George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 21, 2005 0 comments

Now I know how stagecoach drivers felt when they saw those first rail lines
being laid over their routes. The recent announcement that Kodak would be discontinuing
their silver black and white papers didn't come as much as a shock as
an inevitability that one always hopes will not be manifest. With inventories
expected to last a few months, we're now witnessing the disappearance
of venerable brands such as Polycontrast IV, Azo and Polymax Fine Art, Kodabrome
II and Portra, even their "Digital Black and White" paper, which
was used for digital printers. According to a Kodak spokesperson, Kodak has
seen a cumulative drop in black and white paper buying of 25% per year over
the past few years and could no longer justify being in the market. We also
learned, by the way, that Kodak black and white papers had of late been produced
in Brazil, being packaged from rolls in Rochester. The spokesperson did stress,
however, that Kodak black and white film and chemistry was not on the chopping
block and that Kodak sees silver photography as still extremely viable.

...

George Schaub Posted: Jul 11, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments

If you, like me, had come to associate “watercolor” with a stippled and rough surface, my first tip on this paper is not to be concerned with the moniker. It is a somewhat rough surface, but more in its tooth than its topography, and is more akin to high-quality painting stock than some of the stuff that had been passed off as watercolor inkjet in the past. And while this paper might be aimed at the “fine art” market (reproduction of paintings and drawings for portfolios and presentation and possible sale) it is also quite apt for photographers who want rich color on an “archival,” matte/textured surface. Epson describes the surface as “unique,” and you can feel and “hear” the surface as you run your thumb over it. I found that while the surface texture is somewhat rough it does not intrude on the ink laydown; in fact, it seems to enhance it.

George Schaub Posted: May 15, 2015 4 comments

Epson announced two new scanners last year for those who want to archive their film files and/or create wall-worthy prints from their negatives and slides. The Epson Perfection V800 Photo and V850 Pro allow for scanning all sizes up to 4x5 inches using the supplied frames, and up to 8x10 inches without them, including creating contact sheets. While the V850 Pro is the subject of this review, I’ll outline features and differences between the two as we go.

George Schaub Posted: Feb 07, 2013 Published: Jan 01, 2013 1 comments

There are those who make prints often, and there are those who make prints occasionally. The split, you might think, is between amateur and pro, but that’s not always the case. Some “amateurs” print as much if not more than some pros, and some pros make their own prints only when they have time, usually for their personal portfolio, but certainly not on every job. That’s why pigeonholing the Epson R3000 in terms of intended audience, amateur or pro, is not so easy. It certainly delivers the quality you might expect from a higher-end Epson model, given its attributes, ink set, fine nozzles, and highly evolved print head, etc., but it’s by no means a volume/production printer, given its single sheet feed for “art” paper, albeit with larger capacity ink carts than some past 13x19” printers, and roll feed capability.

George Schaub Posted: Aug 18, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 2 comments

I took on this review assignment because I’ve had considerable history with printing, both silver and digital, and printing with Epson printers. Over the past few years this interest has led me on an odyssey through various printers, profiling, and a considerable amount of (early) frustration. My emphasis has been on monochrome printing and those who share in this interest and who have attempted black-and-white printing in the past understand the numerous obstacles it can present. Those include, but are not limited to, unwanted color casts, gloss differential in deep black areas and some tonal borders, poor deep black reproduction (accompanied by equally poor highlight repro), a lot of poor paper surfaces, and the hassle and waste of switching from matte black to photo glossy inks. Color printers face these as well, plus the challenges of color balance, casts, skin tone reproduction, highlight bias, green shadows, and more. Of late I have printed with the Epson Stylus Pro 3800, 3880, and 4800 models, the 3800 being my studio workhorse for years and the 3880 the model that many photo schools and workshops at which I’ve taught use as a mainstay student and production printer.

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2007 0 comments

I enjoy it when a new product arrives that holds a surprise right out of the box. The surprise with Epson's new PowerLite 1715c projector is when you first lift it out of its shoulder bag carrying case--it's the lightest projector you will probably have lifted, slide or digital. Weighing in at under 4 lbs (3.7 to be exact) and 3.1x10.7x7.6" in overall size...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2007 0 comments

Specifications

Projection System: Epson original 3LCD technology
Projection Method: Front/rear/ceiling mount
LCD: Driving method: Epson High Temperature Poly-Silicon TFT, Pixel number: 786,432 dots x 3 (1024 x 768) LCDs, Native resolution: XGA , Aspect ratio: 4:3 (supports 16:9, 5:4), Pixel...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2005 0 comments

The kitchen sink mentality these days is called a "convergence device," something that does many things wrapped up in one unit. With their Stylus Photo RX620 Epson has made such a device that can be used as a family photo printing, copying, downloading, photo restoring, scanning device, etc. In short, it does just about anything you'd like with photos and prints...

George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

Having worked with and tested the Epson Stylus Pro 4800 (Shutterbug, November 2005 issue, or type Epson 4800 in the Search box on our homepage at www.shutterbug.com) I can attest to the fidelity and quality of the Epson UltraChrome K3 inks and to the reliability of this wide format, 17" wide printer. But there were two complaints I had about the printer, which I believe were...

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 01, 2005 4 comments

Here at Shutterbug we have followed the long and sometimes tortuous road toward getting quality black and white prints digital style. Readers, and we, have suffered through the rigors of metamerism, bronzing, and the associated color shifting and frustrated attempts to match what's on the screen with what comes out of the printer. We have tried duotones, third-party inks...

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