George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Many moons ago I was granted a few test rolls of the then-new Fujichrome Velvia 50. I happened to be in Las Vegas at the time, and curious just how saturated this touted high-saturation film might be I hiked around red rock country and exposed a few rolls. Having been a dedicated slide shooter and film tester for another photo mag I was pretty familiar with slide films and how...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

I have a bunch of prints on the walls and desktops of my studio, and I almost can't believe my eyes. For years I have been stubbornly teaching that image resolution (in pixel dimensions) and physical print size were in lock step, and even scoffed at a camera maker for claiming that their 5-megapixel digicam could produce 20x24 prints. Make a good 13x19 from anything less...

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 01, 2009 0 comments

When I first worked with and reviewed Genuine Fractals back in 2006, I posited that it made the megapixel race moot in the way it allowed even small files to be used for big enlargements.

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 01, 2001 0 comments

Photographers have always been fascinated by super wide angle focal lengths. This focal length range, including 20mm, expands peripheral vision beyond the scope of human vision, and does so with a potential depth of field that makes...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Long the realm of commercial labs due to their cost and complexity, a new breed of large format printers are being aimed at photographers, both pro and advanced amateurs, who want to take control of their gallery, portrait, and wedding prints. New inks, simplified software, and vastly enhanced workflows make these printers attractive to photographers who make the commitment to...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 07, 2011 1 comments

Remote viewing and shutter release capability opens up a host of picture opportunities, from working high atop camera platforms from ground level to very low level shooting without muddying your clothes (given your camera lacks an articulating monitor) to placing your camera in spots and being able to view and shoot without your being right behind the viewfinder. Many photographers routinely work with radio triggers for flash, especially in studio environments where the lights are set in position and photographer and model or subject move. The Hahnel Inspire adds to the mix with remote shutter release and viewing in one.

Here in this Hahnel supplied illustration you get a good idea of the way the unit works, setting up a signal relationship for both remote viewing and shutter release.

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 15, 2011 Published: May 01, 2011 0 comments
Remote viewing and shutter release capability opens up a host of picture opportunities, from working high atop camera platforms from ground level to very low-level shooting without muddying your clothes (given your camera lacks an articulating monitor) to placing your camera in spots and being able to view and shoot without your being right behind the viewfinder. Many photographers routinely work with radio triggers for flash, especially in studio environments where the lights are set in position and photographer and model or subject move. The Hähnel Inspire adds to the mix with remote shutter release and viewing in one.
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George Schaub Posted: Sep 01, 2007 0 comments

The digital trend these days seems to be film and silver halide print emulation. Not long ago we reviewed Alien Skin's Exposure software, which had push-button manipulation of digital images to make them look just as if they had been exposed on certain types of film. DxO's FilmPack, subject of a future review, offers similar image "looks." And at a recent...

George Schaub Posted: Jul 26, 2011 2 comments
Is This the Best Leica Digital Yet?

Having owned a (used) Leica M3 since the late 1970’s I can attest to the charms of working with a Leica camera. There is a certain heft and solidity of construction that speaks to its obvious longevity, which is juxtaposed with a deftness of operation, characteristics on display in the M3 in the stroke of the film advance lever and the sound and feel of the shutter release. For those who have experienced a Leica, that “aha that’s why” moment is quite unmatched by other cameras and it spoils you, in a way. Yet, working with a Leica for me has always had a certain awkwardness—witness the film loading in the M3, at least when compared with a sleek Nikon or Canon of the day, and the rangefinder focusing system, almost arcane in the world of autofocusing speed and accuracy. Yet, that awkwardness is not a true impediment and almost becomes part of the charm.

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 11, 2013 0 comments
Calling a product “state-of-the-art” can be a double-edged sword, one that includes both the leading edge and the bleeding edge. In the case of the Samsung EX2F there’s more of the leading side of the equation, at least when it come to a fun, portable camera that delivers in more ways than one—especially when it comes to connecting you from camera to email, sharing sites, et al.

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