Pro Techniques

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Lorin R. Robinson  |  May 02, 2014  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2014  |  0 comments

Caving,” “spelunking,” “potholing.” Whatever you call it, this subterranean activity is not for everyone. There’s even a phobia that keeps some out of caves—speluncaphobia. Then, of course, there’s fear of darkness (achluophobia) and the rather more common claustrophobia—fear of no escape from small or enclosed spaces.

Mike Ware  |  Mar 01, 2011  |  1 comments

For its first 160 years, photography was based on silver. Effectively all camera negatives have to be made of this metal because only silver halides are fast enough to record analog chemical images “instantaneously”—or even in a couple of minutes. But printing from the negative need not be speedy, so the door is open to several slower photochemical processes for printmaking.

Rosalind Smith  |  Jan 01, 2006  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2007  |  0 comments

How do you translate an idea into an image? Or convert words into a photograph? How can a picture create a sense of fear and is this fear something we are born with? Perfect pitch... How might you define this phenomenon with your camera? Or hypergraphia, the compulsive need to write?

These were among the puzzles that confronted Cary Wolinsky for his story on...

Suzanne Driscoll  |  May 14, 2013  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2013  |  1 comments

Actor Richard Gere is best known for his roles in over 40 films, but few may be aware he is also an avid photographer and collector. Taking pictures on his many trips to India was always more of a personal project, until photography book and exhibition designer Elizabeth Avedon happened to notice a 3-foot stack of beautiful 8x10 photos in his loft. “A lot of these photographs I didn’t show anyone because it was such a private experience for me,” Gere recalls. “I had no interest in sharing them.” Fortunately, Avedon was able to convince him they needed to be seen, and these and other photos have been exhibited around the world and published in his book, Pilgrim.

Hugh O. Smith  |  Nov 01, 2009  |  1 comments

Pinhole photography, long popular in Japan and China, has caught on with a vengeance here in the US.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jul 29, 2011  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2011  |  2 comments
Years ago Dale Huncovsky, owner of the only grocery in Cuba, Kansas, had a heart bypass operation. Since then several men from town show up once a week at Dale’s store to unload the semi that brings the week’s supply of groceries. That’s how the personal and the practical play out in Cuba.
David B. Brooks  |  Jun 01, 2009  |  0 comments

I don’t know of any other film brand that also became the title of a hit song like Paul Simon’s “Kodachrome,” released in 1973.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Nov 01, 2006  |  0 comments

It's impossible to be a serious digital photographer without learning at least a little bit about computers. Some people take to computer technology like kids take to dirt, but many never get beyond e-mail and Photoshop. Don't get me wrong--that's not bad--but when the need to upgrade arises, the folks who are short on computer skills sometimes think...

Frances E. Schultz  |  Jun 01, 2010  |  2 comments

In the entry hall of our house, there is a picture of two young sisters. When the picture was taken, Marion was 14 years old and Helen was 7. That was in the mid-1920s. Marion was my mother; Helen, my aunt. Both are dead now.

The oldest picture in my family album is probably the portrait of Franklin Corbin. He died in Andersonville prison during the Civil War.

...

David C. Schultz  |  Dec 31, 2013  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2013  |  2 comments

Seeing what was about to hit us I quickly grabbed for a table I knew was anchored to the floor, but it was too little, too late. Along with a number of other staff and passengers I was thrown to the floor and found myself rolling from starboard to port, bouncing off chairs and tables along the way. I knew the ship would very quickly start to roll in the opposite direction, so no attempt was made to stand. Instead I waited on the floor, arms wrapped around a table leg, for a moment of relative calm. Good morning, and welcome to the Drake Passage.

Norm Haughey  |  Apr 01, 2008  |  0 comments

The impact and success of a studio portrait is often the combined result of lighting, composition, body language, lens choice, camera angle, clothing, color, texture, and even luck. With a few portrait techniques under your belt, however, your luck will improve dramatically. There are many portrait-making methods that can help you develop your own style over time and ultimately...

Fred Collins  |  Jun 01, 2009  |  0 comments

When I think about all of the photography equipment I have added to my collection over the years—cameras, lenses, lights—I would have to put my finger on the raw conversion window in Photoshop as probably the most effective tool I currently have for making my images look good. It has even lightened the load in terms of the amount of equipment I use for taking the shot in the first...

Stan Trzoniec  |  Jul 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Photographers, by nature, love accessories. But sooner or later we all have to face the fact that we can only carry so much equipment. When I go out I go through a mental check list and include the basic equipment that I've outlined in this article. Please keep in mind this is my personal list; vary yours to suit the terrain, subject, and distance covered.

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Howard Millard  |  Nov 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Recently, I attended several excellent Photoshop seminars presented by Software-Cinema.com. These were held in a large meeting room of a city hotel with some 200 people in attendance. Photographic images from the presenter's laptop were projected on an enormous screen, with great clarity and color saturation. They must be using a very expensive projector, I assumed. After...

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