Nature Photography How To

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Barry Tanenbaum  |  Aug 22, 2017  |  0 comments

Spend even a short time looking at Jackie Tran’s spectacular landscape and cityscape photos and it won’t come as a surprise to learn he’s a graphic designer as well as a photographer. His years of design experience are apparent in the way his compositions use lines, shapes, and colors to draw viewers into and around his images. 

Ron Leach  |  Dec 20, 2016  |  0 comments

Muhhammad Roem considers himself an “amateur” photographer, but you wouldn’t know that from looking at the incredible close-up images he shoots of insects and other critters.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Jul 21, 2014  |  0 comments

The beautiful designs and colors that can be found in the feathers of many species of birds offer wonderful photo opportunities. You can create frame-filling shots of unique patterns, and it’s also possible to make interesting arrangements of the feathers that become a unique art form unto itself.

Staff  |  Jul 19, 2016  |  0 comments

Shutterbug reader Bill Tiepelman captured this profile of a beautiful red-bellied woodpecker in his backyard in Wentzville, Missouri. An avid bird watcher, Tiepelman has on old swing set in his backyard that he repurposed into a bird sanctuary in an effort to “attract as many species as possible.”

Staff  |  Aug 23, 2016  |  0 comments

While Shutterbug reader Robert Dunham dreams of shooting the vast landscapes in Montana, he has found “great wonder and satisfaction in shooting macro” at his North Carolina home. He combines his two favorite pastimes, gardening and photography, by “taking a bunch of gear to the garden and splitting time between the spade and the camera.”

Lynne Eodice  |  Apr 01, 2005  |  1 comments

Besides photographing people, nature ranks among the most popular subjects. Much of this appeal comes from the fact that there's a sense of wonder and mystery at the beauty of flora and fauna. Through photography, we can express our fascination with flowers and share it with others. Whether you enjoy shooting close-ups of a bud unfolding, or a field of wildflowers in the...

Henry Anderson  |  Jul 28, 2021  |  0 comments

Bad habits can ruin you landscape photography and if you want to get better sometimes it's just a case of changing your behavior. Landscape photographer Mark Denney knows a lot about fixing bad habits in order to capture winning images. He admits he's been dealing with them since he started in photography.

Ron Leach  |  Nov 18, 2020  |  0 comments

One sure way to ruin an otherwise great photo is to miss the exposure and end up with ugly blown-out highlights. The problem typically occurs with landscape images when the sun peaks out from behind the clouds. But this unsightly mistake also happens with other types of images—both indoors and out—and doesn’t necessarily mean you have to blow off the shot.

Ron Leach  |  Mar 02, 2021  |  0 comments

We frequently post tutorials explaining common photography mistakes so you can learn from the errors of others. While these lessons are typically geared toward novice photographers, the video below includes mistakes that even experienced shooters make on occasion.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Jul 21, 2014  |  0 comments

I’m sure that everyone who has ever owned a camera has taken pictures of flowers. It’s impossible not to. Flowers are too beautiful to resist, and there are so many species and varieties that you could devote your entire life to shooting nothing but flowers and hardly scratch the surface.

Ron Leach  |  Mar 11, 2021  |  0 comments

You’ve no doubt marveled at spectacular landscape photos with depth of field that seems impossible to achieve with anything other than a tilt-shift lens or a large format view camera. Surprise: The same effect can be accomplished in post processing with a technique known at focus stacking. And it far easier to do than you may think.

Ron Leach  |  Jul 12, 2021  |  0 comments

Proper focusing techniques are essential for all types of photography, whether you’re shooting indoors or outside. This is particular true with travel and nature images that include a variety of elements from near to far. Do things right and you’ve captured a winning shot—otherwise it’s just another missed opportunity.

Dan Havlik  |  Nov 04, 2020  |  0 comments

Good landscape composition is one of the easiest things to understand but, perhaps, one of the most difficult things to explain in photography. It's like that old saying: "I don't know much about art, but I know what I like."

Josh Miller  |  May 21, 2012  |  26 comments

Since the development of photography in the early 1800s, there has always been a strong tradition of photographers using their work to promote conservation and social justice issues. One need only to look at the development of the National Park System in the United States to see the impact early photographers had on conservation. William Henry Jackson, with his 1871 Yellowstone photographs, helped push through legislation that established Yellowstone as the world’s first National Park. Another well-known example of a conservationist photographer was Ansel Adams, whose tireless efforts both as a photographer and as a 37-year member of the Sierra Club’s Board of Directors led to the establishment of Kings Canyon National Park in 1940.

Mike Stensvold  |  Nov 01, 2005  |  1 comments

Close-up photography--taking pictures at very close range--can provide a different outlook on everyday things, reveal details unseen by the naked eye, and turn common objects into intriguing abstract images.

The traditional ways to do close-up photography involves special gear: Simple close-up diopter lenses are inexpensive but reduce sharpness noticeably...

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