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George Schaub Posted: May 22, 2012 0 comments
Think of the image you capture with a digital camera as a digital negative and that you are a master printer who can take that negative and make as good a print as you have ever seen in a gallery and you begin to understand the potential of each shot. The expectation that you can do something more with an image can be built into every type of lighting condition, contrast and exposure problem you might face. It is not that you can “fix it” in software, it is that you should think beyond the exposure to what can be done to the image later, right at the moment you make the photograph. This approach can open you up to many other possibilities and make you take chances when you work; it can also raise expectations of what you have obtained beyond what you see on the playback right after the shot.
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Ron Leach Posted: May 21, 2012 1 comments
There’s a little company in Tuscon, Arizona that is literally working on some giant ideas—like a digital camera with so much dynamic range it can capture both the sun and the stars in broad daylight!

Spectral Instruments has built a 20-year reputation as a premier provider of cooled, high-end CCD-based camera systems for scientific imaging applications from astronomy to pre-clinical drug discovery. This new project, the “1110 Series,” involves a camera with a 112-megapixel, black-and-white sensor without a Bayer mask or filter of any type that could “detract from the overall image sharpness.”

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George Schaub Posted: May 15, 2012 10 comments
Here are some suggestions for self-assignments that can aid you in getting a good handle on mastering your camera. Give each technique a full day then review the images, along with the EXIF data. As you complete these self-assignments you’ll start to make great photos every time you pick up the camera.
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Steve Bedell Posted: May 15, 2012 0 comments
Sometimes we forget about all the factors that go into lighting a portrait. We might focus on the direction of that beautiful window light, the color of the fleeting sunset, the dim light in a church or that wall of light created by sun light bouncing off a building. Gaining skill in lighting means taking all four factors into consideration with each photo you take.
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Staff Posted: Apr 12, 2012 Published: May 01, 2012 0 comments
On The Cover
This month’s issue continues our report of the new products of 2012 based on our coverage of the annual CES/PMA trade show. In this issue we cover new tripods, bags, lenses, and lighting. We also have an in-depth report on new tech that is beginning to revolutionize how we capture images, as well as Image Tech reports on the Sony A65 and Fujifilm X10. Plus there are some new photo stamps coming, this set honoring aerial photography, that we trust all of you who still send letters will use!

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Ron Leach Posted: Apr 16, 2012 0 comments
Jack Robinson was a prominent American photographer throughout the 1950s and 1960s when his career was cut short by a drinking problem and he faded into obscurity—until a former boss visited Robinson’s apartment and discovered a veritable treasure trove of iconic images.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 12, 2012 3 comments
Photographers are always concerned that their pictures turn out as sharp as possible. Photography has a seemingly endless number of challenges, but sharpness is number one. No matter how incredible your photo opportunity is, if the images are not sharp, nothing else matters. The pictures will be worthless. Too often images are almost sharp, and this is particularly vexing because if only you had paid attention to one tiny detail or two, they would be perfect.
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Lindsay Adler Posted: Apr 12, 2012 0 comments
If you have a window with thick or dark curtains, then you have the recipe for stunning dramatic lighting. You don’t need any special equipment—just your camera, the window, and curtains. This light is great for men and women, and can emphasize the mood and the form of your subject.

Natural light is stunning and is a great way to get an intimate portrait of your subject. You do not have the distraction of bright flashing strobes of the studio or having to make large modifications to natural light using diffusers or reflectors. Instead, window light helps you keep it simple, and allows you to connect with your subject more easily and keep the mood relaxed.

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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Apr 12, 2012 1 comments
The computer needs of a digital photographer are different from someone who just wants to check e-mail and surf the Web. In this article, I’ll take a look at some of the features you should look for when considering a new computer. You can look at these suggestions as being divided into two categories: Essentials and Options. Essentials will provide the basic needs for the advanced amateur—not the pro—while Options covers those who use their camera to record video and their computer to edit it.
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Staff Posted: Mar 16, 2012 Published: Apr 01, 2012 0 comments
On The Cover
This month’s issue features the work of a number of photographers who have created their own personal projects and applied great energy, effort, and skill to them. The owl photo is by David FitzSimmons from his Curious Critters book. We also kick off our US trade show coverage this month by highlighting the battle of the D-SLR titans and their new flagship cameras, plus continue our Image Tech series with a lab review of two fascinating mirrorless cameras.

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Ron Leach Posted: Mar 19, 2012 0 comments
The Future of Photography Museum Amsterdam (FOAM) recently celebrated its 10th anniversary with an exhibit and series of activities reflecting upon the future of our craft. The organization’s mission is to enable people throughout the world to experience and enjoy photography—whether it's at their museum in Amsterdam, on their website (www.foam.org), or via their internationally distributed magazine.
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Chuck Gloman Posted: Mar 15, 2012 0 comments
When shooting portraits, just setting the color balance on Automatic or one of the Temperature “modes” is not the most efficient way of capturing natural skins tones. Instead, take a manual white balance reading of your subject in the environment and then make adjustments from there.

With all of the portraits I shoot, there are a few constants: low ISO (200–400), mid range f/stop for more lens clarity (f/5.6–f/9), telephoto lens for narrow depth of field (70–120mm) and the sharpest part of the image being the subjects’s eyes. The last “given” when I shoot is to always capture the image in Raw—knowing I can easily manipulate it in editing if needed.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Mar 15, 2012 1 comments
We don’t normally speak of soft drinks and flowers in the same sentence, but there is a very cool technique that brings these two unlikely subjects together. Actually, you can use any kind of seltzer water or flavored water that is carbonated. Put the carbonated clear liquid in a glass or plastic container with clear and flat sides, and when you submerge the flowers in the liquid the bubbles cling to the petals. This is a unique subject matter for macro work, and with dramatic lighting the results can be quite beautiful.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Mar 15, 2012 0 comments
I’m sure you have been intrigued by the rainbow colors you can see in CDs and DVDs. As a visual person, it’s hard not to be attracted to these intense, supersaturated colors. I’ve tried to photograph them but was never happy with the results until I experimented with placing drops of water on the surface of the disc. That changed everything. The colors of the CD combined with the defined shapes of the drops in amazing ways, and this was even more captivating than just seeing color in the disc.
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Staff Posted: Feb 21, 2012 Published: Mar 01, 2012 0 comments
On The Cover
In this month’s issue we cover wedding and portrait topics, including tips on lighting, posing, and gear. We also have bonus lighting gear tests, as well as a look at a new Canon 13” printer and a test of a new breed of a Nikon interchangeable lens camera, the 1 series. We also have a new series of camera lab tests, Image Tech, starting with the Olympus E-PL3. Look for more Image Tech reviews to come in future issues.

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