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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2007 0 comments

I enjoy it when a new product arrives that holds a surprise right out of the box. The surprise with Epson's new PowerLite 1715c projector is when you first lift it out of its shoulder bag carrying case--it's the lightest projector you will probably have lifted, slide or digital. Weighing in at under 4 lbs (3.7 to be exact) and 3.1x10.7x7.6" in overall size...

George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2007 0 comments

Specifications

Projection System: Epson original 3LCD technology
Projection Method: Front/rear/ceiling mount
LCD: Driving method: Epson High Temperature Poly-Silicon TFT, Pixel number: 786,432 dots x 3 (1024 x 768) LCDs, Native resolution: XGA , Aspect ratio: 4:3 (supports 16:9, 5:4), Pixel...

George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2005 0 comments

The kitchen sink mentality these days is called a "convergence device," something that does many things wrapped up in one unit. With their Stylus Photo RX620 Epson has made such a device that can be used as a family photo printing, copying, downloading, photo restoring, scanning device, etc. In short, it does just about anything you'd like with photos and prints...

George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

Having worked with and tested the Epson Stylus Pro 4800 (Shutterbug, November 2005 issue, or type Epson 4800 in the Search box on our homepage at www.shutterbug.com) I can attest to the fidelity and quality of the Epson UltraChrome K3 inks and to the reliability of this wide format, 17" wide printer. But there were two complaints I had about the printer, which I believe were...

George Schaub Posted: Nov 01, 2005 4 comments

Here at Shutterbug we have followed the long and sometimes tortuous road toward getting quality black and white prints digital style. Readers, and we, have suffered through the rigors of metamerism, bronzing, and the associated color shifting and frustrated attempts to match what's on the screen with what comes out of the printer. We have tried duotones, third-party inks...

George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

One of the mysteries of photography is Depth Of Field (DOF). It combines various factors, including camera to subject distance, focal length of the lens and aperture in use. You calculate all of the above and know what will appear sharp and unsharp in the image. Those who use fixed focal length lenses have had the advantage of having a DOF scale on the lens, which yields...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2010 0 comments
There are profound changes occurring on the exposure side of photography that will cause many of us to rethink how we read, and even approach light. As you know, contrast has always been the problem, one more or less attacked with the Zone System (exposure and development to place tonal values) and even slight overexposure of color negative film, where dye clouds rather than silver could be...
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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

Now we come to how exposure and creative photography go hand in hand.

Why would you need to change the aperture or shutter speed under different lighting conditions? Why would you want to use a fast shutter speed for one shot and a slow one for another? Why change apertures or ISO?

That goes to the heart of the photographic exposure system and is one of the most...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

When scene contrast is high there may be a danger of overexposure, particularly when you do not take care to read the highlight values to keep them well within the dynamic range capability of the sensor. When overexposure is extreme you lose detail in the subject, cause the image to look harsh, and may eliminate the possibility of making a good print from the photo, despite your best processing...

George Schaub Posted: Jun 24, 2015 0 comments

Exposure systems in digital cameras are highly sophisticated components that can analyze light, contrast, color and all the aspects of a photo instantly. Yet with all the automation and computerization there’s still the need to understand how to get the most from all the available options, to know when to choose a particular mode or metering pattern, when you can rely on automation and when you need to step in to get the best exposure possible. This set of tips deals with the creative use of the various Exposure modes, metering patterns, bracketing features and more.

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