For our test we worked with the Bamboo Capture, described by the company as most apt for enthusiast digital photographers, although there are three intros in this new line.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Apr 30, 2020  |  0 comments

If you are looking for an absorbing creative project to enjoy during this temporary virus lockdown, look here first. Wacom’s Intuos Pro graphic tablets are extremely powerful—but still easy to learn—and more affordable than you may think.

Jon Canfield  |  Nov 20, 2012  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2012  |  0 comments

I’ve been a long-time user of Wacom graphic tablets as part of my editing workflow. Making selections, painting a mask, and many other operations are not only more intuitive with a pen, but you have much finer control than you do with a mouse or trackpad. Until now, the Intuos4 Wireless tablet with Bluetooth has been what I considered to be as close to perfect as you could get. Used either left- or right-handed, I can have it plugged in via USB or use with Bluetooth when traveling or when I need to be a bit further from the computer, as when I’m teaching a workshop. When Wacom announced the Intuos5, I was curious as to what could possibly be improved upon from the current model, so I was anxious to take a look.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Nov 24, 2023  |  0 comments

Experience the thrill of precisely and accurately editing photos and other graphic creations directly on the actual image as it's displayed on the new Wacom One 13 Touch 13.3-inch screen using a battery-free, pressure sensitive Wacom digital pen. The Wacom One 13 Touch is easy to use, affordable and enormous fun—here is our hands-on REVIEW.

Jon Canfield  |  Aug 10, 2009  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2009  |  0 comments

Wacom is probably the best known name and certainly one of the most popular brands around.

Jack Neubart  |  Dec 13, 2013  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2013  |  3 comments

The conventional camera strap does the job, but with some gear can put considerable strain on the neck, tempting you to hang your camera from the shoulder, where it may slip off or invite thieves. Like a good backpack, today’s ergonomically designed camera-carrying systems largely relieve that stress and throw in some extras in the bargain. New age straps feature a more comfortable neck/shoulder pad than found on conventional neck straps, so you’ll still be comfortable hours later, and often with a quick-release mechanism to rapidly detach the camera when the need arises. Many are of a sling design aimed at the “quick shooters” among you, and some are so innovative as to almost defy description. A few even let you comfortably and safely carry two cameras at the same time.

George Schaub  |  Feb 01, 2010  |  0 comments

The latest manifestation of desktop back-up devices from Western Digital, the My Book Studio Edition II, makes what might have seemed to some as a difficult task—backing up and retrieving image and other files—quite easy.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jun 04, 2015  |  0 comments

Before you get any ideas about drafting a posse and coming after me with tar and feathers because of my computer platform preferences, let me explain—please. Because I write about digital photography I must use both PCs and Macs so that I can deliver balanced stories and explain computer functions to our entire audience, not just one group or the other.

Ron Leach  |  Jul 21, 2022  |  1 comments

Ask any experienced landscape photographer to identify the most important tool in his bag, and the answer is likely to be, “My ND filter.” Or more accurately, “My set of ND filters.”

Dan Havlik  |  Jan 30, 2019  |  0 comments

More and more Shutterbug readers are launching their own photography vlogging channels to share their work and wisdom, so we thought we’d spread the news about this latest tripod “find” from popular photo vlogger Peter McKinnon. In the below video, McKinnon talks about why he likes the new SwitchPod, which is designed as a “minimal, versatile, handheld tripod.”

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 23, 2019  |  0 comments

What fits in your shirt pocket, delivers perfect white balance and accurate color from your camera, assures the same color from all of your cameras and is a snap to use? It’s the ColorChecker Passport Photo 2 from X-Rite, a hardware-software combination that creates color profiles with just a couple mouse clicks. If you thought creating a color profile was difficult or overly technical, think again. Now there’s no excuse to not get the colors right – or should I say X-Rite?

Jon Canfield  |  Nov 19, 2013  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2013  |  0 comments

Color calibration is the key to obtaining an accurate reproduction of what you saw when capturing the image, and what is reproduced on screen or paper. It’s long been considered a bit of black magic as to how it is done, what with terms like gamma, color temperatures, luminance, and the like as part of the mix, but the simple fact is that unless you’re working on a calibrated display you don’t quite know whether the greens, blues, or other colors you are seeing are actually what everyone else is going to see, or what you’re getting when you look at the print you’ve made.

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