Pro Techniques

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

Photography can do two things that no other artistic medium can do: It can freeze motion so we are able to examine every detail in a fast-moving subject, thus revealing things that our eyes could never catch; and it can blur the same subject to express the fluidity and aesthetics of motion. When you blur a subject with a long enough shutter speed, it blends the background with a...

Filed under
Jay Abend Posted: Oct 01, 2003 0 comments

As a pro photographer I get a lot of questions about my work. While many address my equipment and techniques, a lot of people want to know what I earn. There is no question more loaded than "How much do you make?" (Perhaps except...

Susan McCartney Posted: Aug 01, 2002 0 comments

My niece and keen amateur photographer Elizabeth Martin celebrated the coming of the new millennium on a mountainside near Katmandu, Nepal. She carried a backpack containing a Canon EOS Elan, 20 rolls of color print film, three pairs of wool socks, her...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Dec 01, 1999 0 comments

Lindsay Silverman
Marketing Manager, SLR Program Development
Nikon Inc.

Flexible Flyer. "Don't be married to one method of shooting. Even though the cameras I use can be customized, I...

Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jun 20, 2014 0 comments
One of the first techniques I learned in photography was to use long exposures at night to blur traffic lights. I liked it decades ago, and I still enjoy seeing artful streaks of light superimposed over an urban environment. You never know exactly what the resulting images will look like, and that’s part of the fun. When the background happens to striking, like the Walt Disney Theater in Los Angeles, California (#1), the combination of abstract lights and architecture makes a winning photograph.
Lou Jacobs Jr. Posted: Aug 23, 2014 0 comments

When Yiming Hu was a freshman in college he rented a camera and fell in love with photography. After he moved from China to the United States he was drawn to landscape and travel photography and learned advanced photo techniques from books, magazines, the Internet, and lots of experience. Today he works as a computer engineering professor at the University of Cincinnati doing research, and as a second career he shoots landscapes and travel subjects in many locations to satisfy his photo appetite. I spoke with him recently about his work.

Rick Sammon Posted: Aug 01, 2001 0 comments

It's that time of year when many of us are gearing up for our summer vacations. Some folks will go to the far sides of the planet, others will stay close to home. But, no matter where we go, Shutterbug readers have one thing in common:...

Peter K. Burian Posted: May 01, 2001 0 comments

Whenever I judge photo contests including a travel category, one fact quickly becomes apparent: picture-taking during vacation and other trips is not always taken seriously. The photographer who might spend hours making an exceptional landscape...

Filed under
Tim Verthein Posted: Nov 01, 2009 0 comments

Hopefully you haven’t thrown out your old TLR. I don’t mean your Yashica-Mat, or your Minolta Autocord, or even your Mamiya C330.

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 01, 2002 0 comments

We had a theory that somewhere
in the career of many a pro photographer there's one photograph that marks
a turning point. It might be the one that brings the first recognition
or first sale; or the one with which she proves to herself that, yes...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 15, 2013 Published: Oct 01, 2013 0 comments
Arthur Meyerson is an award-winning commercial, editorial, and fine art photographer celebrated for his control of composition and command of light and color. In 2012 he published The Color of Light, a collection of iconic, classic images that included this photograph.
Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 14, 2014 Published: Jan 01, 2014 0 comments
Currently a lecturer, teacher, and writer, Sam Abell’s celebrated career includes positions as a contract and staff photographer and photographer-in-residence at National Geographic magazine. This 1959 photo of his father at the Painesville, Ohio, train station is the homepage image of his website, samabell-thephotographiclife.com.
Filed under
Howard Millard Posted: Sep 01, 2006 0 comments

Color can thrill, color can dazzle, but often a black and white or monochrome image is more powerful. Black and white may better convey the feeling you want to evoke for a particular image--more dramatic, more abstract. Paradoxically, even when you know that you want a final photo in black and white, you should shoot digitally in color, as you should scan a film or print...

Filed under
Jay Miller Posted: Aug 04, 2011 Published: Jun 01, 2011 1 comments
Photographing airplanes and other flying machines is not something one routinely finds on a list of preferred occupations. It is in fact one of the more esoteric slices of the professional photographer’s pie. Not surprisingly, aviation photography is a demanding and potentially dangerous occupation. It requires a high level of arcane expertise in a very specialized subject area. Understandably, there is little room for error. Hanging out of flying machines with a camera in your hands is not a run-of-the-mill photo assignment.
Filed under
Howard Millard Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

You can use your flat-bed scanner as a camera to give a special look to small objects such as jewelry, rocks, bones, insects, plants, and flowers.

Pages