George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 12, 2012 Published: May 01, 2012 0 comments
One of our feature stories this month, Jason Schneider’s “The Shape of (Digital) Things to Come,” got me thinking about just what might be ahead in the ever-changing world of photography. In the past few years we’ve seen pretty much variations on the theme, with every feature manufacturers can think of being added to digital cameras. We’ve seen GPS, more in-camera processing options, in-camera HDR and tone curve control, and of course the update of virtually every camera line to incorporate HD video. All of this is to the good, but only if it gets you where you need to go.
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George Schaub Posted: Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

It's 10PM: Do You Know Where Your Pixels Are?

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George Schaub Posted: May 31, 2014 Published: May 01, 2014 0 comments
Here at Shutterbug we strive to bring you a mix of product information and tests as well as the end result of using all that gear—great images by a diverse group of photographers. While some issues are more geared toward one side or the other, this one’s got a healthy helping of both.
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George Schaub Posted: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

Editor's Notes

Completing The Creative Circle

Photographic expression is more than snapping the shutter and "walking away" from the picture. The creative circle becomes complete, if you will, by the...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 24, 2014 0 comments
Tonality does not exist in a vacuum; the tones form a visual impression in terms of both their intrinsic value and their relationship to one another. The context in which they relate is called contrast, simply the difference and relationship between the light and dark values in the scene. Contrast determines the “look” of the image, and has a profound effect upon visual effects.
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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

The idea of loading an image and pushing a button and seeing what happens may be anathema to some photographers, but for certain images where you might want an extra-special touch done easy it might just do the trick.

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 30, 2007 0 comments

CS 3 Beta..Black and White Improvements and Changes

by George Schaub

I have always enjoyed black and white printing, and have used the tools in
various versions of Photoshop to go from color to black and white. Now, with
CS3 (beta) there are even more tools to work with, some of which are improvements
or at leastrefineme...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

Multimedia usually means a device that does a lot of things for you; experience shows that in such devices some are done better than others. We are seeing more and more multimedia coming to photography. Sony, for example, just announced a digicam that you can use to connect to the web, and not just an online storage server. Epson, HP, Canon, and other printer companies tout...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

According to the folks at Tribeca Imaging Laboratories (TIL), digital cameras (and I might add many types of film) "can't see purple." They go on to say, "The digital color model generates a limited spectrum. Any user can confirm this by simply pointing a camera at a deep blue or purple object and comparing the colors on the camera's LCD or computer...

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 04, 2005 0 comments

High scene contrast always creates difficulties for photographers, whether
shooting film or digital. The difficulty stems from the difference between the
ways the film or sensor "sees" and how the human eye sees. Our eyes
are adaptive, and can resolve large variations in brightness by the way it scans
throughout the scene and the amazing reflex of automatically restricting and
dilating the pupil to adjust to bright and dark areas before us. While light
metering systems in cameras are impressive in the way they can read light, the
fact remains that at the moment of exposure the lens on a camera records a scene
at one fixed aperture, or opening. In most situations this is no problem, as
the meter averages light values and the bright and dark areas are distributed
through the recording medium properly. But high contrast presents a problem.

A
better solution is to use the --1 contrast setting. This
allows for smoother tonal gradations and addresses the need to
control the divergent light values in this backlit scene.

All Photos © George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

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