Pro Techniques

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: May 01, 2007 0 comments

Water. Even a small amount can turn your favorite camera into a worthless, grisly paperweight.

If your camera gear gets in the drink, there's only a slim chance you can save it. But you can improve your odds if you follow these tips.

Act Fast
If your camera gets wet, it's important to act quickly. If you're outdoors...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

Imagine living on a beautiful island: Look to your left and see the sun rise in the morning; look to your right and see it set each night.

The secret nuances of color on the horizon where the sky meets the sea and the sea meets the shore have drawn photographer Alison Shaw to Martha's Vineyard off the coast of New England, where she has lived and photographed for...

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Mar 01, 2010 0 comments

There are plenty of reasons to eschew perfect sharpness. A classic application was to suppress lines and wrinkles, or just for a light, airy mood: as Tallulah Bankhead once said, “They used to photograph Shirley Temple through gauze. They should photograph me through linoleum.” Another reason is to create the sense of something half-remembered, imperfectly limned in the picture as in...

Maynard Switzer Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

Ten years ago, when I was primarily a fashion photographer, I did a shoot in Cuba. Normally I’d have used medium and long telephoto lenses, but because the narrow streets I was shooting on featured colorfully painted walls, I switched to a 35mm lens. With that lens I was able to show not only the models but also the background, which revealed a bit about the location. Equally important, I...

Jay McCabe Posted: Jun 12, 2014 Published: Apr 01, 2014 0 comments
To photograph the wild horses of the Outer Banks of North Carolina you have to deal with the fact that they are indeed wild and thus not particularly welcoming of a photographer’s attention.
But first you have to deal with the Outer Banks, a 200-mile stretch of barrier islands off the coast of North Carolina. “It’s important to have an awareness of time, tide, and weather,” Lisa Cueman says of the location. “You can get into your photography, but not so much that you lose a sense of your surroundings.”
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Rosalind Smith Posted: Mar 01, 1999 0 comments

If you ask Grace Hopkins-Lisle
where the greatest influence on her photography lies, she will probably
answer, "right here"--here being a small, odd-shaped, cement
house set pretty among trees at the end ofa...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: May 01, 1999 0 comments

Christine Triebert was looking
for a different way to photograph the landscape, an alternative process
that would be more subjective in nature, more abstract. She wanted to
continue working in silver since it would give...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Feb 01, 1999 3 comments

When Claire Yaffa showed
her photographs to Cornell Capa, he said, "You take pretty pictures,
Yaffa, but what do you really want to say?" Yaffa thought long
and hard about the question. She had always beenin...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Jul 01, 1999 0 comments

"Your camera is like
a Geiger counter. It takes you to the right place. When it faces something
that doesn't interest you, there is no tick-ticking, but when
it faces something you like, it is tickingaway....

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Jun 01, 1999 0 comments

Marnie Crawford Samuelson
recalls one of her earliest influences, the photographer Sam Abell,
telling about a body of work he did on canoeing. His bosses were not
enthusiastic about the project initially but Abell hadst...

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Joe Farace Posted: Sep 01, 2005 0 comments

My favorite scene in the film Lawrence of Arabia is when Peter O'Toole, as Lawrence, looks out onto the desert landscape and watches a rider riding slowly toward him. It turns out to be Omar Sharif but the encounter is made more dramatic by the widescreen format.

There are a lot of ways to make panoramic images, including cropping standard...

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Rick Sammon Posted: Aug 01, 2002 0 comments

I'll never use a zoom lens." That's what some of my professional photographer friends said when I first got into photography back in the mid-70s. Back then, zoom lenses did not compare in sharpness to fixed focal length lenses. What's more, the zoom...

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