Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jan 04, 2005 0 comments

High scene contrast always creates difficulties for photographers, whether
shooting film or digital. The difficulty stems from the difference between the
ways the film or sensor "sees" and how the human eye sees. Our eyes
are adaptive, and can resolve large variations in brightness by the way it scans
throughout the scene and the amazing reflex of automatically restricting and
dilating the pupil to adjust to bright and dark areas before us. While light
metering systems in cameras are impressive in the way they can read light, the
fact remains that at the moment of exposure the lens on a camera records a scene
at one fixed aperture, or opening. In most situations this is no problem, as
the meter averages light values and the bright and dark areas are distributed
through the recording medium properly. But high contrast presents a problem.

better solution is to use the --1 contrast setting. This
allows for smoother tonal gradations and addresses the need to
control the divergent light values in this backlit scene.

All Photos © George Schaub, All Rights Reserved


George Schaub Posted: May 26, 2015 0 comments

A camera enforces a “framing” of the world before you. While you can choose various aspect ratios (from standard to panoramic, from 3:4 to 6:19) the fact remains that you always have to choose what to include and what to leave out of the photo. It’s like constructing a box and deciding what to put inside it. Making those decisions often involves utilizing certain compositional guidelines and tools that artists have used in the past, although like any rules they “are made to be broken.” When deciding which guidelines to apply always remember that content rules, and that context helps tell the tale.

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Dec 26, 2006 0 comments

All Photos © 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: May 24, 2005 0 comments

While the usual photographic rules, such as using shutter speed to portray motion
(slow to blur, fast to freeze) and using focal length, aperture and camera-to-subject
distance to create a certain depth of field apply to both film and digital photography,
digital offers some intriguing options for making camera settings. In some cases
these settings relate to film photography settings, or choosing a specific film
for its "personality", but with digital you can alter these settings
on every frame you shoot and not be restricted to the attributes of a particular
film you might have loaded in the camera.


Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

There's a split decision about how to handle digital images out of the camera these days. One camp says the only way to shoot is raw format, and that you have to process the image yourself after exposure for ultimate quality. The other says that you can set up all the parameters you need in the camera and even if you shoot raw you don't need to do extensive image...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Apr 25, 2006 0 comments

Digital Image Sensor Update

The Promise of Even Better Image Quality Ahead

by George Schaub

All the talk in the past was about megapixels, with the horserace of ever-higher
counts grabbing all the headlines. Some folks claim that the latest 6 and 8
MP cameras deliver such good quality at such low price points that themegapixe...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2004 0 comments

While we plunge ahead into the digital world, and continue to buy cameras, printers, and scanners at record pace, there remain some issues that need resolution before everyone can feel comfortable with the digital thing. We do get letters, and your concerns are of paramount interest to us, that raise issues we have often addressed. But the tone of many letters express doubts about...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Nov 28, 2006 0 comments

Digital SLR Price Drops, with More to Come

by George Schaub

The recent announcement of the $599 D40 from Nikon (
is just the beginning of an anticipated flood of announcements from DSLR makers
about morereaso...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

The annual Photo Marketing Association (PMA) Show is the US market's introduction to new products and services that will be appearing on store shelves and, increasingly, Internet sales shops in 2005. Coming on the heels of last year's photokina, the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), and the hoard of other trade shows that litter the calendar of late, this, the...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jul 06, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 1 comments
While many cameras today have extensive on-board image processing, and offer numerous special effects and “retouch” functions, you are in fact relying on someone else’s opinion of how your images should look when you avail yourself of them. At Shutterbug we emphasize quality imaging, and part of attaining quality is taking control of your own images by getting involved in how they look and “feel” by taking them in hand and doing your own processing work.