Talking Pictures

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Staff Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

One of my favorite art galleries is the Jellies Gallery in California’s Monterey Bay Aquarium. The “art” is constantly moving and endlessly fascinating. On my last visit I stood mesmerized in front of the giant sea nettle exhibit for about 20 minutes, trying to capture the sinuous grace of these incredible creatures with my D-SLR. It wasn’t until I stepped back that I...

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Staff Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

During December of 2006 we spent two days in London en route to Israel. Although the weather was cold and gray, we spent much of our time outdoors. My 17-year-old daughter brought along an old film Canon Rebel she borrowed from a friend. Being an artist, she spent much of her time trying to capture interesting shots she could later paint. After a few years of urging her to try photography as...

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Staff Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

While watching the sun set over Monument Valley on the Arizona/Utah border this past January, my shadow and that of two good friends fell across this sandstone boulder. Raising my camera (I'm in the middle), I not only recorded the grandeur of Monument Valley, but also embossed our shadows forever on this print as a reminder of this trip and our friendship.
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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

This picture was taken near Tioga Pass, Yosemite, in early October. I was on a photo op trip with some buddies to capture the beautiful California fall foliage in the High Sierras. Peak colors were a couple of weeks behind schedule last year in much of the Sierras. Most of our trip was spent at lower elevations where the deciduous aspen thrive. We woke up each morning...

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Staff Posted: Sep 12, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 75 comments
Late in 2010 I made a trip to South China to visit my wife’s family in a village of rice and vegetable farmers. Being very hot and humid there, I always looked forward to walking the bean fields with my camera late in the day. It’s very peaceful and sometimes you can catch a cool breeze.
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 17, 2015 0 comments

Nope, editorial and advertising photographer Jody Dole doesn’t go down to the dump to look for subject matter. He’s more a flea market and tag sale type, and it was at the former that he met a picker who had, in Dole’s words, “really interesting junk—and an eye for interesting things.” Which is why Dole stops by at the guy’s place now and then, or vice versa, and an interesting thing or two changes hands.

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Staff Posted: Jul 28, 2011 Published: Jun 01, 2011 0 comments
Professional bull riding is classified as an extreme and dangerous sport in nearly any measure that you care to describe. The bulls are big and dangerous; the riders are small and fragile in comparison. I took this photograph of a bull rider literally moments after being bucked off in front of an indoor arena full of screaming fans. He rode for less than 8 seconds, and consequently his day was done. The bull won.
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Sep 25, 2015 0 comments

Dr. Alan Sloyer, traveling with his son in Kochi, India, somewhat reluctantly agreed to a sunset cruise. “It wasn’t really my thing,” Dr. Sloyer says, but when sunset turned startlingly dramatic it became very much his thing: a passion for photographing memorable travel moments.

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 29, 2014 Published: Mar 01, 2014 0 comments

“I got to Los Angeles four days before the ’84 Olympic games began, and at the gymnastics pavilion saw Glenn Sundby, the founder and publisher of International Gymnast magazine. I knew Glenn, and he’d been hired as venue chief for photographers. Not knowing he’d get that job, two years earlier he’d bought an arena ticket and had a front row center seat for the events. He gave me that ticket in return for use in his magazine of any photographs USA Gymnastics didn’t choose.

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Staff Posted: Jan 27, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 3 comments
As collectors of 19th century American paintings, my wife and I are very familiar with the wonderful twilight paintings of Frederic Church, Albert Bierstadt, Jasper Cropsey, Samuel Colman, and Jervis McEntee. While touring Grand Teton National Park in the fall of 2009 we passed by the overlook to Lava Creek on numerous occasions and stopped to determine the possibility for a good panoramic shot. I took several over the course of a few days but was not satisfied with the lighting conditions.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Dec 17, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments
Rick Sammon’s first comment when I asked about this picture was, “The best time to take a night picture is not at night.” Twilight is a better choice, and that’s when this image was made in Albuquerque, New Mexico, which was the first stop for Rick and his wife, Susan, on their six-day tour last April of selected attractions along Route 66.
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jun 26, 2015 0 comments

Pro photographer Jim Reed’s specialty is images of severe and unusual weather; in short, he’s a stormchaser.

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Staff Posted: Jun 26, 2012 Published: May 01, 2012 6 comments
Traveling in winter on the train from Dresden, Germany, the mostly overcast countryside zipped by as the train quickly moved along on its way to our destination in Prague, Czech Republic. Occasionally the sun peeked out from the clouds and lit up the houses and the industrial areas we traveled through. At first I thought my images might be impaired by a too slow shutter speed and the reflection in the train windows, but I quickly decided to use those problems to my advantage. The photos I ultimately made (and named “Views From the Train”) clearly indicate movement, low light, and reflections; qualities that mirror both the literal and metaphorical aspects of the country we traveled through.
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Staff Posted: Aug 30, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 50 comments
While shooting waterfalls in North Carolina, I noticed the glowing reflection of the morning sun at my back. I quickly changed my position and captured this image. The majority of people in my area were facing a different direction, missing the beauty of the soft morning light on the slow-moving water upstream as it appeared on the opposite side of the stream from the falls. The morning light was impressive and little to no color boost was necessary to deliver this picture.
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Staff Posted: Sep 24, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 0 comments
When this old pebble balanced there by the Ice Age thousands of years ago in the Garden of the Gods Park near Colorado Springs, Colorado, tumbles from its perch, it could be the end of the world. I used a slow shutter speed to get this shot as the old boulder wasn’t shaking at the time. But who knows?

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