Newsletter

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Ron Leach Posted: Feb 20, 2013 0 comments
While we usually devote this column to discussing trends in camera technology, every so often our industry does something special that’s worth a nod—in this case, a program to provide free portraits to the families of those currently serving in the U.S. military. Dubbed “Portraits of Love,” this project was developed by the PhotoImaging Manufacturers and Distributors Association (PMDA) and will be showcased at the upcoming Big Photo Show in Los Angeles.
Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Feb 15, 2013 0 comments
Photographing geometric light trails is so much easier than it was with film in the past because now I can tweak the results based on the immediate feedback on the LCD monitor of the camera.
Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Feb 15, 2013 0 comments
A vocabulary word I still remember from high school chemistry is immiscible. This refers to the fact that some liquids can’t mix together to form a homogenous solution. Oil and water are an example. When oil is mixed with water, no matter how long you stir, they will never blend together to become one liquid.
Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Feb 15, 2013 0 comments
You can create remarkable multicolored and monochromatic abstracts by dropping individual drops of food coloring in to water. The way the color mixes with the water is endlessly fascinating, constantly changing, and it produces images that are worthy of being framed.
Filed under
Staff Posted: Jan 22, 2013 Published: Feb 01, 2013 0 comments
On The Cover
This issue features the work of a number of photographers who have dedicated their time and energy to a personal project that we are happy to share with you. We also have continuing coverage of the photokina show, with reporting on new tripods and heads and camera bags and carriers, as well as a very special report on the state of stock photography today. We also have lab reports on two exciting new cameras, the Samsung NX20 and the Panasonic G5.
Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jan 22, 2013 0 comments
It is disappointing when you travel somewhere hoping for beautiful weather, and instead of sunrise and sunset lighting, beautiful cloud formations, and comfortable temperatures, you face a rainstorm, a dull sky, or even a blizzard. While the pictures that you had in mind may not be possible, there are always great photographs that can be taken. It’s just a matter of expanding your thinking.
Filed under
Ron Leach Posted: Jan 22, 2013 9 comments
We spent a full week in Las Vegas earlier this month exploring the crowded halls of the 2013 Consumer Electronics Show, but it only took about an hour to confirm that the long-discussed convergence of mobile phones, tablets and camera technology is no longer a theoretical topic for discussion; it is a full-fledged reality. As you might expect, iPhone/iPad accessories targeted at the general consumer abounded, but there was also a wide array of innovative technology for the advanced photographer as well.
Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jan 22, 2013 0 comments
I live in Tennessee, and in this part of the country it doesn’t get cold enough in autumn to see colorful leaves frozen in local rivers. When I first moved here, I had been hoping to get shots like that, and I was disappointed that it wasn’t going to happen. I came up with an idea to get the shots I wanted, though, and it worked out quite well. I was able to create artistic and colorful macro shots in which I had total control as opposed to finding beautiful patterns serendipitously.
Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jan 22, 2013 1 comments
One of the more interesting projects I’ve explored in photography is shooting birefringent crystals. Birefringence is the splitting of a light ray by a crystal into two components that are at different velocities and are polarized at right angles to each other. What this means in terms of photography is that when light passes through the crystals, you can see rainbow colors in the unique and beautiful forms that make up the crystal.
Filed under
Staff Posted: Dec 11, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2013 0 comments
On The Cover
This month’s issue features the first in our series of reports from photokina, the worldwide imaging show, and features the new cameras of 2013. We’re also thrilled to bring you portfolios from Al Satterwhite, Michael Somoroff, Craig Blacklock, and Daryl and Justin Hawk, as well as a self-publishing saga by Jim Lynch and J. David Gray. Plus we have a lab test and pro essay on the exciting Nikon D4.

Filed under
Ron Leach Posted: Dec 18, 2012 1 comments
Earlier this month a national debate ensued after a freelance photographer captured the image of a man just before a New York subway train fatally struck him after he was pushed onto the tracks. The controversial photograph was subsequently published on the cover of the NY Post under the gruesome headline “DOOMED.”
Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Dec 11, 2012 0 comments
The ultra intense colors emitted from phosphorescent paint under a blacklight grab everyone’s attention. These colors exist nowhere in nature and any photographer who loves to think outside the box should experiment with the amazing possibilities this technique affords.
Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Dec 11, 2012 0 comments
If this were a perfect world, ice cream would be good for you, celery would be fattening, and camera manufacturers would arrange the controls on all flash units in the same place. It’s too bad on all accounts.

Even though portable flash units have buttons and dials in different places, the basic functions of the various features are the same. In this section, I will go over them and explain when to use them. You will probably need to consult the manual that came with your flash to identify where the features I discuss reside on your unit. Whenever you travel away from home, it’s a good idea to have this manual with you because if you don’t use a function for a while, it’s easy to forget where it is and how to use it.

Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Dec 11, 2012 3 comments
Architecture is one of the subjects photographers love to shoot at home and abroad. Even if your passion is shooting landscapes or people, it’s hard not to get excited by a stunning work of architecture such as the B’hai temple in New Delhi or the twin towers in Kuala Lumpur. From impressive city skylines like New York and Philadelphia to a Navajo Hogan in Monument Valley, and from the interior of a Buddhist temple in Thailand to a Bavarian castle in Germany, architecture is awe inspiring. It is art in the form of stone, steel, wood, and glass. It is often a glimpse into our past, and it is so varied throughout the world that it is endlessly intriguing.
Filed under
Staff Posted: Nov 18, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2012 0 comments
On The Cover
In this issue we present lab and field tests on a variety of digital cameras, including the Nikon D800, Pentax K-01, Sony A57 SLT, Olympus OM-D, and Canon Rebel T4i. We also have studio tests of two light modifiers, plus a fascinating look at some user collectible panoramic cameras. And, be sure to read this month’s Business Trends feature on marketing your images!

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading