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Newsletter
Peter K. Burian Jun 07, 2005 0 comments

Until recently, few digital camera owners were able to make true wide angle
images because a 38mm focal length was the shortest available in built-in zooms.
(All focal lengths are discussed in 35mm format equivalent.) Today, an increasing
number of digicams include zooms that start at 28mm or even 24mm. Many of the
high-end cameras also accept 0.7x adapters, ideal for ultra wide angle photography.
And SLR system lens manufacturers have also started making incredibly short
zooms, such as 12-24mm, for a very wide angle of view. All of this is great
news for creative shooters who want to expand their visual horizons.


Most camera owners think of a wide angle lens as something that's
useful for including an entire landscape vista, street scene,
or a large group of people, in a single image. While that is one
valid reason for owning a wide angle lens, or a wide angle adapter
accessory, there are many others as discussed in the text. (28mm
equivalent.) Photo © 2005 Peter K. Burian.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Apr 19, 2005 0 comments

When shooting film, especially slide film, color rendition is a matter of
matching the film's "personality" with the subject at hand.
You can choose films with high or "normal" color saturation, contrast
and color response. These two photos of a colorful Christmas toy soldier in
New York's Rockefeller Center show the differences between saturation
renditions. With a digital camera you can program in color saturation, "warmth"
and even color contrast, making every frame you shoot like an individual selection
of film.


Color Low Saturation

 


Color High Saturation Warm

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Newsletter
George Schaub Dec 21, 2004 0 comments

There are many ways to work with monochrome images, including selective adjustment
of tonal values, contrast and even image color that can emulate toning. In this
installment of our Web How To's we'll play with colorization, adding
color to selective parts of a monochrome image that can make it look like a
combination hand-painted (with photo oils) and toned photograph. You can paint
in selectively with brush tools if you like, but this how-to deals with a more
simplified approach.

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Newsletter
Howard Millard Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

Could your portraits be enhanced
by the mysterious, otherworldly glow of a black and white infrared (IR) effect?
In the past, pre-digital darkroom, the only way you could get the IR look was
shooting special IR film, quite a challenge to expose, process, and print correctly.
Working digitally you can avoid many of the pitfalls and gain much more control
in the bargain. Here's how to emulate that exotic infrared look digitally:




You can start with a scan of any color slide, print, or negative you've
shot with your film camera or, even easier, with a color file from your digital
camera. If you're starting with a print, negative, or slide, scan it in
RGB color mode. Once you've got the digital file, open it in Adobe Photoshop
CS (or some earlier versions) to follow the steps outlined here. You can also
achieve the effect with Adobe Elements 2 or other advanced image-editing programs,
but the names of some tools or dialog boxes may be slightly different. Always
work on a copy to preserve your original scan. In fact, with this technique,
it is a good idea to make two or three copies in order to try different settings
in search of the effect you like best. Just follow these steps and you'll
be on your way to easy IR.

1.
I began with this original color file shot in Raw mode with a
Canon Digital Rebel 6-megapixel digital SLR with a Canon 18-55mm
lens at 55mm (equivalent to a 90mm lens in 35mm format). File
size: 18MB. (Model: Riley Messina.)

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Newsletter
Howard Millard Jul 26, 2005 0 comments

1.

It was the swinging `60s,
I was in college, and many wore a rainbow of tie-dyed colors. What had
been "normal" was being challenged on every front, and that
included photography. The bulging, startling perspective of the fisheye
lens added an otherworldly look to album covers for rock musicians like
Jimi Hendrix and Cream. Now, decades later, just as bell bottom pants
recently returned for yet another cycle, fisheye images have again reared
their heads in both print and television ads. A fisheye lens, of course,
is one that takes in an extremely wide angle of view, often 180º,
and appears as a circle within the black image frame. Yes, there are rectilinear
full frame fisheyes (which give a rectangular, not round image), but to
my mind, they're merely ultra-wide angle lenses. A true fisheye,
on the other hand, is a unique special effects tool which renders a unique
circular perspective of the world.



When I was a student, fisheye lenses cost a small fortune (some still
do). What to do? I drilled a hole in the center of a lens cap and glued
a brass door peephole from a hardware store to it. Snapping the lens cap/fisheye
lens over a 50mm or wider angle standard lens, I got a small 180º
circular fisheye image in the center of the black frame. Quality was not
great, but the effect was spectacular.

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Newsletter
Peter K. Burian May 24, 2005 0 comments

As recently as 18 months ago, a built-in image stabilizer was a rarity in digital
cameras. It was available only in a couple of Panasonic models and one Konica
Minolta DiMAGE camera. Today, an increasing number of digicams -- from four
manufacturers -- employ some form of camera shake compensating device. And there's
even a digital SLR with a built-in Anti-Shake mechanism, the Maxxum 7D. We expect
this trend to continue with other manufacturers jumping on the bandwagon. "Sounds
great if you're into high-tech gizmos," you may be thinking, "but
is this feature really necessary?"

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Newsletter
Howard Millard Sep 27, 2005 0 comments


1

Photos © 2003, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

Adding a reflection of your
subject can double the impact of your digital photo, transforming an
ordinary shot into something memorable and striking. Using tools in
Adobe Photoshop, Elements, and other image-editing programs, it's
not too difficult to double your pixel power. Just follow these nine
steps. I used Photoshop, and the procedure is similar in Elements or
other programs.



2

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Newsletter
George Schaub Jun 21, 2005 0 comments

Now I know how stagecoach drivers felt when they saw those first rail lines
being laid over their routes. The recent announcement that Kodak would be discontinuing
their silver black and white papers didn't come as much as a shock as
an inevitability that one always hopes will not be manifest. With inventories
expected to last a few months, we're now witnessing the disappearance
of venerable brands such as Polycontrast IV, Azo and Polymax Fine Art, Kodabrome
II and Portra, even their "Digital Black and White" paper, which
was used for digital printers. According to a Kodak spokesperson, Kodak has
seen a cumulative drop in black and white paper buying of 25% per year over
the past few years and could no longer justify being in the market. We also
learned, by the way, that Kodak black and white papers had of late been produced
in Brazil, being packaged from rolls in Rochester. The spokesperson did stress,
however, that Kodak black and white film and chemistry was not on the chopping
block and that Kodak sees silver photography as still extremely viable.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

There are times when we have images that are too dark or too light and often
reject them out of hand. But the values only need to be adjusted to bring what
might have sat in shadow into the light. We can do that selectively with certain
tonal areas in the print or globally--that is, on the entire image. This
web how-to covers revealing what might sit in the shadows and deals with a very
simple global adjustment. The work is done here in Photoshop, but many other
image manipulation programs have similar controls.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Feb 15, 2005 0 comments

Handcolorists have been doing it for years. They began with a black and white
image and using photo oils, chiefly from the Marshall Company (distributed by
BKA Group) added selective color or entirely covered a monochrome image with
color. This was often practiced with portraits, but began to find followers
in the "fine arts" arena as well. We've seen this so-called
mixed-media trend come and go, and I don't think hand-coloring will ever
go out of style. Digital has opened up many new doors for creativity, and because
you can manipulate images with ease it allows you to emulate any look, style
or technique that you might admire. In this lesson we'll take a look at
"colorizing" an image and mixing color with black and white.

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Newsletter
Jack Warren Jan 18, 2005 0 comments

Every Friday high profile photographers come to the microphones of wsRadio.com
the world wide leader in Internet talk, the best, brightest and high profile
photographers in the world for your listening pleasure.


We are approaching three years of Internet Radio broadcasting. What makes this
show different from other radio shows is that it originates and is stored on
the web at www.shutterbugradio.com
or www.wsradio.com/shutterbug.
The content of the show is all photography talk, all the time. If you missed
hearing something important, you can go back and replay it again and again.
If you're a photo enthusiast you'll love to here high profile photographers
share their exciting experiences while giving hints and tips on how they get
the job done. Find out what kind of equipment they use and what they recommend.



You will also hear industry leaders make important major announcements that
will affect your photography. You will find out about major trade shows in the
industry.



What does it feel like flying in the chase plane of space Ship One, photographing
one of the historical events of your lifetime. How do you hold your breath when
the horses of the Kentucky Derby are coming around the final turn and you alone
are responsible to record this spectacular moment? Do you know what kind of
camera Oscar nominated Jeff Bridges prefers? Do you know how many photographers
cover the Indy 500? What is it like being a photographer in the NFL? You just
have to listen to this outstanding broadcast each week and hear the voices of
these very talented photographers.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Jul 26, 2005 0 comments

If you have Photoshop Elements or the full version of Photoshop
you can also use a tool called "Save for Web" to resize your images.
(Note that other programs might also have this feature under a different name.)
This is an automated way to get your images the right size for sharing. To get
to this toolbox just go to File>Save for Web, with the image already open
on your desktop.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Jun 07, 2005 0 comments

The digital darkroom has made it simple to accomplish print and image effects
that would have taken hours in the chemical darkroom environment. While the
learning curve can be steep (as it certainly was for the chemical darkroom,
at least if you wanted good results) the ease with which some tasks can be accomplished
is almost...well, embarrassing, at least to those who once labored in the
amber-lit confines of the darkroom.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Nov 22, 2004 0 comments



Remember the shoebox, the place where all those snapshots were stored? It was
a great tradition to take a roll of film, share it with family and friends and
then dutifully deposit the pictures and negatives into a cardboard container that
would be stocked away on some closet shelf. Well, digital photography hasn't
changed that great tradition, but nowadays the "shoebox" is more likely
filled with CDs or DVDs that hold the pictures--only to be stacked away in that
same closet next to that snapshot shoebox.

Newsletter
Howard Millard Sep 27, 2005 0 comments


To
achieve the eerie, glowing effect of infrared black and
white film, I applied several techniques in Adobe Photoshop.

Photos © 2001, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

Are you attracted to the
mysterious, otherworldly glow of black and white infrared film? But
you've heard that it's a bit of a hassle to shoot and print.
Well, here's how to emulate that exotic infrared (IR) look digitally
starting with any color original.



Why not shoot IR film to begin with? Kodak High Speed Infrared film
is a challenge. First, to avoid fogging, it should be stored in the
refrigerator and must be loaded and unloaded in the darkroom or a changing
bag. Then, for the best effect, you must shoot with a deep red or opaque
filter over your lens. Once you've focused, you must re-focus
the lens manually to the infrared focus point. Since your camera meter
doesn't measure IR light, it's advisable to bracket exposures
widely. In the field, you must load and reload your camera in a light-tight
changing bag. After the film has been processed, the negatives are extremely
contrasty and often require extensive dodging and burning to get a good
print.



I
started with this original color 35mm slide shot on Fuji Sensia
II and scanned it on a Polaroid Sprintscan 35 Plus scanner
at 2700dpi for a 26MB file.

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