Talking Pictures

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Staff Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

During December of 2006 we spent two days in London en route to Israel. Although the weather was cold and gray, we spent much of our time outdoors. My 17-year-old daughter brought along an old film Canon Rebel she borrowed from a friend. Being an artist, she spent much of her time trying to capture interesting shots she could later paint. After a few years of urging her to try photography as...

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Staff Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

While watching the sun set over Monument Valley on the Arizona/Utah border this past January, my shadow and that of two good friends fell across this sandstone boulder. Raising my camera (I'm in the middle), I not only recorded the grandeur of Monument Valley, but also embossed our shadows forever on this print as a reminder of this trip and our friendship.
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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

This picture was taken near Tioga Pass, Yosemite, in early October. I was on a photo op trip with some buddies to capture the beautiful California fall foliage in the High Sierras. Peak colors were a couple of weeks behind schedule last year in much of the Sierras. Most of our trip was spent at lower elevations where the deciduous aspen thrive. We woke up each morning...

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Staff Posted: Sep 12, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 83 comments
Late in 2010 I made a trip to South China to visit my wife’s family in a village of rice and vegetable farmers. Being very hot and humid there, I always looked forward to walking the bean fields with my camera late in the day. It’s very peaceful and sometimes you can catch a cool breeze.
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Staff Posted: Jul 28, 2011 Published: Jun 01, 2011 0 comments
Professional bull riding is classified as an extreme and dangerous sport in nearly any measure that you care to describe. The bulls are big and dangerous; the riders are small and fragile in comparison. I took this photograph of a bull rider literally moments after being bucked off in front of an indoor arena full of screaming fans. He rode for less than 8 seconds, and consequently his day was done. The bull won.
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Staff Posted: Jan 27, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 4 comments
As collectors of 19th century American paintings, my wife and I are very familiar with the wonderful twilight paintings of Frederic Church, Albert Bierstadt, Jasper Cropsey, Samuel Colman, and Jervis McEntee. While touring Grand Teton National Park in the fall of 2009 we passed by the overlook to Lava Creek on numerous occasions and stopped to determine the possibility for a good panoramic shot. I took several over the course of a few days but was not satisfied with the lighting conditions.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Dec 17, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments
Rick Sammon’s first comment when I asked about this picture was, “The best time to take a night picture is not at night.” Twilight is a better choice, and that’s when this image was made in Albuquerque, New Mexico, which was the first stop for Rick and his wife, Susan, on their six-day tour last April of selected attractions along Route 66.
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Staff Posted: Jun 26, 2012 Published: May 01, 2012 15 comments
Traveling in winter on the train from Dresden, Germany, the mostly overcast countryside zipped by as the train quickly moved along on its way to our destination in Prague, Czech Republic. Occasionally the sun peeked out from the clouds and lit up the houses and the industrial areas we traveled through. At first I thought my images might be impaired by a too slow shutter speed and the reflection in the train windows, but I quickly decided to use those problems to my advantage. The photos I ultimately made (and named “Views From the Train”) clearly indicate movement, low light, and reflections; qualities that mirror both the literal and metaphorical aspects of the country we traveled through.
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Staff Posted: Aug 30, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 58 comments
While shooting waterfalls in North Carolina, I noticed the glowing reflection of the morning sun at my back. I quickly changed my position and captured this image. The majority of people in my area were facing a different direction, missing the beauty of the soft morning light on the slow-moving water upstream as it appeared on the opposite side of the stream from the falls. The morning light was impressive and little to no color boost was necessary to deliver this picture.
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Staff Posted: Sep 24, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 0 comments
When this old pebble balanced there by the Ice Age thousands of years ago in the Garden of the Gods Park near Colorado Springs, Colorado, tumbles from its perch, it could be the end of the world. I used a slow shutter speed to get this shot as the old boulder wasn’t shaking at the time. But who knows?
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Staff Posted: Oct 04, 2013 Published: Sep 01, 2013 0 comments
August, 8:45pm. The sun just set and the mercury is still hovering above 95. Not even a whisper of a breeze. It’s hot. It’s too hot to sleep, too hot to work—too hot to think. My only hope sits out back, parked on a pad covered with pavers. I simply need to turn the key, press the start button, and my ride will roar to life with only a single thought—escape the heat! I head west on State Route 412, a lonely deserted road that goes nowhere but has lovely sweeping curves and hard level straightaways where my baby can cut loose. With my feet on the pegs, the wind blows my hair back and sweat evaporates from my skin. Blessed relief!
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Staff Posted: May 29, 2012 Published: Apr 01, 2012 12 comments
Hiking through the mountains in the Poudre Canyon above Fort Collins, Colorado, I happened upon a small clearing. Up against a mountain and surrounded by a grove of aspen trees, I found this very old abandoned cabin. The sight of this stopped me in my tracks. I immediately felt chills and a sense that I was stepping back in time. I took very slow steps as I listened to the wind move through the cracks of this home from the past. I felt as though I was trespassing on a family from long ago. I stayed long enough to capture this image with the sun setting the front aglow.
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Staff Posted: Aug 27, 2013 Published: Jul 01, 2013 0 comments
As frequent visitors to the Gettysburg National Military Park researching the participation of my wife’s family in many different regiments during the battle, my wife and I had a strange occurrence one morning. We always arrive at our chosen point on the battlefield well before sunrise each visit. This particular morning we were set up on Cemetery Hill facing Culp’s Hill and the soon to be arriving sunrise. The morning had good promise as there was some ground fog in place already. Suddenly, from the lower part of the valley, a thick fog began rolling in. It didn’t appear from the ground up as normally happens, but was a dense mass pushing into the valley. It covered the ground up to a knoll to our right and just left parts of the treetops visible. From then on it was just scrambling around with the camera on the tripod, hitting the infrared remote and then moving again.
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Staff Posted: Jun 18, 2013 Published: May 01, 2013 3 comments
The January rainstorms had come to the Utah high desert mountains, making it a perfect day to capture the storm clouds and rainbows that moved across the various mountain ranges. As I was driving on the outskirts of the small town of Gunlock, Utah, I came around a large mountain cliff ledge. To my surprise under the ledge were at least a dozen donkeys trying to escape the cold, freezing drizzle and get the warmth coming off the rock face. There were two donkeys in particular that caught my eye because of their noisy insistence on being in the same place.
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Staff Posted: Apr 11, 2013 Published: Mar 01, 2013 0 comments
Growing up in Florida, I began playing golf at an early age. However, for many years the most important club in my golf bag was the ball retriever. Florida golf courses are notorious for their water hazards and I believe I found many of them.

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