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Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Oct 14, 2016 0 comments

There is no better time to look back at the work of Ansel Adams than this year’s 100th anniversary of the U.S. National Park Service. Adams was deeply committed to preserving the wilderness, and his black-and-white photographs of the West became one of the most important records of what many of the national parks were like before tourism greatly expanded.

Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Apr 01, 2016 0 comments

To say that Art Wolfe is not your typical portrait photographer is quite the understatement. With a career spanning 40 years, Wolfe brings his travels from every corner of the earth to create stunning portraits in his Human Canvas collection, honoring the traditions of Ethiopian tribal culture.

Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Mar 01, 2016 0 comments

She’s been shot at, bombed, kidnapped, groped, and severely injured in a car accident. But when the call comes with an assignment to a dangerous part of the world, documentary photographer Lynsey Addario rarely says no.

Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Nov 17, 2015 0 comments

This interview with Mary Ellen Mark took place before her death on May 25, 2015, at the age of 75. Considered to be the ultimate “humanist” photographer, she will always be remembered for the honesty, compassion, and empathy she gave to everyone.

Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Oct 13, 2015 0 comments

“Every time I see your face it reminds me of the places we used to go…” sings Ringo Starr in his song Photograph, co-written with George Harrison on a yacht in the south of France in 1971. Much of the world may not be aware that Ringo is also a photographer who chronicled the frequent travels of The Beatles during their heyday in the 1960s.

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Suzanne Driscoll Posted: May 01, 2015 0 comments

“What happens to a dream deferred?” asks Langston Hughes in his famous poem. Photographer Robert Weingarten found a way to fulfill his dream, even though it happened much later in life. In high school, a guidance counselor advised he would have to choose between a career in photography and working in the finance world if he wanted to make some decent money. “I grew up in a tenement in Brooklyn, New York, and hated being poor,” Weingarten recalls. “But I always had a passion for photography and loved taking and developing pictures.”

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Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Feb 24, 2015 0 comments

Legendary celebrity photographer Terry O’Neill always wanted to be a jazz drummer. When he was 10 he made his own drum kit from cookie tins, and by the time he was 14 had quit school and was playing in jazz clubs with a local band. After a stint in the army, O’Neill thought he might get the chance to travel to the U.S. to play in clubs there if he worked as an airline steward. So he applied to what now is British Airways and was very surprised to be handed an Agfa Silette camera and told to take pictures of people around Heathrow airport.

Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Jun 20, 2014 Published: May 01, 2014 0 comments

Known as a master of combining art in the traditional sense with photography, Chiarenza has been making pictures for five decades. He started out with tightly framed, documentary-style photographs that sparked a lifelong interest in abstract images and landscapes. But since 1979 he has been making collages out of scraps of paper, foil, can lids, and whatever else he finds or people send him. He then photographed the collages with Polaroid positive/negative film, always in black and white. Using light, shapes, forms, and surfaces, the results are very unique images that encourage the viewer to let his or her imagination do all the interpretation.

Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Apr 04, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments

Vincent van Gogh once said, “Stars are the souls of dead poets, but to become a star you have to die.” Vivian Maier (1926 - 2009) was an amateur photographer who had no desire to share her work with anyone during her life, and kept a treasure trove of over 100,000 prints, negatives, and films in five storage lockers in Chicago. By several twists of fate, they ended up in the hands of a few collectors who recognized their unique quality, and are now shown in books, documentaries, museums, and galleries throughout the world.

Suzanne Driscoll Posted: May 14, 2013 Published: Apr 01, 2013 1 comments

Actor Richard Gere is best known for his roles in over 40 films, but few may be aware he is also an avid photographer and collector. Taking pictures on his many trips to India was always more of a personal project, until photography book and exhibition designer Elizabeth Avedon happened to notice a 3-foot stack of beautiful 8x10 photos in his loft. “A lot of these photographs I didn’t show anyone because it was such a private experience for me,” Gere recalls. “I had no interest in sharing them.” Fortunately, Avedon was able to convince him they needed to be seen, and these and other photos have been exhibited around the world and published in his book, Pilgrim.

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