Pro Techniques

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Jan 01, 2010 1 comments

We have all had the experience of looking at old photographs that transport us back to a different age, whether it is 20 years ago, or 120. It can be very tempting to try to recreate a vintage look, whether for a particular emotional effect or simply because we can. But what are the actual differences, and how can we recreate them?

There are at least 10 answers or groups of answers...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jul 21, 2014 1 comments
Photography gives us the ability to freeze moments in time that are impossible for the human eye to see. The collision of a drop of water with a pool of water is an event that is intriguing to see, and without the aid of a camera and flash it would be impossible to study, appreciate and admire.
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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Jul 01, 2010 0 comments

The web has opened the door to many business opportunities for photographers that never existed before, one being the ability to sell photos via websites that specialize in marketing “stock” photography. Stock photography finds its way into a multitude of fields, including publishing, advertising, business presentations, and web design.

The stock industry has changed...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2010 0 comments

It’s pretty easy these days to do what seemed a monumental task in the past—create a website that makes navigation easy, displaying and selling images simple, and that does not require eight-weeks attendance in an HTML class in some bleak basement classroom of an adult ed evening program to get to stage one. True, there are plenty of browser and editing programs that can create a web...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2008 9 comments

Google “photographer” and you get, as of this writing, about 140 million (!) possible URLs; do the same for “photographer web pages” and you get over 25 million! The motivation for creating a web page with your photographs is legion: it can be used to display your work to a worldwide audience; showcase work to potential clients; license images for sale in publications and...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 03, 2012 Published: Mar 01, 2012 1 comments
Andy Marcus and son Brian are second- and third-generation portrait and wedding photographers. Their New York City studio, Fred Marcus Photography & Videography (www.fredmarcus.com), continues a tradition of dedicated service established by Fred Marcus back in 1941. “Back then my dad would use a 5x7 view camera for studio work and could be seen shooting portraits in bridal salons in the prestigious Bergdorf Goodman and Saks Fifth Avenue, among other venues,” Andy recalls. “When he shot weddings, he’d bring a Speed Graphic to the event—and flashbulbs.”
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Steve Bedell Posted: Apr 01, 2010 0 comments

If you are a wedding photographer, you already know what I’m about to tell you. The advent of inexpensive digital cameras that can produce amazingly good photos has shaken up the wedding market. With that and other matters in mind, I interviewed four of the top wedding photographers in the US and asked them some hard questions about where the wedding market might be headed. Our top shooters...

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Lorraine A. DarConte Posted: Apr 01, 2010 10 comments

There was a time when all wedding photography was pretty much the same. Well-trained photographers worked from “shot lists” and used high-end, medium format equipment. They took wedding portraits (many in-studio) whose hallmarks included great color, sharp details, beautiful lighting, and well-posed subjects. Wedding albums were filled with 8x10”, 8x8”, and 5x7”...

Wes Kroninger Posted: Apr 27, 2012 Published: Mar 01, 2012 4 comments
In his new book, Wes Kroninger’s Lighting (ISBN: 978-1-608952-54-0, Amherst Media, $34.95 US), the author and photographer draws on his experience as a portrait, commercial, and editorial photographer to present strategies that will help photographers bring out the beauty and character in all of their subjects—from kids, to businessmen, to fashion models.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

My friend wanted to begin shooting digital images of small objects for his company’s website, so he asked me to get him a deal on an expensive, full-frame D-SLR. The images were to be used primarily online at low resolution, and occasionally in an HTML e-mail newsletter. They were using a professional photographer to shoot the artwork for brochures, packaging, and their trade show booth.

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: May 01, 2007 1 comments

Water. Even a small amount can turn your favorite camera into a worthless, grisly paperweight.

If your camera gear gets in the drink, there's only a slim chance you can save it. But you can improve your odds if you follow these tips.

Act Fast
If your camera gets wet, it's important to act quickly. If you're outdoors...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

Imagine living on a beautiful island: Look to your left and see the sun rise in the morning; look to your right and see it set each night.

The secret nuances of color on the horizon where the sky meets the sea and the sea meets the shore have drawn photographer Alison Shaw to Martha's Vineyard off the coast of New England, where she has lived and photographed for...

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Mar 01, 2010 0 comments

There are plenty of reasons to eschew perfect sharpness. A classic application was to suppress lines and wrinkles, or just for a light, airy mood: as Tallulah Bankhead once said, “They used to photograph Shirley Temple through gauze. They should photograph me through linoleum.” Another reason is to create the sense of something half-remembered, imperfectly limned in the picture as in...

Maynard Switzer Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

Ten years ago, when I was primarily a fashion photographer, I did a shoot in Cuba. Normally I’d have used medium and long telephoto lenses, but because the narrow streets I was shooting on featured colorfully painted walls, I switched to a 35mm lens. With that lens I was able to show not only the models but also the background, which revealed a bit about the location. Equally important, I...

Jay McCabe Posted: Jun 12, 2014 Published: Apr 01, 2014 0 comments
To photograph the wild horses of the Outer Banks of North Carolina you have to deal with the fact that they are indeed wild and thus not particularly welcoming of a photographer’s attention.
But first you have to deal with the Outer Banks, a 200-mile stretch of barrier islands off the coast of North Carolina. “It’s important to have an awareness of time, tide, and weather,” Lisa Cueman says of the location. “You can get into your photography, but not so much that you lose a sense of your surroundings.”

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