George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2005 3 comments

All Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

I grew up with black and white. Color, for me, was a distraction, a pretty thing that was fine for stock and the family album, but the color of the photographic blood that ran through my veins was monochrome. I spent many a year in the darkroom, honing my black and white skills, and even paid the rent for a good many...

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 05, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 1 comments
The question is—does anybody really know what a given image would look like if they shot it on Kodachrome 25, or Fuji Acros, or some obscure color negative film that even in film’s heyday was little used or appreciated? Perhaps the more pertinent question is—how many people have made photographs using film? But film references are what a number of so-called film emulation software programs use for describing presets that can be applied to a digital image. Half academic and half nostalgic, the programs use film brand names to describe saturation, contrast, color nuance, and grain structure variations that are then applied to an image. Perhaps using film names is better than poetic fantasy terms, like “misty blue dawn,” but then again entirely subjective descriptors, rather than supposedly clinical ones used in these software programs, might be just as handy for today’s photography crowd. In any case, I recently tested one such program, DxO’s FilmPack 3.1, to see if it offered up creative variations that could be used as is or as foundation images when interpreting subjects and scenes.

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 24, 2014 0 comments
Photographs made from above the earth cannot help but stir the spirit and this book, including photographs by astronaut Chris Hadfield that were sourced from NASA and the CSA (government of Canada) are among the best that I have seen from high above “the Blue Marble” we call home. The images in this 192-page book are beautifully reproduced and cover everything from cities to geographical features to the swirls in our vast seas.
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George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2002 0 comments

Though many people imagine that they will get to build their own web site with their images, they may have hesitated because of the perceived difficulties involved. There's the daunting aspect of working in code, figuring out how to best prepare their images and perhaps confusion about how to...

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 07, 2005 0 comments

The digital darkroom has made it simple to accomplish print and image effects
that would have taken hours in the chemical darkroom environment. While the
learning curve can be steep (as it certainly was for the chemical darkroom,
at least if you wanted good results) the ease with which some tasks can be accomplished
is almost...well, embarrassing, at least to those who once labored in the
amber-lit confines of the darkroom.

...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

For those who worked in the confines of the amber-lit chemical darkroom and experienced the wonder of an image emerging from paper after being dipped in a tray of liquid, the changeover to the digital darkroom, as it has come to be known, has been radical. No longer dealing with dye and density, we are now confronted with changeable codes that are handled by graphic interfaces...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2003 0 comments

Editor's Notes

Photography is by definition "drawing with light" and that's what we do every time we press the shutter release button. We take the light reflected from our subjects and etch the moment as a latent image on film or as a binary code that lands up on our...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

Editor's Notes

As this issue is dedicated to digital photography I thought it would be a good time to share some thoughts on where we stand in the midst of this incredible change that has taken place in photography over the past 10 or so years. These days, it seems like if you support film...

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